All posts tagged: Vanity Fair

Truman Capote’s Ultimate Weapon – The Atlantic

Truman Capote’s Ultimate Weapon – The Atlantic

[ad_1] Early in FX’s Feud: Capote vs. the Swans, the titular author (played by Tom Hollander) bursts into the palatial apartment of a high-society doyenne. “Tell me everything, from the beginning,” Truman Capote proclaims. A tearful Babe Paley (Naomi Watts) shares that her husband, the CBS impresario Bill Paley, has committed a grave indignity. Not only did he bring one of his flagrant affairs into their home, but his menstruating lover also left behind obvious evidence of her presence on the bedsheets. Capote lends Babe an ear and a shoulder to weep on, ultimately advising her not to get a divorce. The two have a laugh and Capote hands her a Valium to wash down with scotch. This scene sets up the central tension of Feud: Capote’s friendship with, and layer betrayal of, Babe and other wealthy women he’d become close with. Published in Esquire in 1975, Capote’s novel excerpt “La Côte Basque, 1965” divulged a trove of secrets that he’d been told by these women—the so-called Swans. The article fractured polite society and permanently …

Take Crossword Puzzles Seriously – The Atlantic

Take Crossword Puzzles Seriously – The Atlantic

[ad_1] This past December, I threw a party to celebrate a major milestone in my life: the 1,000th day of my New York Times crossword-solving streak. My friends, none of them fellow cruciverbalists, poured in wearing their black-and-white best, armed with outsize praise for my presumed intelligence: How smart I must be to complete the Times puzzle every day! Their comments affirmed that the crossword—and particularly the Times one—carries a certain mystique. For 1,000 consecutive days, I had passed this bourgeois aptitude test, proving my linguistic and cultural acumen in my guests’ eyes. Since its invention in 1913, the modern American crossword puzzle has undergone something of a reputational shift, from frivolous distraction to status symbol. In reality, the crossword is many things: a site of play, a cultural forum, a daily pleasure. And, because it traffics in language—the stuff people use to form identity, signal belonging, and ostracize others—it’s also a political entity. The writer and crossword constructor Anna Shechtman knows that casting such a pastime as political might sound ridiculous. As she writes …

Take Crossword Puzzles Seriously – The Atlantic

Take Crossword Puzzles Seriously – The Atlantic

[ad_1] This past December, I threw a party to celebrate a major milestone in my life: the 1,000th day of my New York Times crossword-solving streak. My friends, none of them fellow cruciverbalists, poured in wearing their black-and-white best, armed with outsize praise for my presumed intelligence: How smart I must be to complete the Times puzzle every day! Their comments affirmed that the crossword—and particularly the Times one—carries a certain mystique. For 1,000 consecutive days, I had passed this bourgeois aptitude test, proving my linguistic and cultural acumen in my guests’ eyes. Since its invention in 1913, the modern American crossword puzzle has undergone something of a reputational shift, from frivolous distraction to status symbol. In reality, the crossword is many things: a site of play, a cultural forum, a daily pleasure. And, because it traffics in language—the stuff people use to form identity, signal belonging, and ostracize others—it’s also a political entity. The writer and crossword constructor Anna Shechtman knows that casting such a pastime as political might sound ridiculous. As she writes …

The Everlasting KitchenAid Stand Mixer

The Everlasting KitchenAid Stand Mixer

[ad_1] My KitchenAid stand mixer is older than I am. My dad bought the white-enameled machine 35 years ago, during a brief first marriage. The bits of batter crusted into its cracks could be from the pasta I made yesterday or from the bread he made then. I learned to make my grandfather’s crunchy molasses gingersnaps in that stand mixer. In it, I creamed butter and sugar for the first time. Millions of stand mixers with stories like mine are scattered across the globe, sitting on counters in family homes since who knows when. The Smithsonian National Museum of American History displays Julia Child’s cobalt-enameled mixer in its re-creation of her kitchen; when Julia traveled for a cooking demonstration, she demanded that a KitchenAid be provided. If you buy the popular Artisan model today, your new appliance will look quite similar to the 1937 model designed by Egmont Arens: solid zinc base, enamel coating, arched overhang, a little cap for attachments on the face, room for a bowl to slot into its cradled arm. Inserting …

Carbone London: what to expect from someone who’s eaten at the New York original

Carbone London: what to expect from someone who’s eaten at the New York original

[ad_1] Bookings, I fear, will be Devonshire-esque. That is to say, extremely difficult to get — just as they are in New York, where people flock to enjoy spicy rigatoni on colourful patterned plates on white tablecloths. Visit the restaurant website and try to make a booking now. You are unlikely to succeed. The fact is, getting anywhere near a table is notoriously difficult. The New Yorker published a piece not so long ago about how to get one, in which the author talked about a “secret” email, one they described as difficult to come by. I managed. How? Was it from Barry from EastEnders? I cannot possibly say. All you need to know is I got a spot somewhere near the bar, in the thrum of things, at 8.15pm. And so I know a little of what London might expect. [ad_2] Source link