All posts tagged: seas

Save our seas: five ways to rewild and conserve the ocean | Oceans

Save our seas: five ways to rewild and conserve the ocean | Oceans

1. Give nature a helping hand by reintroducing species Some ocean species and habitats struggle to recover on their own and need help. Take sea otters, which were virtually eliminated by the end of the 19th century by commercial hunting for their super-dense pelts. From the 1960s to 1990, some sea otters were moved to repopulate places where they had once lived. Today there are about 150,000 sea otters in the wild and a third of them are descended from translocated otters. Sunflower sea stars (Pycnopodia helianthoides) can grow to the size of bike wheels. After disease devastated their populations, scientists began to breed them in aquariums. Photograph: naturediver/Getty/iStockphoto The US Fish and Wildlife Service is now considering moving more otters to fill in the gaps, including along the coast north of San Francisco. The motivation for this is partly because otters can help keep entire ecosystems healthy. Without otters to keep their numbers down, sea urchin populations explode and kelp forests become grazed down to the seabed. When otters returned to Alaska and British …

Gaza Pier Delayed Over Rough Seas, Pentagon Calls Project “Extremely Challenging”

Gaza Pier Delayed Over Rough Seas, Pentagon Calls Project “Extremely Challenging”

This week has seen statements and reports indicating the US military constructed humanitarian pier on Gaza’s coast is expected to be complete by some point this weekend.  But the $320 million project has hit another snag, as the Pentagon has said its soldiers and engineers were forced to “temporarily pause” the offshore assembly of the floating pier due to bad sea conditions in the eastern Mediterranean. So a finish date by this weekend appears unrealistic at this point, based on the Friday announcement. US Navy personnel construct a ‘Joint Logistics Over-the Shore’ temporary pier. Image: CENTCOM via Reuters “The partially built pier and military vessels involved in its construction have moved to the Port of Ashdod, where assembly will continue, and will be completed prior to the emplacement of the pier in its intended location when sea states subside,” CENTCOM said in a statement.  So now the US personnel constructing it have moved to Israel. Presumably once the floating pier is completed it will be moved by sea back to the northern Gaza coast in …

Stormy seas pause construction of Gaza pier, Pentagon says

Stormy seas pause construction of Gaza pier, Pentagon says

The U.S. military had to pause its project of building a pier off the coast of Gaza to deliver humanitarian due to bad weather, the Pentagon said Friday. U.S. Central Command officials “temporarily paused offshore assembly of the floating pier” off the coast of Gaza after high winds and sea swells caused unsafe conditions for soldiers working on the surface of the partially constructed causeway, the command said in a statement. “The partially built pier and military vessels involved in its construction have moved to the Port of Ashdod,” in Israel, where assembly will continue. As many as 1,000 American service members are helping set up the floating pier in the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Gaza, a project that the Pentagon has initially estimated will cost $320 million. Announced during President Biden’s State of the Union address in March, the structure will consist of an 1,800-foot-long causeway that will be attached to the shore and is meant to support the U.S. government and its partners in getting more humanitarian aid to civilians in the …

In Search of America Aboard the Icon of the Seas

In Search of America Aboard the Icon of the Seas

In January, the writer Gary Shteyngart spent a week of his life on the inaugural voyage of the Icon of the Seas, the largest cruise ship ever. Like many a great novelist before him, he went in search of the “real” America. He left his Russian novels at home, bought some novelty T-shirts, and psychically prepared to be the life of the party. About halfway through, Shteyngart called his editor and begged to be allowed to disembark and fly home. His desperate plea was rejected, resulting in a semi-sarcastic daily log of his misery. In this episode of Radio Atlantic, Shteyngart discusses his “seven agonizing nights” on the cruise ship, where he roamed from mall to bar to infinity pool trying to make friends. He shares his theories about why cruise lovers nurture an almost spiritual devotion to an experience that, to him, inspires material for a “low-rent White Lotus.” And he shares what happened when cruise lovers actually read what he wrote about their beloved ship. Listen to the conversation here: Subscribe here: Apple …

At G7 Meeting in Capri, Blinken Tackles Rough Seas and Global Crises

At G7 Meeting in Capri, Blinken Tackles Rough Seas and Global Crises

Rough seas were a fitting symbol for this week’s meeting of Group of 7 foreign ministers on the Italian island of Capri. Coast Guard ships that ferried V.I.P.s across the Gulf of Naples to the island on Wednesday swayed precariously, leaving the passengers reaching for their motion-sickness medicine — and, in some cases, their sick bags. Though no ministers from this elite international coalition, including Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken, were known to have lost their lunch, the global problems they confronted were enough to make even a seasoned diplomat queasy: the risk of war between Iran and Israel, the nightmare in Gaza and Ukraine’s uncertain fate. At the luxurious Grand Hotel Quisisana, Mr. Blinken came determined to project unity within a group that includes Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United States and the European Union. First created to help stabilize the world economy, the G7 has grown more active and ambitious in recent years, seeking to shape geopolitics and to be “a steering committee for the world’s most advanced democracies,” as …

