All posts tagged: direction

Meghan and Harry change ‘brand direction’ after ‘negative response’ to projects | Royal | News

Meghan and Harry change ‘brand direction’ after ‘negative response’ to projects | Royal | News

But she made it clear that this doesn’t mean there’s trouble in their marriage. Lourella said: “This decision doesn’t necessarily reflect on their relationship as a whole but more on the brand direction they are choosing to take.” She also mentioned that it’s a good moment for Harry and Meghan to start doing their own things, especially after they’ve just launched their new website. They’ve changed their site from Archewell to Sussex.com earlier this month. Louella added: “Meghan and Harry are strategic in their approach to their public image, and this move could be seen as a way for them to have more control over how they are perceived individually. “It may also give them the opportunity to explore different interests and passions without being tied to each other’s brands or projects.” Louella then admitted working with your partner can be an “intense experience”, meaning taking on different projects could give them “breathing space”. She continued: “It allows for growth and the chance to have new experiences outside of each other’s shadow, particularly given the …

Royal Family LIVE: Prince Harry ‘off guard’ with ‘no direction’ after King Charles visit | Royal | News

Royal Family LIVE: Prince Harry ‘off guard’ with ‘no direction’ after King Charles visit | Royal | News

Prince Harry has been caught off guard with no specific direction after King Charles’ visit, according to a royal expert. Speaking to TalkTV about Prince Harry’s relationship with King Charles, US-based royal commentator Kinsey Schofield said that while Harry was sincere about his family, the King’s cancer diagnosis may not be a trigger for the Duke of Sussex’s return to the royal fold. Speaking about recent interviews Prince Harry has done, she said: “I think that Harry seemed caught off guard by some of the questions and tried to stay positive but wrap it all back when it comes to the Invictus Games. “I think he was nice about his family, and he was positive about his family, but I don’t think that this is moving us in any specific direction when it comes to reconciliation.” Ms Schofield’s comments come as Duke and Duchess of Sussex redesigned their website and promoted the Invictus Games in Canada ahead of the first winter edition of the tournament in 2025. THIS IS A LIVE BLOG… FOLLOW BELOW FOR …

Dan Cole stands test of time to help England move in new direction | England rugby union team

Dan Cole stands test of time to help England move in new direction | England rugby union team

The smell of freshly cut Twickenham grass emanates from Dan Cole when he sits down, sporting training kit and clutching a pair of boots, in a windowless room beneath the home of English rugby. Having ticked off the first session of another demanding week in international camp the prop easily pivots from the training field to fielding questions from the gaggle of writers huddled around him. Tucking the black leather boots under his chair, Cole proceeds to bat back the ensuing inquiries with the confidence and humour of a player who has been there, seen it and done it in elite rugby. The 36-year-old’s England journey is a story well told; particularly the narrative arc from a difficult 2019 Rugby World Cup final against South Africa, to a phenomenal individual display in the one-point defeat by the Boks in last year’s semi-final. Four months ago at Stade de France, the Leicester tighthead’s rock-solid scrummaging was a crucial factor in England’s dominance of the eventual world champions for much of that tense last-four encounter. Even so, …

Do You Seek Happiness as a Direction or a Destination?

Do You Seek Happiness as a Direction or a Destination?

‘The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction, not a destination.’ This is a quote from the late psychologist Carl Rogers. He also went on to say ‘This process of the good life is not, I am convinced, a life for the faint-hearted. It involves the stretching and growing of becoming more and more of one’s potentialities. It involves the courage to be. It means launching oneself fully into the stream of life. Yet the deeply exciting thing about human beings is that when the individual is inwardly free, he chooses as the good life this process of becoming.’ This is a description of when people are at their best, living their lives to their full potential, doing things that they find meaningful and purposeful, feeling pleasure and joy in their activities, and engaged in rewarding and intimate relationships. But how often have we heard the adage that happiness is a direction, not a destination—a process and not an outcome? I have heard it many times and spent …

When it comes to startups’ flight to quality, have we swung too far in the other direction?

When it comes to startups’ flight to quality, have we swung too far in the other direction?

Listen here or wherever you get your podcasts. Hello, and welcome back to Equity, the podcast about the business of startups, where we unpack the numbers and nuance behind the headlines. This is our new Saturday show, where we sit down with a guest, think about their work, and unpack the rest. This week, we talked to Jenny Fielding, co-founder and managing partner at Everywhere Ventures, a founder collective and early-stage (think pre-seed) venture firm. Jenny and I discussed a wide variety of topics, including startups’ flight to quality in 2024 and how smaller firms are competing with larger firms in the current investment landscape. We also dug into the “great VC resignation” so stay through to the end for that. Jenny was a great guest – not afraid to speak her mind and share valuable insights. Besides founding her own venture firm, Jenny previously worked as a managing director for accelerator Techstars and founded several companies including mobile software company Switch Mobile, which was acquired by Via One. Alright, sit back, hit play and have some fun …

