All posts tagged: one grown-ups

A Halloween Reading List for Adults

A Halloween Reading List for Adults

[ad_1] Channeling the joy of the most childish holiday Annie Otzen / Getty October 28, 2023, 8 AM ET This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. “I believe in chasing the ghost of my former lighthearted self,” my colleague Faith Hill wrote last year. And “if there’s one day when I might almost catch up, it’s Halloween: the most ridiculous, inherently childish holiday, and perhaps the one grown-ups need most.” As we get older, experiences of pure, full-body fun and joy become more fleeting. Faith argues that adult Halloween is the perfect opportunity to get in touch with that kind of fun, and the freedom it can yield: “When everyone is wearing a dumb outfit and surrounded by tacky decorations, you all withhold judgment together. You might even remember, just for a second, who you were as a young child: unencumbered by pretensions and insecurities, present …

Low stakes, high drama – The Atlantic

Low stakes, high drama – The Atlantic

[ad_1] Some of our writers’ most entertaining—and controversial—opinions on everyday matters Daniel Zender September 30, 2023, 10:33 AM ET This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. Saturn is the best planet. Hard seltzer is an abomination. Milk chocolate is better than dark. The “fun fact” should die. My colleagues at The Atlantic are skilled in the art of making a bold, well-researched argument. Those arguments are often about matters of societal importance, but they can also be about the less serious topics that make up our everyday lives. As my colleague Caroline Mimbs Nyce noted in 2017, the magazine has used “the case for” (or “the case against”) as a framing more than 200 times in its history, for arguments both serious and silly. (This neat interactive from 2017 allows you to browse the full collection up to that point.) For today’s newsletter, I asked my …