All posts tagged: simians

Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes review – future simians swing through cinematic jungle | Film

Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes review – future simians swing through cinematic jungle | Film

After four ambitious and successful pictures, the reboot-prequel Planet of the Apes franchise now comes to what could well be the end, approaching the moment at which Charlton Heston and his crew crash landed, in 3978, in the original movie. It’s where, in 1968, we came in. Of course, if this one is a big hit, yet another prequel-episode could theoretically be squeezed in. But I hope not. It’s not that this movie is running low on energy or panache – it isn’t – but the story is tangled and contrived and weirdly anticlimactic because that original film is starting to loom over everything like the Statue of Liberty’s shadow. All that happens has to match up with what we know is coming. There have to be “good” apes we can root for, but also “bad” apes to make sense of the original’s imminent ape tyranny. There have to be “good” humans for the “good” apes to have a relatable relationship with – but they have to exhibit “bad” or anti-ape tendencies to align with …

Go ape! Killer simians in cinema – ranked! | Film

Go ape! Killer simians in cinema – ranked! | Film

20. Night of the Bloody Apes (1969) Despite the English title, there’s only one “ape” in this cheesy slice of Mexploitation, once labelled a video nasty. A mad doctor transplants the heart of a gorilla into his dying son; the youth turns into a homicidal simian creep who sexually assaults women. Also features a lady luchador. Ouch … Joe Cornelius in Trog. Photograph: Everett Collection Inc/Alamy 19. Trog (1970) Joan Crawford, allegedly fuelled by vodka, gives it her all in her final film role: as an anthropologist studying a troglodyte, played by an actor in a leftover ape suit from 2001: A Space Odyssey. Inevitably, the creature goes on a killing spree. Camp as a row of tents, but oddly endearing. 18. Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972) The third sequel to the 1968 film jumps back in time to 1991, when humans are dominant and apes are enslaved. A talking chimp called Caesar (Roddy McDowall) leads the resistance in a heavy-handed and frankly somewhat questionable allegory of the civil rights movement. Meet …