All posts tagged: Turkish

British film industry ‘at risk of losing huge number of talented people’

British film industry ‘at risk of losing huge number of talented people’

He also said: “Producers and production companies being able to earn a fair fee for their work and not having to defer their fees, and allowing them to build much more sustainable businesses, because too often you see producers having to defer (fees) so much that feels unsustainable, and they struggle to make their next film, or even stay in the industry, because it’s too hard to build a business.” Source link

Turkish Man Jailed for 20 Years for Role in Italian Migrant Shipwreck

Turkish Man Jailed for 20 Years for Role in Italian Migrant Shipwreck

ROME (Reuters) – A Turkish citizen has been sentenced to 20 years in jail in Italy for his part in a migrant shipwreck last year in which at least 94 people were killed, Italian media reported on Wednesday. A judge from the southern Italian town of Crotone also imposed a 3 million euro ($3.2 million) fine on Gun Ufuk after he was convicted of being an organiser of a people smuggling gang behind a voyage that ended in tragedy last February. Prosecutors alleged Ufuk was piloting the boat that had set off from Western Turkey with around 180 people aboard. The victims died when the vessel smashed apart in stormy weather off the shore of the town of Cutro in Italy’s southern toe. Ufuk denied wrongdoing and said he had only been on board because he was trying to escape political persecution in Turkey. He was arrested in Austria last March after fleeing across the border from Italy. He was sentenced after opting for a fast-track trial. The maximum sentence for the crime is 30 …

Uncertainty surrounds Turkish post-quake rebuild – despite bold promises | Global development

Uncertainty surrounds Turkish post-quake rebuild – despite bold promises | Global development

Days before the anniversary of twin earthquakes that devastated swaths of Turkey’s south-east on 6 February 2023, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan returned to Hatay province, the area worst hit by the destruction that killed at least 55,000 in Turkey and Syria. Standing on stage in a sports stadium on the outskirts of Antakya, a city once rich in history now all but levelled by the quakes, the Turkish president continued to offer bold promises for reconstruction at break-neck speed, just as he had a year ago. “No matter what difficulties we encounter or we experience due to reasons beyond our control, there is no stopping or resting for us until we make Antakya a more magnificent, safer and more vibrant city than before,” he declared. Had the presidential sedan travelled deeper into the city, the challenges wrapped up in these promises would have been made clear. Where whole neighbourhoods once stood, there is now block after empty block. At the city’s covered market, a few determined residents have in recent weeks begun returning to restart their …

After the Quake: One Turkish Family’s Struggle

After the Quake: One Turkish Family’s Struggle

Finally, 106 days after the ambulances rushed their battered bodies to the hospital, the couple were cleared to leave. Ibrahim Karapirli hobbled back from physical therapy on crutches to protect his aching leg. His wife, Pinar, wrangled their twin toddlers, unsure how she would care for them with her one remaining arm. The couple were still mourning their two sons who were killed when a powerful earthquake pancaked their six-story apartment building in southern Turkey before dawn last February. Ibrahim and Pinar piled about a dozen plastic bags holding their possessions atop a wheelchair, bade the nurses goodbye and went to their car. “God, please don’t let us end up here again,” Pinar said. Ibrahim drove, despite a hulking plastic brace on his right leg. He was anxious to return to work and find a safe new home for his family, if it was possible for them to feel safe anywhere. As he pulled into traffic, a Turkish pop song mourning a lost love came on the stereo. “Day after day, I have to forget …

‘No one can bring back what we lost’: fears rise among poor in Turkish city ravaged by earthquakes | Turkey-Syria earthquake 2023

‘No one can bring back what we lost’: fears rise among poor in Turkish city ravaged by earthquakes | Turkey-Syria earthquake 2023

Rows of bright white marble gravestones dot a hillside on the outskirts of Antakya, some bearing the words “martyr of the earthquake”. The final resting place for the city’s dead will soon be overshadowed by tower blocks for those who survived. Bright yellow cranes jut into the skyline on the next hillside, slowly birthing a cluster of concrete skeletons, new government housing for some of the hundreds of thousands who lost their homes when deadly earthquakes struck southern Turkey and northern Syria last February. “No one can bring back what was lost, as we lost everything,” said İsa Akbaba, who lost seven members of his extended family along with his home. İsa gently helped his mother, Suat, navigate the muddy hillside leading to the graves of his elder sister, Sıdıka, and his younger brother, Musa, pictures of their smiling faces carved into the headstones. Suat dabbed a little red nail polish, her daughter’s favourite, on Sıdıka’s grave, as she wailed with grief and kissed their gravestones. map Tuesday 6 February will mark one year since …

Levante, London: ‘A very happy find’ – restaurant review | Turkish food and drink

Levante, London: ‘A very happy find’ – restaurant review | Turkish food and drink

