All posts tagged: presidential election

Donald Trump back in the White House is good for Britain and the world, says Liz Truss | Politics | News

Donald Trump back in the White House is good for Britain and the world, says Liz Truss | Politics | News

Liz Truss has endorsed Donald Trump “or whoever the Republicans choose as their nominee” as the next US President and said the values he would bring to the White House are what the world needs. The former Prime Minister spoke exclusively to Express.co.uk at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington DC where she was the star attraction of the first day of the four-day event. Asked if she wanted to see Trump back in the White House she said: “Yes”. But wth Nikki Haley still in the race, she qualified it by saying: “I want whoever the Republicans choose, I have done enough blue on blue at home to not want to get involved with red on red for the Republicans in America.” She explained: “I think first of all that we need peace through strength and I think that is where what we would see if the Republicans get back in and also, I think the Republicans are more pro-Britain than Democrats.” Speaking about what she likes about the much tougher for …

Fani Willis Should Step Aside

Fani Willis Should Step Aside

After a two-day hearing in Fulton County, Georgia, we are where we were before. The defendants, charged by Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis with conspiring to overturn the 2020 presidential election, attempted to make a case for her disqualification under Georgia law. In my view, they failed. The standard for disqualification has not been met, and the judge should not disqualify Willis. But that is not the end of it. Willis is a public servant obligated to discharge the duties of her office in accordance with the best interest of the people of Georgia. In this instance, the best interest of the public dictates that she withdraw from prosecuting the case. As Norman Eisen, Joyce Vance, and I explained in detail before this week’s hearing, a conflict of interest disqualifies a prosecutor from a case only when the prosecutor’s conflict could prejudice the defendant. None of the factual allegations made by the defendants support an inference that such prejudice could exist in this case. In fact, the defendants are enjoying every minute of this …

Biden’s Age Was Always Going to Become a Problem

Biden’s Age Was Always Going to Become a Problem

As an outsider observing the U.S. presidential election, I have been wondering for months when Joe Biden’s age would become a thing. Biden is 81 already—the oldest person ever to occupy the White House—and is seeking another four-year term. He is older than George W. Bush, who stopped being president in 2008, and older than Bill Clinton, who gave up the job in 2000. He is older than the hovercraft, the barcode, and the Breathalyzer. And he looks it: Biden’s likely Republican opponent, Donald Trump, a mere debutant at 77, is possessed with a bronzed, demonic energy that makes him seem vigorously alive, even when his words make no sense. Joe Biden looks like he is turning into a statue of Joe Biden. Already this week, I have seen clips of him confusing current French President Emmanuel Macron with former (and now dead) President François Mitterrand, and read about his claim to have discussed the European response to the January 6 insurrection with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl. The latter would have required a Ouija board, …

Joe Biden comfortably wins Nevada Democratic primary as Nikki Haley humiliated | US | News

Joe Biden comfortably wins Nevada Democratic primary as Nikki Haley humiliated | US | News

Joe Biden has comfortably won Nevada’s Democratic primary as widely expected. The president, 81, was up against author and motivational speaker Marianne Williamson, who also ran in 2020, and entrepreneur Gabriel Cornejo. Biden’s victory comes days after he won South Carolina’s first-in-the-South Democratic primary with 96.2 percent of the vote. The incumbent president was expected to win Tuesday’s contest, which saw low turnout as voters were confused about the brand new primary system that replaced the decades-old caucuses. The night has not gone as smoothly for Nikki Haley, unrivalled by absent Donald Trump in the Republican Primary. Haley lost to ‘None of These Candidates’ by a huge margin, with the race called after just 50 percent of the votes were counted. Pro-Trump Republicans were expected to turn out and vote against Haley in the ballot – and this appears to have materialized. READ MORE: ‘Angry’ locals skip Nevada vote as Haley and Biden fail to inspire Tuesday began with lower-than-expected voter turnout. In Washoe County, the state’s second-largest county by population, only 183 people voted in the firt two …

