All posts tagged: Workers

Between Layoffs and Tougher Interviews, Tech Workers Are Stressed Out

Between Layoffs and Tougher Interviews, Tech Workers Are Stressed Out

There was a time when getting a job at Google or Amazon would be a ticket to long-term stability and success. Many of the big tech companies seemed immune to large-scale layoffs, and as their profits skyrocketed, those cushy jobs became highly sought-after. But economic headwinds, and the looming influence of AI, are leading to some tumultuous changes in the tech industry. In just the first seven weeks of this year, Amazon, Google, Discord, Duolingo, Cisco, Instacart, and dozens of others all made deep staffing cuts. It all adds up to tens of thousands of jobs lost across the industry, and the cuts aren’t slowing down. It doesn’t help that interviewing for tech jobs is getting harder too, with employers asking for more and more work or rigorous testing before making a hire. This week, WIRED senior writer Paresh Dave joins us to talk about whether the layoffs will cool off, and why right now is a daunting time to be looking for a tech job. Show Notes Read Paresh’s story about how Google has …

Affordable housing complex offers relief for Hollywood workers

Affordable housing complex offers relief for Hollywood workers

Tatyana Kim and her husband Anatoliy O immigrated to Los Angeles from Almaty, Kazakhstan, 12 years ago in pursuit of the Hollywood dream. When the filmmaking duo first arrived in the United States, they scraped by, living in small rooms and back houses in Pasadena while studying their crafts at L.A.-area arts colleges. They eventually upgraded to a rent-controlled apartment in Hollywood, where they paid $1,500 a month to share a single bedroom with their infant daughter. At the nearby TCL Chinese Theatre, the couple would eat oatmeal for dinner while waiting in line for movie screenings. But even that relatively low housing cost was a stretch for independent artists trying to make it in an increasingly challenging industry while taking care of a young child and juggling extra film and commercial producing gigs to pay the bills. “Let’s just be transparent,” O said. “Most artists who I know are having a day job. That’s the reality of it. There’s no way around it.” Luckily, they found relief. Now, the couple pays $870 a month …

Robots are replacing workers US companies can’t find in the labor market

Robots are replacing workers US companies can’t find in the labor market

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trying to keep up with customer demand, Batesville Tool & Die began seeking 70 people to hire last year. It wasn’t easy. Attracting factory workers to a community of 7,300 in the Indiana countryside was a tough sell, especially having to compete with big-name manufacturers nearby like Honda and Cummins Engine. Job seekers were scarce. “You could count on one hand how many people in the town were unemployed,” said Jody Fledderman, the CEO. “It was just crazy.’’ Batesville Tool & Die managed to fill just 40 of its vacancies. Enter the robots. The company invested in machines that could mimic human workers and in vision systems, which helped its robots “see” what they were doing. The Batesville experience and others like it have been replicated countlessly across the United States for the past couple of years. Chronic worker shortages have led many companies to invest in machines to do some of the work they can’t find people to do. They’ve also been training the workers they do have to use advanced …

Prince William meets aid workers helping victims of Middle East conflict – live updates

Prince William meets aid workers helping victims of Middle East conflict – live updates

The Prince of Wales has heard about the devastating human suffering caused by the ongoing war in the Middle East and Gaza, as he paid a visit to the British Red Cross headquarters in London on Tuesday.  William, 41, spoke to aid workers and heard first-hand about their experience of working to help victims of the conflict. The British Red Cross, which has an emergency fundraising appeal, is providing humanitarian support in the region in the form of first aid, ambulances, and medical support. The Red Cross Red Crescent Movement is leading operations, including Magen David Adom in Israel and the Palestine Red Crescent Society. © GettyPrince William was guided by chair Liz Padmore and Beatrice Butsana-Sita, British Red Cross CEO, as he visited the charity’s headquarters William heard about these operations in place, as well as the latest situation on the ground, in particular in Gaza.  The Prince also met members of the charity’s psycho-social team, who provide mental health support to those who are enduring trauma and suffering around the world. Before leaving, William …

