All posts tagged: prefrontal

Psilocybin therapy alters prefrontal and limbic brain circuitry in alcohol use disorder

Psilocybin therapy alters prefrontal and limbic brain circuitry in alcohol use disorder

A recent study published in Scientific Reports reveals new insights into how psilocybin-assisted therapy modifies brain function in people with alcohol use disorder (AUD). These changes suggest a potential mechanism behind the therapy’s success and could point toward new avenues for treatment. Psilocybin is the psychoactive compound found in certain species of mushrooms, often referred to as “magic mushrooms,” known for its ability to produce profound changes in consciousness, perception, and mood. Psilocybin-assisted therapy combines the administration of psilocybin with psychological support and therapeutic practices, aiming to leverage the compound’s unique effects to facilitate deep psychological insights and emotional processing. “A recent Phase II clinical trial in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD) found that psilocybin-assisted therapy significantly improved drinking outcomes for up to 8 months relative to an active placebo. The positive effects of this treatment were observed rapidly (as early as the day after treatment), large in magnitude, and sustained after only one to two applications,” said study author Broc Pagni, a cognitive neuroscientist and postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Psychedelic Medicine …

Children of anxious mothers have weaker prefrontal connectivity as adults, study finds

Children of anxious mothers have weaker prefrontal connectivity as adults, study finds

A neuroimaging study involving 28-year-olds in Belgium discovered that individuals with mothers who experienced higher levels of anxiety during pregnancy exhibited weaker functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and the left inferior frontal gyrus regions of the brain. This diminished connectivity could lead to challenges in emotional regulation, decision-making, and stress management. The findings were published in the journal Brain Imaging and Behavior. During the previous decade, many studies utilizing neuroimaging techniques reported links between maternal psychological distress or mental health issues during pregnancy and the characteristics of the brain of their children. Scientists propose that this might mean that mental health issues of mothers affect the development of the fetal brain, creating changes that last into adulthood. Of these mental health issues, anxiety and depression are the most common. A study in the UK estimated that treating anxiety and depression of mothers at the time of pregnancy costs the society around 8500 GBP per woman giving birth. Anxiety is a mental health condition characterized by persistent feelings of worry, fear, or tension, often …