All posts tagged: NRA

NRA, Wayne LaPierre found liable in corruption case

NRA, Wayne LaPierre found liable in corruption case

[ad_1] Former NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre (second from right) leaves New York State Supreme Court on Wednesday. Top NRA executives for were accused of using millions in donations for private luxuries. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption toggle caption Frank Franklin II/AP Former NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre (second from right) leaves New York State Supreme Court on Wednesday. Top NRA executives for were accused of using millions in donations for private luxuries. Frank Franklin II/AP A Manhattan jury found three top executives of the National Rifle Association liable Friday in a lengthy civil trial that focused on alleged corruption and the misspending of millions of dollars. Longtime NRA leader Wayne LaPierre, a key architect in the nonprofit’s hardline gun rights agenda who stepped down as CEO last month, was central to the case brought by New York state Attorney General Letitia James. After a six week trial and a week of deliberations, a jurors found that LaPierre “violated his statutory obligation to discharge the duties of his position in good faith.” They concluded that he had …

NRA, Wayne LaPierre found liable in lawsuit over lavish spending

NRA, Wayne LaPierre found liable in lawsuit over lavish spending

[ad_1] NEW YORK (AP) — The longtime head of the National Rifle Association, Wayne LaPierre, misspent millions of dollars of the organization’s money, using the funds to pay for an extravagant lifestyle that included exotic getaways and trips on private planes and superyachts, a New York jury determined Friday. The jury found LaPierre, 74, must repay almost $4.4 million to the powerful gun rights group that he led for three decades, while the NRA’s retired finance chief, Wilson Phillips, owes $2 million. Jurors also found that the NRA failed to properly manage its assets, omitted or misrepresented information in its tax filings and violated whistleblower protections under New York law. LaPierre, who announced his resignation from the NRA on the eve of the trial, sat stone-faced in the front row of the courtroom as the verdict was read aloud, and did not speak to reporters on the way out. New York Attorney General Letitia James, a Democrat who campaigned on investigating the NRA’s not-for-profit status, declared the verdict a “major victory.” “In New York, you …

N.Y. Attorney General Letitia James takes on Trump and the NRA

N.Y. Attorney General Letitia James takes on Trump and the NRA

[ad_1] Letitia James promised to “take on” then-President Donald Trump when she ran for New York attorney general in 2018. In the years since, she has sued Trump repeatedly, sparking controversy and winning major victories in court. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption toggle caption Seth Wenig/AP Letitia James promised to “take on” then-President Donald Trump when she ran for New York attorney general in 2018. In the years since, she has sued Trump repeatedly, sparking controversy and winning major victories in court. Seth Wenig/AP When state Judge Arthur Engoron ordered former President Donald Trump and his companies to pay over $355 million for widespread fraud on Friday, it was another stunning victory for New York Attorney General Letitia James. “Donald Trump may have authored The Art of the Deal, but he perfected the art of the steal,” James said at a news conference after the ruling was issued. She then took a shot at Trump’s character: “The scale and the scope of Donald Trump’s fraud is staggering and so too is his ego and his belief …

Gun Victims’ AI-Generated Voices Are Used in Messages Sent to Lawmakers Who Support the NRA

Gun Victims’ AI-Generated Voices Are Used in Messages Sent to Lawmakers Who Support the NRA

[ad_1] PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — Joaquin “Guac” Oliver died in the 2018 Parkland, Florida, high school massacre, but federal lawmakers who oppose tighter gun regulations began getting phone calls in his voice on Wednesday, lambasting them for their position. The families of Oliver and five others killed with guns are using artificial intelligence to create messages in their loved ones’ voices and robocalling them to senators and House members who support the National Rifle Association and oppose tougher gun laws. The protest is being run through The Shotline website, where visitors select which offices receive calls. Manuel and Patricia Oliver, Joaquin’s parents, say the campaign is based on the oft-cited idea that if someone wants laws changed, the first step is calling elected representatives. Immigrants from Venezuela who became U.S. citizens, they want the sale of guns like the AR-15 banned. “We come from a place where gun violence is a problem, but you will never see a 19-year-old with an AR-15 getting into a school and shooting people,” Manuel Oliver said. “There’s a reason …

“We didn’t yield”: Trump brags to NRA about lax gun control during his time in office

“We didn’t yield”: Trump brags to NRA about lax gun control during his time in office

[ad_1] In 2019, a year in which Donald Trump served as president, the U.S. suffered more mass killings than any other year on record — according to a database compiled by the Associated Press, USA Today and Northeastern University — but in a speech delivered at the National Rifle Association presidential forum on Friday night, the 2024 Republican frontrunner brags about not yielding to pressure in terms of tightening up on gun restrictions. In his remarks given to a crowd of fellow gun enthusiasts at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex, Trump praised himself for championing a right to self-defense — seemingly at any cost — saying, “You’ve always had that right, and during my four years, nothing happened, and there was great pressure on me having to do with guns. We did nothing. We didn’t yield. And once you yield a little bit, that’s just the beginning. That’s when the avalanche begins.” Referencing President Biden as ushering in “four more years of anti-gun communists” should he be re-elected at the end of this year, he furthered that, “They’re gonna run it . . …

Wayne LaPierre Finally Takes the Fall. Will the NRA Survive Without Him?

