All posts tagged: Material

AI-Generated Child Sexual Abuse Material May Overwhelm Tip Line

AI-Generated Child Sexual Abuse Material May Overwhelm Tip Line

A new flood of child sexual abuse material created by artificial intelligence is threatening to overwhelm the authorities already held back by antiquated technology and laws, according to a new report released Monday by Stanford University’s Internet Observatory. Over the past year, new A.I. technologies have made it easier for criminals to create explicit images of children. Now, Stanford researchers are cautioning that the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, a nonprofit that acts as a central coordinating agency and receives a majority of its funding from the federal government, doesn’t have the resources to fight the rising threat. The organization’s CyberTipline, created in 1998, is the federal clearing house for all reports on child sexual abuse material, or CSAM, online and is used by law enforcement to investigate crimes. But many of the tips received are incomplete or riddled with inaccuracies. Its small staff has also struggled to keep up with the volume. “Almost certainly in the years to come, the CyberTipline will be flooded with highly realistic-looking A.I. content, which is going …

Physicists Suggest Universe Is Full of Material Moving Faster Than Light

Physicists Suggest Universe Is Full of Material Moving Faster Than Light

It could be what makes up dark matter. Dark Secrets New research suggests that the universe is filled with particles capable of traveling faster than light, LiveScience reports — and that this scenario holds up as a potentially “viable alternative” to our current cosmological model. The idea is a little far-fetched, sure, but it’s worth hearing out. These hypothetical particles, known as tachyons, aren’t likely to be real — but they’re not some hokey bit of sci-fi, either. The potential for their existence is something physicists have been giving serious thought for decades, raising fundamental questions about the nature of causality. As detailed in a yet-to-be-peer-reviewed study, the researchers posit that tachyons are what make up dark matter, an unobservable — and despite being widely considered to exist by scientists, technically hypothetical — substance that is thought to account for around 85 percent of all matter in the universe. Because we can only see dark matter’s substantial gravitational influence, we don’t know what it actually is, leaving the door open to all kinds of possibilities …

Apple Says ‘Goodbye Leather’ in New iPhone Ad Following Controversial Switch to ‘FineWoven’ Material

Apple Says ‘Goodbye Leather’ in New iPhone Ad Following Controversial Switch to ‘FineWoven’ Material

Apple today shared a new iPhone ad called “Goodbye Leather” on its YouTube channel in the U.K., months after the company controversially switched from leather to a much-criticized “FineWoven” fabric material for accessories. Apple discontinuing leather accessories for environmental benefits was a noble aspiration, but FineWoven accessories have been very poorly received. Just days after the first FineWoven cases were released for the iPhone, some customers and media outlets complained about the fabric exterior being prone to scratches and stains. A photo also surfaced of a FineWoven case with a misaligned USB-C port cutout. The Wall Street Journal‘s Joanna Stern said her FineWoven case was “browning like a rotten banana” after five months of usage. Image Credit: Joanna Stern/The Wall Street Journal “The edges are peeling, the fabric is scratched up like an old CD and it’s browning like a rotten banana,” she wrote, in her Tech Things newsletter. “I’ve been waiting for the CDC to show up at my house to declare it a biomedical concern.” Apple has yet to comment on FineWoven criticism, …

Solar panel breakthrough achieves record efficiency with new quantum material

Solar panel breakthrough achieves record efficiency with new quantum material

This new material, showcased in a prototype solar cell, boasts an impressive 80% photovoltaic absorption rate and 190% EQE. (CREDIT: Creative Commons) Lehigh University researchers have unveiled a groundbreaking material that could revolutionize the efficiency of solar panels. This new material, showcased in a prototype solar cell, boasts an impressive 80% photovoltaic absorption rate, along with a remarkable external quantum efficiency (EQE) of up to 190%. These figures far surpass the theoretical efficiency limit for traditional silicon-based materials, marking a significant advancement in the realm of photovoltaic technology. Professor Chinedu Ekuma, along with doctoral student Srihari Kastuar, published their findings in the esteemed journal Science Advances. Ekuma expressed enthusiasm, stating, “This work represents a significant leap forward in our understanding and development of sustainable energy solutions, highlighting innovative approaches that could redefine solar energy efficiency and accessibility in the near future.” Schematic of the thin-film solar cell with CuxGeSe/SnS as the active layer. (CREDIT: Ekuma Lab / Lehigh University) The material owes its enhanced efficiency to its unique “intermediate band states,” strategically positioned within its …

This US startup makes a crucial chip material and is taking on a Japanese giant

This US startup makes a crucial chip material and is taking on a Japanese giant

Thintronics is promising a product purpose-built for the computing demands of the AI era—a suite of new materials that the company claims have higher insulating properties and, if adopted, could mean data centers with faster computing speeds and lower energy costs.  The company is at the forefront of a coming wave of new US-based companies, spurred by the $280 billion CHIPS and Science Act, that is seeking to carve out a portion of the semiconductor sector, which has become dominated by just a handful of international players. But to succeed, Thintronics and its peers will have to overcome a web of challenges—solving technical problems, disrupting long-standing industry relationships, and persuading global semiconductor titans to accommodate new suppliers.  “Inventing new materials platforms and getting them into the world is very difficult,” Thintronics founder and CEO Stefan Pastine says. It is “not for the faint of heart.” The insulator bottleneck If you recognize the name Ajinomoto, you’re probably surprised to hear it plays a critical role in the chip sector: the company is better known as the …