The Secret Label Code TK Maxx Workers Use To Spot Bargains

The Secret Label Code TK Maxx Workers Use To Spot Bargains

Whether you’re a fellow charity shop regular or masterful eBay deal spotter, it’s safe to say that when it comes to clothes, most of us love a bargain. And TK Maxx, which sells overstocked clothing from big-name brands at a reduced price, is a haven of them for many. Regular visitors might want to know, however, that there’s a secret code the workers are in on which separate the deals from the duds ― and it’s visible on the clothing’s labels. Daniel Baker, a former senior merchandiser for the brand, revealed the trick on Channel 5′s show TK Maxx: How do they do it? “On any label [in the store], you can see a number,” he revealed in the show. Which number should I keep an eye out for? “The number that is really exciting to a customer is number two because that means it’s genuine stock that was sold at a higher price somewhere else,” Daniel revealed. “It’s excess stock or something like that.” This could indicate that you’re getting a really high-quality, or …

Zero-hour contract workers ‘stuck’ for years amid new ban calls | UK | News

Zero-hour contract workers ‘stuck’ for years amid new ban calls | UK | News

Zero-hour contract workers are “stuck” on low-pay and insecurity, a new report has claimed. The TUC says employers are “parking workers on zero-hour contracts for years on end” as it leads calls to ban the practice. It study, which used official data, found that two in three zero-hour workers have been with their current employer for over a year, with one in eight having been with them for over a decade. Only 7% of zero-hour workers have been with their employer for less than three months, says the TUC. The latest data showed there are 1.15 million people on these contracts. Black and minority ethnic women are nearly three times as likely to be on zero hours contracts as white men, said the report. TUC general secretary Paul Nowak said: “Everyone should be treated fairly at work, but too many workers – especially black and ethnic minority women – are trapped in low-paid jobs on zero hours contracts, with few rights and protections and no guarantee of shifts. “Bad employers are parking workers on zero …

Paris’s Eiffel Tower closes as workers go on strike over management

Paris’s Eiffel Tower closes as workers go on strike over management

Paris (AFP) – The Eiffel Tower, one of the world’s top tourist attractions, was closed Monday after staff went on strike, unions told AFP. Issued on: 19/02/2024 – 10:33 1 min The strike, which was called to protest over the way the monument is managed financially, could be extended, they said. The tower’s operator, SETE, said on its website that “visits of the monument will be disrupted on Monday”. It advised ticket holders to check its website before showing up, or to postpone their visit. E-ticket holders were asked to check their e-mails for further information. The stoppage is the second strike at the Eiffel Tower within two months for the same reason. Unions have criticised operator SETE for its business model that they say is based on an inflated estimate of future visitor numbers, while under-estimating construction costs. The Eiffel Tower — Paris’s most famous landmark — attracts nearly seven million visitors a year, around three-quarters of them foreigners, according to its website. During the Covid pandemic numbers dropped sharply due to closures and …

Thousands of migrant care workers believed to be abusing UK visa rules | Politics | News

Thousands of migrant care workers believed to be abusing UK visa rules | Politics | News

An immigration official has revealed a quarter of foreign care workers are reportedly abusing UK visa rules by illegally working in other industires. The chief inspector of borders and immigration, David Neal, has released a series of shocking findings from his inspection into the Home Office’s handling of the social care visa route since it was introduced in 2022. The visa was designed to plug a labour shortage in the care sector. However, Neal says he found the Home Office had issued 275 visas to a care home that did not exist. And another 1,234 were given to a company that stated it only had four workers when it was given its licence to operate. This means over 1,500 migrants from two instances alone were allowed to move to the UK under the guise of having a job in care, reports The Times. Neal is understood to have issued a report to the Home Office earlier this month. However it is said to be one of 13 waiting to be released. While the reports are …

S,000 SkillsFuture top-up will push workers to upskill, but employers’ support is key: HR experts

S$4,000 SkillsFuture top-up will push workers to upskill, but employers’ support is key: HR experts

SUPPORT FROM EMPLOYERS  Since the S$4,000 top-up can also be used for part-time courses, support from employers is key for workers pursuing these accreditations, HR experts said.  Some employers may not want their employees to pursue courses because the company does not directly benefit from the training. If employees have to sacrifice promotions or a higher salary, they are also unlikely to want to take courses.  “A reskilled or upskilled worker may subsequently seek better job opportunities elsewhere,” said NUS’ Dr Xu.  Having employees away on training will pose challenges to companies, especially smaller ones.  “SMEs (small- and medium-size enterprises) would say it’s a good-to-have, but not a must-have,” said Ms Jasmine Liew, founder of Breakthrough Catalyst, an organisational development consultancy.  “Even short courses are already an issue, if I let you attend (courses) for one year, two years, then who’s going to do your job?”  But from a staff engagement and retention perspective, allowing employees to develop their careers may encourage them to stay with the company, she said.  “Doing a course for two years …