All posts tagged: Oscar Wilde

The Weather Is Perfectly Interesting, Actually

The Weather Is Perfectly Interesting, Actually

Oscar Wilde never said that “conversation about the weather is the last refuge of the unimaginative.” Patrick Zachmann / Magnum February 20, 2024, 6 AM ET The other day, a colleague came by my desk to chat about the weather. The sky outside was dark and menacing, and the meteorologists, she told me with widening eyes, were predicting gale-force winds, a fact that we both found intriguing (what even qualifies as a gale?). We were having a perfectly nice conversation at the end of a long day, from my perspective. And then she ruined it. “Sorry,” she said. “I know talking about the weather is boring.” Many innocent people around the world suffer from this misapprehension. We are taught that discussing the weather is the epitome of meaningless drivel and the mark of a poor conversationalist, the vocal equivalent of a sign declaring I am an uninteresting person. But this stigma is based on a simple analytical error. In the paradigmatic example, two people, perhaps sharing an elevator or waiting for a bus, find themselves …

London bar recommendations by Liana Oster

London bar recommendations by Liana Oster

You need to start early here and take it slow, but Soho through to Covent Garden is such a lively part of the city. Everything is within walking distance and it covers all bases of bars, leaving room for more suggestions and stops as well.  My choice is Bar Termini (7 Old Compton Street, W1D 5JE, bar-termini-soho.com) to start off, followed by Swift Soho (12 Old Compton Street, W1D 4TQ, barswift.com), Atelier Coupette (9 Moor Street, W1D 5ND, coupette.co.uk), Wacky Wombat (Manette Street, W1D 4AL, @wacky.wombath), Scarfes Bar (Rosewood London, 252 High Holborn, WC1V 7EN, scarfesbar.com), Side Hustle (28 Bow Street, WC2E 7AW, thenomadhotel.com) then Stereo (35 The Piazza,WC2E 8BE, stereocoventgarden.com).  //www.instagram.com/embed.js Source link

How Uncovered Windows Became a Status Symbol

How Uncovered Windows Became a Status Symbol

Walk down the block of a wealthy neighborhood at night, and you might be surprised by how much you can see. One uncovered window might reveal the glow of a flatscreen TV across from a curved couch; through another, you might glimpse a marble kitchen island and a chandelier. Of course, some of the curtains are closed—but many are flung open, the home’s interiors exposed, like you’re peering into a showroom. Uncovered windows have quietly become a fixture of high-end homes across America. The New York Times recently referred to the “obligatory uncurtained windows” of Brooklyn Heights, a rich enclave in New York City, and The Root pointed out that this seemed common among wealthy young white people living in gentrified urban areas. On TikTok, onlookers have been baffled by the trend—and, sometimes, tempted to pry. Although this phenomenon is most visible in cities, the link between wealth and exposed windows extends across the United States. Most people do still close their shades, but Americans who earn more than $150,000 are almost twice as likely …