All posts tagged: opinion

Photos: Two Years of War in Ukraine

Photos: Two Years of War in Ukraine

Saturday will mark the two-year anniversary of Russia’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine. Although the Russian military initially made broad advances into the country beginning on February 24, 2022, Ukrainian forces, backed by Western support, resisted fiercely, forcing Russia to pull back into eastern and southern Ukraine. Soon, front lines hundreds of miles long were established, and the war evolved into a long and punishing battle of artillery, drones, and close combat across trenches, shattered forests, and ruined villages. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers and civilians have been killed or injured in the conflict. As Russia continues to launch missiles into all parts of Ukraine and presses forward with ground attacks across the front line, Ukrainian forces face intensifying shortages of manpower and ammunition. Gathered below are images from recent months, showing a region reshaped by two years of war. Source link

Creating a ‘smoke-free generation’ is a unique chance to lead the world in tackling tobacco

Creating a ‘smoke-free generation’ is a unique chance to lead the world in tackling tobacco

Tobacco ruins lives. It causes conditions ranging from stillbirth and asthma to dementia and cancer, leads to over 400,000 hospital admissions a year, and ultimately kills two in three lifetime smokers.  Over the coming weeks, MPs will debate new laws to create a ‘smoke-free generation’, meaning no-one born on or after 1 January, 2009, can be legally sold a cigarette. This is a truly transformative piece of public health policy that could see an end to tobacco use in England. Banning sales of a product eliminates individual choice and is not a policy approach to be taken lightly. Yet, as a freely available product to people over 18, tobacco is a uniquely harmful and addictive substance that warrants a uniquely restrictive policy approach. There are no safe levels of tobacco, no safe age to smoke, and no health benefits. Addiction generally starts young; children who grow up in a household with smokers are three times more likely to start smoking themselves. And once hooked, three out of four smokers wish they had never started, yet …

Winners of the 2024 Underwater Photographer of the Year Contest

Winners of the 2024 Underwater Photographer of the Year Contest

The winning entries in this year’s Underwater Photographer of the Year contest have just been announced, and Alex Dawson was named Underwater Photographer of the Year 2024 for his image of a whale skeleton on the seafloor, beneath the ice, in Greenland. Prizes and commendations were handed out in categories including Wide Angle, Macro, Wrecks, Behavior, Portrait, Black and White, Compact, Up and Coming, and more. Contest organizers were once again kind enough to share some of this year’s honorees with us below, with captions written by the photographers. Source link

Martha’s Rule to give NHS patients and families right to urgent second opinion | UK News

Martha’s Rule to give NHS patients and families right to urgent second opinion | UK News

Patients and their families can request a rapid second opinion from April if they are worried about a condition getting worse, as the NHS rolls out Martha’s Rule in England. The escalation process will instigate an urgent review by a different critical care team in the hospital and will be available 24/7. It can be used if a patient’s condition is rapidly worsening and they or their family feels they are not getting the care needed. The new process follows the death of 13-year-old Martha Mills in 2021, who developed sepsis under the care of King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in London. Her parents – who campaigned for the change – said they want it “in place as quickly and widely as possible”, with at least 100 NHS trusts expected to bring in the rule initially. “We believe Martha’s Rule will save lives,” Merope Mills and her husband Paul Laity said in a statement. “In cases of deterioration, families and carers by the bedside can be aware of changes busy clinicians can’t; their knowledge …

Opinion: Corgi’s love saved a homeless man. His friends’ love couldn’t

Opinion: Corgi’s love saved a homeless man. His friends’ love couldn’t

My dad had a simple rule: If someone needs your help, and you can give it, you do. So it was an easy decision for my wife and me to foster an older corgi in 2020 so that the dog’s owner, a professional man who had lost his job and slid into addiction and homelessness, could go to rehab and have a chance to get back on his feet. We took the corgi into our Hollywood apartment, gave it a bath, and set about trying to heal the stress and trauma it had suffered. The dog helped us heal too, from the loss of our own beloved corgi months earlier. And after its owner got sober, and was given help finding a job and place to live, the joy when they went home together made any sacrifices we had made seem more than worth it. Over time, the man became a kind and generous friend to us, driving me to doctor’s appointments when diabetes made me give up my car, and taking us to dinner …