Wayne LaPierre Finally Takes the Fall. Will the NRA Survive Without Him?

[ad_1] Host Brian Stelter talks with Will Van Sant, a staff writer for The Trace, a nonpartisan newsroom covering guns, about whether the National Rifle Association can recover after the blockbuster NRA corruption trial and the resignation of CEO Wayne LaPierre.  The New York attorney general’s civil fraud case against the NRA alleges that the group’s top officials used the nonprofit’s charitable assets to provide for themselves. Since LaPierre’s exit from the organization, according to Van Sant, the NRA has attempted to distance itself from its former leader, characterizing itself as a victim of his siphoning—their argument, in part, that he perverted the organization. (LaPierre has denied the allegations against him.) In addition to the damning evidence against LaPierre, Van Sant and Stelter discuss who LaPierre is, as an alleged grifter and stoker of culture wars, and if the NRA and LaPierre’s downfall ultimately even matter at this point when it comes to gun control measures. LaPierre first joined the NRA as a lobbyist and became its longtime leader of more than 30 years, overseeing …

Expert: Wayne LaPierre leaves financial mess at NRA — beyond the one that landed them in court

Expert: Wayne LaPierre leaves financial mess at NRA — beyond the one that landed them in court

[ad_1] Wayne LaPierre, the National Rifle Association’s longtime leader, plans to retire by the end of January 2024. He cited “health reasons” when he announced his departure three days before the organization’s civil fraud trial got underway in Manhattan. New York authorities have accused the NRA, LaPierre and three of his current or former colleagues of squandering millions of dollars the gun group had obtained from its members. As a nonprofit accounting scholar who has followed the NRA’s finances for years, I believe the organization is not only at a legal crossroads but also at a financial one. NRA business model To see why the NRA finds itself in this difficult spot, it helps to first see how its business model allows for only a small margin of error. Despite the nonprofit’s long history– it was founded in 1871 by Civil War veterans who fought for the Union – the NRA has never had enough money stowed away to inoculate it from financial problems. Consider the NRA’s circumstances in terms of its unrestricted net assets, …

The NRA Under Siege – The Atlantic

The NRA Under Siege – The Atlantic

[ad_1] When Wayne LaPierre, the longtime leader of the National Rifle Association, announced his resignation on Friday, his opponents may have been tempted to celebrate. But the reality is that his departure does not necessarily change the group’s immediate prospects. The NRA remains under the control of an old guard that comprises mainly LaPierre’s lieutenants. If change is to come quickly to the NRA, it will be through the trial that began in New York today. The civil suit from New York Attorney General Letitia James alleges misappropriation of funds on a grand scale by the group’s leadership. If the jury finds in her favor, then the judge may order what she’s petitioning for—that the NRA find new leaders, the old ones pay restitution to its members, and the group answer to a court-appointed overseer. At least in the near term, only that outcome could empower the reformers within the organization. James initially sought the complete dissolution of the NRA, as a punishment for the alleged impropriety by its leaders. Justice Joel Cohen of the …

Wayne LaPierre: the man who remade the NRA as the ‘good guy with a gun’ | NRA

Wayne LaPierre: the man who remade the NRA as the ‘good guy with a gun’ | NRA

[ad_1] For three decades, Wayne LaPierre has been the face of gun rights in the US. Lean and bespectacled, known for his expensive suits, he was an unlikely spokesperson for American machismo. But the National Rifle Association leader’s willingness to defend Americans’ access to guns, no matter the cost, made him a powerful rightwing figure, whose relentless, paranoid rhetoric made him an important precursor, and then ally, of Donald Trump. Today, LaPierre is facing a reckoning: he is expected to testify in a civil corruption case in Manhattan that will scrutinize allegations that he and other senior executives misused NRA donors’ funds, squandering millions of dollars on lavish personal trips and expenses, and treating the NRA as his own “personal piggy bank”. On Friday, just days before the trial is expected to begin, the NRA announced LaPierre, 74, would be stepping down as its chief executive, after leading the group since 1991.The NRA said LaPierre “cited health reasons as a reason for his decision”, and announced that Andrew Arulanandam, LaPierre’s longtime spokesperson, would be taking …

NRA chief, one of the most powerful figures in US gun policy, says he’s resigning days before trial

NRA chief, one of the most powerful figures in US gun policy, says he’s resigning days before trial

[ad_1] NEW YORK: The longtime head of the National Rifle Association said Friday (Jan 5) he is resigning, just days before the start of a civil trial over allegations he diverted millions of dollars from the powerful gun rights organization to pay for personal travel, security and other perks. Wayne LaPierre, the executive vice president and chief executive officer, said his departure is effective Jan 31. The trial in New York Attorney General Letitia James’ lawsuit against him, the NRA and others who have served as organization executives is scheduled to start on Monday. LaPierre and ex-NRA President Oliver North are among the witnesses expected to testify. LaPierre, 74, has led the NRA’s day-to-day operations since 1991, acting as the face and vehement voice of its gun rights agenda. He once warned of “jack-booted government thugs” seizing guns, called for armed guards in every school after a spate of shootings, and condemned foes backing gun control measures as “opportunists” who “exploit tragedy for gain”. In recent years though, the NRA has been beset by dwindling …