Maserati Takes To The Seas With Electric Zero Emissions Powerboat

Maserati Takes To The Seas With Electric Zero Emissions Powerboat

France 24 How Israel could respond to Iran’s drone and missile assault Although the US has said that it would not take part in any retaliatory strike from Israel in response to Iran’s largely thwarted salvo over the weekend, the Biden administration’s “ironclad” support for the country could still prompt Israel to launch a direct attack on Iranian soil – with potentially disastrous results. As rank after rank of soldiers marched by, Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi surveyed his troops and spoke of victory. In a speech delivered to members of the country’s armed forc Source link

Dumping green sand in shallow seas could let them absorb more CO2

Dumping green sand in shallow seas could let them absorb more CO2

Olivine sands can be found on some beaches in Hawaii Sara Komo/Shutterstock Dumping alkaline green sand into shallow seas could increase ocean absorption of carbon dioxide by 8 per cent this century, according to a modelling study. Oceans take up almost a third of the CO2 we emit into the atmosphere and researchers are exploring ways to boost that amount. Dissolving 1 gigatonne a year of ground-up olivine, a common, greenish mineral made mainly of magnesium, iron, silicon and oxygen, in shallow seas could reduce atmospheric CO2 levels by 10 parts per million (ppm) by 2100, Andrew Yool and Julien Palmiéri at the UK’s National Oceanography Centre have found. This would lower Earth’s average temperature by 0.06°C, they estimate. Atmospheric CO2 is currently at 423 ppm and would reach 1200 ppm by 2100 in the high-emissions scenario the pair modelled. But the study suggests that if we cut emissions from most sectors, olivine deployment in a few key locations could help compensate for hard-to-abate sectors like steel-making or air travel, says Yool. “It’s doable. [Olivine] …

The Icon of the Seas Will Not Countenance a Shrug

The Icon of the Seas Will Not Countenance a Shrug

Day 1 MY FIRST GLIMPSE of Royal Caribbean’s Icon of the Seas, from the window of an approaching Miami cab, brings on a feeling of vertigo, nausea, amazement, and distress. I shut my eyes in defense, as my brain tells my optical nerve to try again. The ship makes no sense, vertically or horizontally. It makes no sense on sea, or on land, or in outer space. It looks like a hodgepodge of domes and minarets, tubes and canopies, like Istanbul had it been designed by idiots. Vibrant, oversignifying colors are stacked upon other such colors, decks perched over still more decks; the only comfort is a row of lifeboats ringing its perimeter. There is no imposed order, no cogent thought, and, for those who do not harbor a totalitarian sense of gigantomania, no visual mercy. This is the biggest cruise ship ever built, and I have been tasked with witnessing its inaugural voyage. Explore the May 2024 Issue Check out more from this issue and find your next story to read. View More “Author …

No crops, no brides: how rising seas are killing India’s coastal villages | Migration and development

No crops, no brides: how rising seas are killing India’s coastal villages | Migration and development

In Udaykani, a coastal village in the east Indian state of Odisha, the walls of houses were once adorned with the marriage motifs of conches and shehnais, an oboe-like instrument played at weddings, considered auspicious for bride and groom. Today, the designs have faded. The village, once a hub of joyous celebrations, has not welcomed a bride in more than a decade. With the sea on one side and fields on the other, Udaykani, along with neighbouring Tandahar village, was hit hard by a super-cyclone, the most intense ever recorded in the northern Indian Ocean, that lashed the state 25 years ago. Along with the growing environmental volatility of the Bay of Bengal over the years, it has meant a rise in soil and water salinity and subsequent loss of agricultural land, livelihoods and marriage prospects. “When the soil turned salty, our crops shrivelled,” says Vaidehi Kardi, 64, a Tandahar resident. “Gradually, the water too turned salty and our lives withered. It has become difficult to get our sons married. Everyone feels our village is …

China seas: A new Cold War brewing?

China seas: A new Cold War brewing?

Back to homepage / Shows / Reporters Issued on: 08/03/2024 – 11:49 43:51 Reporters © FRANCE 24 By: Constantin SIMON | Aruna POPURI Long dominated by the United States, the Asia-Pacific region is grappling with an increasingly assertive China. Tensions are mounting around Taiwan and in the South China Sea, both in the air and on the water, with numerous incidents of late involving Chinese fighter planes, collisions between ships and reefs being turned into military outposts. Filmed in Japan, China, Taiwan and the Philippines, our documentary explores a new “cold war” pitting President Xi Jinping’s authoritarian China against the US and its democratic allies in the region. This high-stakes conflict encompasses territorial, political, economic and ideological dimensions, as the threat of a third world war looms on the horizon.  Read more on related topics: Source link