Europe, US Restitution Sees Halting Progress As Public Opinion Shifts

Europe, US Restitution Sees Halting Progress As Public Opinion Shifts

While restitution has been a central topic in the art world on and off for decades, there has no doubt been a sea change in recent years. In 2023 there was a near-constant stream of news about returned and seized objects, launched initiatives, lawsuits ongoing and settled, and agreements struck between countries in the Global South and Europe. While restitution and repatriation debates still run hot, we appear to have reached a tipping point. Most observers cite French president Emmanuel Macron’s 2017 speech in Burkina Faso—when he said he wanted “the conditions met for the temporary or definitive restitution of African heritage to Africa”—as the start of the new era in restitution. Similarly disruptive was a 2018 report on African cultural objects in French museums that Macron commissioned, authored by Bénédicte Savoy, head of modern art history at the Technical University of Berlin, and Senegalese academic Felwine Sarr. It estimated that 90 to 95 percent of the continent’s artistic heritage is located outside Africa, and urged repatriation of requested artifacts. Related Articles Since that time, …

Opinion: Your brain learns from mistakes. And that can help your memory

Opinion: Your brain learns from mistakes. And that can help your memory

In our age of information overload, remembering things can be a daunting task. But as a memory researcher and college professor, I’ve found some hope in that challenge. In January 2021, like millions of educators and having watched my own daughter struggle with online learning, I worried about teaching through a screen. I had spent two decades basing grades primarily on midterms and finals, but it’s tough to prevent cheating during online tests. So I had to let go of traditional methods of testing to measure learning. Then I realized I could use a different testing system — to drive learning. In my lab, we were doing brain imaging studies based on decades-old research showing that testing people on recently viewed material dramatically increases their retention over time. Following the model in our experiments, I gave my students a three-day window to take an open-book quiz online every week, after which they could see the correct answers and either learn from their mistakes or reinforce what they got right. The point of these quizzes wasn’t …

Opinion: Blocking Ukraine aid is no way to put America dirst

Opinion: Blocking Ukraine aid is no way to put America dirst

For Presidents Day, the House is taking two weeks off. But first the Republicans who misrule the place honored their favorite president by blocking desperately needed aid for Ukraine — just as Donald Trump demanded. That fealty to the former president, and the resulting gift to Ukraine’s Russian invaders, was a terrible look even before Friday’s news that Vladimir Putin’s brave nemesis, Alexei Navalny, had died in an Arctic prison. Navalny joins the long list of Putin foes who’ve died behind bars, fallen from windows or been felled by bullets or poison. Every president since Franklin D. Roosevelt would be appalled at the Republicans’ acquiescence to Russia’s aggression. Except Trump. Opinion Columnist Jackie Calmes Jackie Calmes brings a critical eye to the national political scene. She has decades of experience covering the White House and Congress. And President Biden has to manage the mess that Trump and his “America First” disciples in Congress are making of U.S. reliability within the global alliances created after World War II. He’s the one who has to reassure NATO …

Tory MPs are hooked on plotting against their leaders – POLITICO

Tory MPs are hooked on plotting against their leaders – POLITICO

“There have been so many turnovers of leadership, and so many kind of assassinations that everyone is complicit,” former Conservative Chancellor George Osborne said on his podcast earlier this month. “If you were a Boris Johnson supporter, you’d say Sunak is an assassin, Sunak led a coup. Or if you were Simon Clarke, you’d say Sunak was unhelpful in the bringing down of Liz Truss,” Osborne added, referencing Truss ally Clarke’s recent call for Sunak to go for the good of the party. “There’s been years now of this, so it’s very hard for the leadership to call for unity when they themselves became the leaders on the back of a coup,” Osborne observed.  The Plot Some of the prime minister’s most staunch opponents certainly feel motivated by what they see as his deeply disloyal resignation as Johnson’s chief finance minister back in 2022. It helped set the herd in motion with a mass ministerial walk-out that ended Johnson’s time at the top.  “I will never forgive [Sunak] for basically putting personal ambition before country,” …

Opinion: Fani Willis’s bad judgment has endangered her case and the nation

Opinion: Fani Willis’s bad judgment has endangered her case and the nation

At this point, it doesn’t really matter whether Fulton County Dist. Atty. Fani Willis benefited financially from her relationship with Nathan Wade, the outside prosecutor she hired to help oversee the election interference racketeering case against former President Trump and 18 others, several of whom have already pleaded guilty. After watching her testify for nearly two hours on Thursday, I think she made a convincing case that she did not. If anything, she spent more money on him than he did on her. But by engaging in a romantic relationship with Wade (and believing she was under no obligation to disclose it), she handed her opponents — on a golden platter — an opening to challenge her integrity, an excuse to charge her with a conflict of interest, a backdoor way to stymie the strong criminal case against Trump and his supporters that took her office years to construct. It’s mind-boggling. And so, so disappointing. Two mature adults — officers of the court, experienced attorneys — could not find it in themselves to put their …