From China’s emissions to Australia’s offshore windfarms, things are moving on climate – some even in the right direction | Adam Morton

If you’re searching for some hope on the climate crisis before the Cop28 UN meeting in Dubai this month, try this: China may be changing direction on pollution earlier than expected. Lauri Myllyvirta, a longtime China analyst now with the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air, calculated that CO2 emissions from the world’s biggest national polluter are likely to fall next year and could then go into “structural decline”. While the country’s emissions have increased this year – unsurprisingly, given that Beijing lifted zero-Covid controls at the end of 2022 – the more important news is its record growth in clean energy capacity. The expansion is on a scale large enough to more than meet its increasing demand. Approval and construction of coal power plants also continues to expand but China has a history of building far more than it needs – its coal fleet runs at less than 50% capacity. Myllyvirta forecasts a permanent change may be under way as clean energy interest groups emerge to rival the traditionally powerful fossil fuel …

The Guardian view on Labour’s rethink on the right to roam: a step in the wrong direction | Editorial

During a recent House of Commons debate on public access to nature, MPs on both sides of the aisle seized the opportunity to indulge in a spot of bucolic lyricism. William Wordsworth, John Keats, Laurie Lee, John Constable and Beatrix Potter were among those mentioned in dispatches. But the most significant intervention was made by the then shadow minister for nature, Alex Sobel. A future Labour government, said Mr Sobel, would introduce Scottish-style right-to-roam legislation in England, vastly expanding access to woods, rivers and grasslands. Labour would offer people “the right to experience, the right to enjoy and the right to explore”. In a country where the right to roam currently applies to only 8% of land, this was an approach that was true to the party’s long tradition of campaigning for wider access to the countryside. It is also one which has huge popular support. The news that a policy U-turn is apparently under way is therefore surprising and disappointing. Speaking to the Guardian last week, Labour sources referenced the importance of respecting the …

Assassin’s Creed Mirage review – a stripped-back stab in the right direction | Games

Most canals that cut through ninth-century Baghdad are a muddy brown, thick with the silt churned up by the poles of passing punts. But there’s one inlet in the city where the water is stained red, a persistent crimson cloud that doesn’t shift with the stream’s eddies. Follow the red-running gutters through the sidestreets shouldered by clay-brick houses, and you’ll find not an abattoir but a dye factory. Between lines of fabrics hung up to dry, workers sweat as they stir cloth in great pots of coloured water, occasionally stopping to mop their brows. It’s an arresting sight, one of the many that litter Ubisoft’s latest open-world stab ’em up, Assassin’s Creed Mirage. Set in the years preceding the Viking-flavoured Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, Mirage puts you in the foot wraps of pickpocket-turned-hitman-in-training Basim Ibn Ishaq. After a palace burglary goes wrong, you are forced to flee your village and join The Hidden Ones, taking up their fight against The Order, a secretive club who are worming their way into Baghdad’s upper echelons of power. While …

‘The right direction’: LTA chief Scott Lloyd says British tennis is on the up | Wimbledon 2023

The Lawn Tennis Association has insisted British tennis is heading in the right direction a decade since Andy Murray’s first Wimbledon win – although it concedes that more needs to be done. Speaking exclusively to the Guardian, the LTA chief executive, Scott Lloyd, pointed out that Britain now had more players in the top 200 than at any time in the last 40 years – and was also the only country, apart from Spain, to have produced both male and female grand slam singles champions in the past decade. On the eve of Murray’s first-round Wimbledon match against the British No 7 Ryan Peniston, Lloyd also claimed the grassroots game was booming, with 10% of the country picking up a racket at least once a year. “In 2013, Andy was the only British male player in the top 200 in the world,” he said. “Recently we’ve had four men in the top 50 in the world. In 2013 we had three women in the top 150, now we have double that number. Overall, during the …

Users react to queer dating app’s new direction

Users react to queer dating app’s new direction

Lex, the hookup and social app that launched in 2019 with a nod to lesbian personal ads from the 80s, is changing. Only, precisely how much will change is still an open question. Sure, the venture-backed startup behind the queer app gave it a new lick of paint last week, but in refocusing on “friends and community,” some users fear that Lex will also scrub away its beloved, raunchy essence. Home to personals both horny and wholesome, the text-based service grew over the past few years into a queer community newspaper of sorts — a place for women, trans, genderqueer and non-binary people to announce meetups, find concert tickets, share poetry, crack in-jokes or simply cruise. Given its breadth and silliness, the app inspires smiles and eye-rolls alike among queer folks in my orbit. Lex satisfies a need that is typically shunned by mainstream tech; Craigslist, which famously upended the newspaper classifieds business, shuttered its online personals feature a year before Lex launched. Social giants like Meta and TikTok, meanwhile, take a largely puritanical attitude …