All posts tagged: SpaceXs

NASA Releases New Render of SpaceX’s Starship Landed on the Moon’s Surface

NASA Releases New Render of SpaceX’s Starship Landed on the Moon’s Surface

Is that a Moon rover hanging outside of the rocket? Lunar Delivery NASA is still hoping to carefully lower astronauts to the lunar surface from a SpaceX Starship, marking humanity’s triumphant return after over half a century. At least, that’s according to the plan as it currently stands. As part of its Artemis 3 mission, NASA is looking to launch a crew of four to the Moon as early as 2026 onboard its Orion capsule and then make its descent to the surface in a Starship. Around five years later, NASA wants to leverage the help of both SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’ space company Blue Origin to ferry cargo landers to the lunar surface. While the mission, dubbed Artemis 7, is slated for no earlier than 2031, the space agency is already digging in. A number of recently released renders show off both Blue Origin’s proposed cargo lander as well as SpaceX’s Starship lowering a Moon rover to the surface with the help of an exterior elevator. It’s a fascinating glimpse of what our future …

Experts Suggest Using SpaceX’s Starship to Rescue Stranded Samples on Surface of Mars

Experts Suggest Using SpaceX’s Starship to Rescue Stranded Samples on Surface of Mars

“You could probably just roll Perseverance into Starship and fly back to Earth.” Knight in Stainless Armor NASA’s highly ambitious Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission is on thin ice. An independent review board balked last year at the Mars Sample Return mission’s “unrealistic” budget, highly complex mission design, and glaring management failures. Earlier this year, budget cuts forced the agency’s Jet Propulsion Lab to let go of a whopping 530 employees, with NASA leaders racing to keep the MSR mission from imploding completely. The space agency announced this week that it would solicit proposals from the private space industry for “innovative designs” to return Martian samples collected and bagged by its Perseverance rover over the last couple of years. And, as Scientific American reports, SpaceX’s mammoth Starship spacecraft may just fit the bill. “Starship has the potential to return serious tonnage from Mars within [around] five years,” SpaceX CEO Elon Musk suggested in a tweet earlier this week, responding to the announcement. Interplanetary Road Trip Planetary Society senior space policy adviser Casey Dreier told SA that …

SpaceX’s Starship created a volcano-like explosion in first launch

SpaceX’s Starship created a volcano-like explosion in first launch

Debris left by the explosion of the SpaceX Starship launch pad in Texas on 22 April 2023 UPI/Alamy Live News When SpaceX’s Starship rocket launched for the first time in 2023, it destroyed its launch pad in an explosion similar to a volcanic eruption that sent huge chunks of concrete high into the sky. Understanding the blast in detail could help us design more robust launch and landing pads for future missions to the moon and Mars. “It was eye-opening to us that launch pads could explode so violently,” says Philip Metzger… Source link

People Are Selling Chunks of SpaceX’s Exploded Starship on eBay

People Are Selling Chunks of SpaceX’s Exploded Starship on eBay

Recovered ceramic heat shield tiles, which are designed to keep SpaceX’s massive Starship cool during reentry into the Earth’s atmosphere, are selling for thousands of dollars on eBay — a lucrative secondary market for unique souvenirs that were once attached to the some of the largest humanmade objects to ever take flight. The Elon Musk-led company has attempted to launch three fully-stacked Starship prototypes into orbit so far. The first two attempts, in April and November of last year, ended in massive explosions, sending what remained of roughly 18,000 hexagonal ceramic tiles across the nearby beaches of South Texas each time. The third and latest orbital launch attempt last week saw the latest prototype make it into space, blast past the continent of Africa, and crash into the Indian Ocean. However, it’s still possible heat shields may have popped off during launch. “Got mine,” one lucky redditor wrote in a post last week after stumbling upon a perfectly preserved heat shield tile on a beach six miles north of SpaceX’s testing facilities in Boca Chica, Texas. “I’m …

SpaceX’s mega rocket lost on return to Earth after third test flight

SpaceX’s mega rocket lost on return to Earth after third test flight

SpaceX’s mega rocket blasted off on another test flight Thursday and made it farther than two previous attempts, but the spacecraft was lost as it descended back to Earth. Issued on: 14/03/2024 – 16:35 1 min The company said it lost contact with the spacecraft as it neared its goal, a splashdown in the Indian Ocean, about an hour after liftoff from the southern tip of Texas near the Mexican border. Two test flights last year both ended in explosions minutes after liftoff. Starship, the biggest and most powerful rocket ever built, headed out over the Gulf of Mexico after launch Thursday. Minutes later, the booster separated seamlessly from the spaceship and splashed down into the gulf and the spacecraft continued eastward. No people or satellites were on board. An hour later, SpaceX commentators said contact had been lost with the spacecraft. “The ship has been lost. So no splashdown today,” said SpaceX’s Dan Huot. “But again, it’s incredible to see how much further we got this time around.” Earlier during the flight, SpaceX’s Elon Musk …