Levante, 11 Lewis Grove, London SE13 6BG (020 8355 3522). Starters £5-£11, mains £11-£19, desserts £4.95-£5.50, wines from £17 I am standing in front of a corrugated shutter in Lewisham, southeast London, thinking about what might have been. Behind this shutter is a one-time caff, a venerable greasy spoon if you will, that once traded in the holy trinity of egg, chips and beans, alongside steaming mugs of tea the colour of a Caramac bar. Recently it was taken over by the Italian Antonio Delicatessen next door. It’s still a caff, only now one with a strong Italian accent, utilising the ingredients stocked by the mothership. We mourn the passing of greasy spoons and with good reason. They are vital third spaces; community hubs that feed more than just our bellies. But they are too easily defined by menu. There are one-time greasy spoons serving cheap Greek Cypriot, Chinese and Thai food. This one could still be true to its origins, even with a ragù-splattered menu. It’s about intent, not recipes. Anyway, all this ethnographic …

Still in ruins: the 2023 Turkish earthquake – then and now | Turkey-Syria earthquake 2023

Still in ruins: the 2023 Turkish earthquake – then and now | Turkey-Syria earthquake 2023

Over 65 nightmarish seconds of the pre-dawn hours of 6 February 2023, the ground swallowed swathes of entire cities across south-east Turkey resulting in more than 50,000 deaths. Bridges collapsed, roads and airport tarmacs cracked and millions of lives across 11 Turkish provinces were upturned by the time the rest of the country woke up, stunned. A site of the earthquake in Hatay, photographed in 2023 and 2024A couple look at destroyed buildings on 19 February 2023 in Hatay, and the same scene a year later. Photographs by Chris McGrath/GettyThe initial 7.8-magnitude earthquake shook the ground as far away as Egypt. A year later, hundreds of thousands of people remain displaced, many living in container cities, while the rest of the quake-prone country waits in fear for the next big shake. A site of the earthquake in Hatay, photographed in 2023 and 2024A destroyed mosque amid the rubble of collapsed buildings on 20 February 2023 in Hatay, and the same scene a year later. Photographs by Burak Kara/GettyMore than 850,000 buildings crumbled in the initial …

Turkish Authorities Capture Gunmen Who Killed One Person in Istanbul Church

Turkish Authorities Capture Gunmen Who Killed One Person in Istanbul Church

ISTANBUL (Reuters) -Turkish authorities have captured two gunmen who shot one person dead on Sunday during a service at a church in Istanbul and who are believed to be tied to Islamic State, Interior Minister Ali Yerlikaya said. Yerlikaya had earlier said that the attack, which Ankara condemned, took place around 0840 GMT at the Italian Santa Maria Catholic Church in Istanbul’s Sariyer district, and that one Turkish citizen – who was targeted by the gunmen – was killed while attending the service. Speaking to reporters later, Yerlikaya said authorities had carried out raids on more than 30 locations across Istanbul and detained 47 people until now. The suspects were captured in one of the last raids, he said. “Both of the suspects are foreign nationals. One of them is from Tajikistan and the other is Russian, and we evaluated them to be with Islamic State,” Yerlikaya said, adding they would be questioned about the attack. Earlier, Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement on Telegram, saying it was in response to …

Turkish Parliament votes in favor of Sweden’s NATO membership

Turkish Parliament votes in favor of Sweden’s NATO membership

The Turkish parliament, during the ratification vote for Sweden’s NATO membership, at the Grand National Assembly of Turkey, in Ankara, January 23, 2024. ADEM ALTAN / AFP Turkish media described the vote as “decisive” for Sweden’s future. It was greeted in Stockholm with palpable relief, but no more than that. In Western capitals, it was greeted with only polite applause, reflecting the growing divide between Ankara and the other NATO members, a gap that continued to widen throughout the interminable negotiations. It took four hours on Tuesday, January 23, for lawmakers from Turkey’s presidential majority to adopt, by 287 votes to 55, the protocol for Sweden’s accession to the Atlantic Alliance, which has been on hold since May 2022. Turkey’s head of state, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, will now sign the text. In theory, this is a formality, which he should complete in the next few days. At that point, Hungary will be the only one of the 31 members of the Alliance not to have given the Scandinavian state the green light. On Tuesday …

Turkish parliament votes in favor of Sweden’s NATO membership

Turkish parliament votes in favor of Sweden’s NATO membership

Comment on this storyComment Add to your saved stories Save ISTANBUL — After 20 months of demands, obstruction and delay, the Turkish parliament voted Tuesday night in favor of Sweden joining NATO, clearing one of the final hurdles for a major expansion of the military alliance set in motion by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan still needs to sign the ratification document. Assuming he does, Hungary would be the last remaining holdout. Officials there have previously signaled that they would not, ultimately, stand in the way. On Tuesday, Prime Minister Viktor Orban announced, somewhat cryptically, that he had invited the Swedish prime minister to visit to “negotiate on Sweden’s NATO accession.” Swedish Prime Minister Ulf Kristersson appeared to respond only to the Turkish vote, writing on X, formerly Twitter, “Today we are one step closer to becoming a full member of NATO.” The vote was 287 in favor and 55 against with four abstentions. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg welcomed the outcome, adding, “I also count on Hungary to complete its …