New molecular device could revolutionise medical and material engineering

New molecular device could revolutionise medical and material engineering

Scientists from The University of Manchester have developed a first-of-its-kind molecular device that uses force to control the release of multiple small molecules. The molecule device has a force-controlled release system that harnesses natural forces to trigger the targeted release of molecules. This could significantly advance the health sector and smart materials. The device uses a new technique that relies on an interlocked molecule known as rotaxane. Under the influence of mechanical force, this component triggers the release of functional molecules to target the area in need. For example, medicines or healing agents can be released to target the site of a tumour. The new device also holds promise for self-healing materials that can repair themselves in situ when damaged, such as a scratch on a phone screen. The discovery is published in the journal Nature. The new device overcomes previous challenges Traditionally, the controlled release of molecules with force has presented challenges in releasing more than one molecule at once. Usually, the system operates through a molecular ‘tug of war’ game where two polymers …

Scientists Splice Material From Creature That Can Survive Outer Space Into Human Cells

Scientists Splice Material From Creature That Can Survive Outer Space Into Human Cells

Image by Getty / Futurism An almost-microscopic creature that’s sturdy enough to survive the ravages of space may hold the key to human longevity, scientists have found in new research. In a new study led by the University of Wyoming, an international team of researchers found that when looking into the incredible durability of the itty bitty tardigrade — known affectionately as the “water bear” or “moss piglet” — proteins from the creature might help slow aging in humans, too. Part of what’s made tardigrades so famous is that they can survive both boiling and freezing temperatures, which was why in 2007 a team of European scientists sent 3,000 of these half-millimeter-long little guys into space, and weren’t so shocked when the majority of them survived. When they’re threatened by temperatures, radiation, or other dangerous conditions, water bears go into a self-protective state of suspended animation known as biostasis — and it was that mechanism that interested molecular biologist and UW assistant professor Thomas Boothby, an expert in the field of tardigrades. In the UW …

Physicists have worked out how to melt any material

Physicists have worked out how to melt any material

Predicting when solids will melt is more difficult than you might think r.classen/Shutterstock Physicists may finally have an answer for a seemingly simple question that has remained unanswered for about a century: when does a substance melt? Kostya Trachenko at Queen Mary University of London found it mysterious that “in this age of scientific and technological development”, physicists do not always know how to predict at what temperature and pressure a material will melt. He has now derived an equation that can be used to make such predictions for a vast… Source link

New material neutralizes 96-percent of virus cells using nanospikes

New material neutralizes 96-percent of virus cells using nanospikes

Researchers at Australia’s Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) have combined brute force with high tech manufacturing to create a new silicon material for hospitals, laboratories and other potentially sensitive environments. And although it might look and feel like a flat, black mirror to humans, the thin layering actually functions as a thorny deathtrap for pathogens. As recently detailed in the journal ACS Nano, the interdisciplinary team spent over two years developing the novel material, which is smooth to the human touch. At a microscopic level, however, the silicon surface is covered in “nanospikes” so small and sharp that they can impale individual cells. In lab tests, 96-percent of all hPIV-3 virus cells that came into contact with the material’s miniscule needles either tore apart, or came away so badly damaged that they couldn’t replicate and create their usual infections like pneumonia, croup, and bronchitis. With no external assistance, these eradication levels could be accomplished within six hours. A virus cell on the nano spiked silicon surface, magnified 65,000 times. After 6 hours it has …

Emissions Are Not A Material Risk To Investors Or Companies, SEC’s Climate Disclosure Rule Is

Emissions Are Not A Material Risk To Investors Or Companies, SEC’s Climate Disclosure Rule Is

Authored by Justin Bis via RealClear Wire, The Securities and Exchange Commission is at it again. Straying from its core mission of “protecting investors, maintaining fair, orderly, and efficient markets, and facilitating capital formation,” the SEC is now taking the mantle of climate activist. Chairman Gary Gensler’s signature policy, the Climate Disclosure Rule, was just approved in a partisan 3-2 vote. Companies will now have to disclose direct and indirect emissions that they produce to investors. This rule, in the guise of informing investors of material risks in companies, will overwhelm investors with information that is unrelated to actual risks to a company’s performance. For example, how do the emissions coming from a company’s truck make an investment in that company riskier to investors? In this example at least, the answer is it doesn’t. But even if you could find an example, the SEC already requires companies to disclose material risks, and insurers – whose entire business depends on analyzing and assigning material risk – do not factor in emissions.  So, what is the point …