SpaceX’s massive Starship launches successfully

SpaceX’s massive Starship launches successfully

The SpaceX Starship spacecraft lifts off from Starbase in Boca Chica, Texas, on Thursday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images The SpaceX Starship spacecraft lifts off from Starbase in Boca Chica, Texas, on Thursday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images SpaceX has successfully conducted a test launch of its massive Starship rocket. The rocket took off from the company’s Starbase facility in Boca Chica, Texas, at 9:25 a.m. ET. The liftoff was smooth, as all 33 of the Starship’s “Super Heavy” booster engines fired in synchrony. The giant rocket lumbered off the pad, climbed out over the Gulf of Mexico and then the Starship separated cleanly from the booster and proceeded to orbit, where it began a series of in-flight tests. Starship’s Super Heavy booster appears to have been lost shortly before landing in the Gulf. Meanwhile, Starship itself had a smooth ride into space. It broadcast video from high above the Earth, using its Starlink satellite network. The video also captured the beginning of the spacecraft’s re-entry …

What is SpaceX’s Starship? – The New York Times

What is SpaceX’s Starship? – The New York Times

For Elon Musk, Starship is really a Mars ship. He envisions a fleet of Starships carrying settlers to the red planet in the coming years. And for that eventual purpose, Starship, under development by Mr. Musk’s SpaceX rocket company, has to be big. Stacked on top of what SpaceX calls a Super Heavy booster, the Starship rocket system will be, by pretty much every measure, the biggest and most powerful ever. It is the tallest rocket ever built — 397 feet tall, or about 90 feet taller than the Statue of Liberty including the pedestal. And it has the most engines ever in a rocket booster: The Super Heavy has 33 of SpaceX’s powerful Raptor engines sticking out of its bottom. As those engines lift Starship off the launchpad in South Texas, they will generate 16 million pounds of thrust at full throttle. NASA’s new Space Launch System rocket, which made its first flight in November 2022, holds the current record for the maximum thrust of a rocket: 8.8 million pounds. The maximum thrust of …

FAA completes investigation into SpaceX’s second fiery Starship test

FAA completes investigation into SpaceX’s second fiery Starship test

The Federal Aviation Administration has concluded its review of SpaceX’s investigation of the second Starship launch in November, with the regulator saying Monday that it accepted the “root causes and 17 corrective actions” identified by the company. While this means the investigation is now closed, SpaceX must implement all the corrective actions and apply for a modified launch license before it can fly Starship again. “The FAA is evaluating SpaceX’s license modification request and expects SpaceX to submit additional required information before a final determination can be made,” the regulator said in a statement Monday. SpaceX’s second orbital flight test of the nearly 400-foot-tall Starship rocket in November went farther than the first test by a huge margin: all 33 of the Raptor engines on the Super Heavy booster powered on successfully and none failed in the course of the nearly three-minute ascent burn. The company also pulled off a spectacularly difficult “hot-stage separation” for the first time, wherein the Starship upper stage lit up to push away from the booster. But like the first …

NASA astronauts test SpaceX’s crucial moon elevator

NASA astronauts test SpaceX’s crucial moon elevator

It sounds like a joke or the stuff of a children’s fantasy novel: taking an elevator to the moon. But that’s how astronauts plan to get from their spaceship to the lunar surface, and back, in a few years when NASA returns to the moon for Artemis missions III and IV. The elevator is part of SpaceX’s Starship human landing system, which will not only carry two crew members to the moon but serve as their home for about a week while they explore the south pole, a dark and cold region where scientists believe water ice is buried in craters. The natural resource is coveted because it could supply drinking water, oxygen, and rocket fuel for future missions, ushering a new era in spaceflight. NASA astronauts Nicole Mann and Doug Wheelock recently tested a small mockup of the elevator — a crucial element to SpaceX’s solution for getting humans from space to the moon’s surface. This lift will be the portal from which the first woman and person of color step onto the moon. …

Max Q: SpaceX’s mega-rocket for the moon and Mars goes farther than ever before

Max Q: SpaceX’s mega-rocket for the moon and Mars goes farther than ever before

Hello and welcome back to Max Q! What an incredible weekend, folks. And no, I’m not talking about the OpenAI drama. If you’re a subscriber to Max Q, you know exactly what I’m referring to — STARSHIP. My jaw was on the floor the entire time. In this issue: More on Starship’s second launch News from Blackshark.ai and more SpaceX flew Starship, the most powerful rocket ever built, for the second time today — and even though both the Super Heavy booster and the Starship upper stage had to be blown up in mid-air, it was still a huge success for the company best known for taking a rapidly iterative approach to hardware development. Rewatch the launch here: Watch Starship’s second integrated flight test → https://t.co/bJFjLCiTbK https://t.co/cahoRQ72lm — SpaceX (@SpaceX) November 18, 2023 More news from across TC Blackshark.ai has already made a digital twin of the Earth, and its next play further democratizes the hitherto lofty (if you will) world of geospatial intelligence. ispace will make its second attempt at putting a lander on the moon …