An Appeals Court Denies Trump Criminal Immunity

An Appeals Court Denies Trump Criminal Immunity

A federal appeals court has rejected Trump’s claim of absolute immunity from criminal prosecution—and rightly so. Chip Somodevilla / Getty February 6, 2024, 12:09 PM ET A federal appeals court ruled today that former President Donald Trump is not immune from criminal prosecution for his actions following the 2020 presidential election, upholding the basic principle that no American is above the law. “We cannot accept former President Trump’s claim that a President has unbounded authority to commit crimes that would neutralize the most fundamental check on executive power—the recognition and implementation of election results,” the D.C. Circuit Court’s unsigned, unanimous opinion states. David A. Graham: A thought experiment about SEAL Team 6 goes terribly, terribly wrong It’s the sort of ruling that might have seemed superfluous not very long ago: Essential ideas about American government have long presupposed that the president, like every other citizen, can be punished if he commits crimes. Although the court makes that explicit, and clears the way (for now) for Trump’s prosecution for attempted election subversion to proceed, it is …

The weirdest presidential election in history

The weirdest presidential election in history

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. We are heading into a rematch that promises to be weirder than any presidential election we’ve ever experienced. Let’s review where things stand. First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: Where Things Stand More than two years ago, I wrote my first newsletter for The Atlantic, titled “An Unserious Country.” I was worried. We’re facing a slew of challenges, from reinvigorated foreign enemies to a dedicated authoritarian movement at home. And yet, as a people, we and our elected officials seem unable to focus even for a nanosecond with enough seriousness and deliberation to muster the cooperative, can-do perseverance that once characterized the American spirit. I wrote this 10 months after the January 6 insurrection, around the same time we learned that thousands of people had died due to their refusal to accept the lifesaving vaccines against …

Uncancel Woodrow Wilson – The Atlantic

Uncancel Woodrow Wilson – The Atlantic

February marks a century since the death of Woodrow Wilson. Of all America’s presidents, none has suffered so rapid and total a reversal of reputation. Wilson championed—and came to symbolize—progressive reform at home and liberal internationalism abroad. So long as those causes commanded wide support, Wilson’s name resonated with the greats of American history. In our time, however, the American left has subordinated the causes of reform and internationalism to the politics of identity, while the American right has rejected reform and internationalism altogether. Wilson’s standing has been crushed in between. Explore the March 2024 Issue Check out more from this issue and find your next story to read. View More In 1948, and again in 1962, surveys of American historians rated Wilson fourth among American presidents, lagging behind only Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Wilson’s fellow presidents esteemed him too. Harry Truman wrote, “In many ways, Wilson was the greatest of the greats.” Richard Nixon admired Wilson even more extravagantly. He hung Wilson’s portrait in his Cabinet room, and used as …

Is American Journalism Headed Toward an ‘Extinction-Level Event’?

Is American Journalism Headed Toward an ‘Extinction-Level Event’?

For a few hours last Tuesday, the entire news business seemed to be collapsing all at once. Journalists at Time magazine and National Geographic announced that they had been laid off. Unionized employees at magazines owned by Condé Nast staged a one-day strike to protest imminent cuts. By far the grimmest news was from the Los Angeles Times, the biggest newspaper west of the Washington, D.C., area. After weeks of rumors, the paper announced that it was cutting 115 people, more than 20 percent of its newsroom. The Times was once a pillar of the American media establishment, celebrated in David Halberstam’s classic media study, The Powers That Be. Now it has become a national exemplar of what the journalist Margaret Sullivan calls the “ghosting” of the news—the gradual withering of news-gathering muscle as once-proud publications become shadows of their old selves. The biotech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong looked like a savior when he bought the Times from its cost-cutting corporate parent in 2018. For a few years, he was; Soon-Shiong invested about $1 billion, by …

White Families Sucked the Suburbs Dry

White Families Sucked the Suburbs Dry

Nearly 25 years ago, I reported on the changing demographics of Cicero, a working-class suburb just west of Chicago. For years, the town, which was made up mostly of Italian and Eastern European American families, worked hard at keeping Black people from settling there. In 1951, when a Black family moved in, a mob entered their apartment, tore it up, and pushed a piano out a window. Police watched and did nothing. The governor had to call out the National Guard. By 2000, the nearby factories, which were the economic foundation of the community, had begun to close. White families moved out and left behind a distressed, struggling town to its new residents—Latinos, who now made up three-quarters of the population. It felt wrong. It felt like the white families got to enjoy the prosperity of the place, and then left it to these newcomers to figure out how to repair aging infrastructure and make up for the lost tax revenues. After reading Benjamin Herold’s Disillusioned, I now realize I was witnessing something much larger: …