All posts tagged: spending time

Kierkegaard’s Three Ways to Live More Fully

Kierkegaard’s Three Ways to Live More Fully

[ad_1] Want to stay current with Arthur’s writing? Sign up to get an email every time a new column comes out. People hate being bored. Researchers show that we will go to almost any length to avoid boredom. That can even include giving ourselves painful electrical shocks to stave off ennui—experiments have found that many college-age subjects will actually do this rather than face as little as 15 minutes of doing nothing. Indeed, one of the worst parts of life for many people during the COVID-19 lockdowns was the sheer boredom of being stuck at home, which scholars have shown was associated with substance use, distress, and loneliness. Almost nothing is worse, then, than realizing that your life itself has become boring. Perhaps you have at one time or another concluded that your work is drudgery, your hobbies humdrum; that even your relationships are superficial and unsatisfying. Each day reminds you of the one before. What is there to do? One obvious answer is to run away, to throw out the old routines and connections, …

What to Read If You Want to Reinvent Yourself

What to Read If You Want to Reinvent Yourself

[ad_1] A new calendar year frequently conjures up visions of radical self-transformation. This year, we tell ourselves, will be the one where we finally lose 20 pounds, take up gratitude journaling, or read 100 books. New year, new you! But then inertia slowly creeps in, inconveniences arise, and by June our New Year’s resolutions are a distant memory. Changing oneself is harder than perky how-to guides and self-help books suggest. The genre is so popular because its titles briefly allow us to imagine that reinvention is a matter of performing specific actions, rather than an ongoing battle with our own recalcitrant nature. This is also precisely why their advice often doesn’t stick: The first step should be attempting to understand the self you’re trying to change. The books below, by contrast, are honest about the difficult emotional realities that accompany personal growth—discouragement, self-recrimination, fear of the unknown—and still offer hope. In depicting people grappling with unpredictable tragedies, the effects of aging, or even, as one memoir details, the fall of communism in a Balkan state, …

How to Be Happy Growing Older

How to Be Happy Growing Older

[ad_1] Want to stay current with Arthur’s writing? Sign up to get an email every time a new column comes out. Next to one’s birthday, the passing of the calendar year induces us to reflect on the march of time in our life. This is not a welcome subject for many—which is perhaps why a lot of people simply redefine old age virtually out of existence. When Americans were asked in 2009 what “being old” means, the most popular response was turning 85. Yet the average life span in the United States in 2022 was only 76. Apparently, then, the average American dies nine years before getting old. The impulse to define old age as “older than I am now” is not surprising, given all the ways our culture worships youth—its beauty, vitality, and entrepreneurial energy—and offers us any number of options for spending time and money to stop or slow down the clock of aging. And as if the adulation of youth weren’t enough, the stigmatization of seniors is always at hand, through overt …

How teens spend their free time

How teens spend their free time

[ad_1] “I’ll take my kid playing PlayStation all night over getting drunk and driving around, that’s for sure,” one reader says. Illustration by The Atlantic. Source: Archive Photos / Getty. December 22, 2023, 10:35 AM ET Welcome to Up for Debate. Each week, Conor Friedersdorf rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week Since you’ve gamely indulged my inquiries all year, it’s only fair that I give you a chance to ask me anything––pose a question about any issue under the sun, any article I’ve written or argument I’ve made, or any subject at all that you’d like to see me think through. When I answer, space will be limited, so keep your questions short enough for me to reprint them as prompts. Send your responses to [email protected] or simply reply to this email. Conversations of Note In a bygone newsletter, I asked, “How much time did you spend with peers in adolescence, and what …

Let Them Cook – The Atlantic

Let Them Cook – The Atlantic

[ad_1] The Joy of Cooking, one of the most popular cookbooks in American history, entered kitchens in 1931 with a simple premise: Anyone can learn to make a meal. The Depression had disrupted the food supply, leaving a generation of new homemakers doubting their ability to furnish healthy, varied dishes from sparse pantries. The book’s popularity lay in author Irma Rombauer’s approachable, if I can do this, you can too tone, an attitude that would help change how everyday Americans made dinner. Nearly a century later, another generation of young cooks has faced another global catastrophe, and emerged with their own relationship to cooking. While the coronavirus pandemic sent millions of Americans away from restaurants and into their kitchens, its culinary impact was formative for Gen Z, many of whom were in their teens or early 20s when it began. Whether stuck in their parents’ homes or on their own, these young people embraced cooking as an act of independence and, as one researcher told me, coping. On TikTok, cooking tutorials have hundreds of millions …