All posts tagged: New York Times

Report: Revamped Siri to Be at the Core of Apple’s New AI Strategy

Report: Revamped Siri to Be at the Core of Apple’s New AI Strategy

[ad_1] Apple’s shift to develop its own AI technology to keep up with competitors was today detailed in a The New York Times report. Citing sources familiar with Apple’s work, the report explains that the decision to revamp Siri was taken early last year by Apple’s most senior executives. Senior vice president of software engineering Craig Federighi and senior vice president of Machine Learning and AI Strategy John Giannandrea are said to have spent several weeks testing OpenAI’s ChatGPT to understand the ways in which the competitor made ‌Siri‌ look antiquated. The ‌Siri‌ team purportedly failed to receive attention and resources compared to other groups inside Apple, and the company has struggled to recruit and retain leading AI researchers. Apple executives are said to be concerned that AI threatens the iPhone’s market share because it has the potential to become a more compelling operating system with an ecosystem of AI apps that undermine the App Store. Apple apparently fears the ‌iPhone‌ becoming a “dumb brick” compared with other technology. This conclusion triggered a significant reorganization …

Dow Jones, NYT, Dotdash Meredith and Informa confound news biz doomsters

Dow Jones, NYT, Dotdash Meredith and Informa confound news biz doomsters

[ad_1] News Corp’s New York headquarters. Picture: Dominic Ponsford Headlines like this in the FT – “Is AI about to kill what’s left of journalism?” – contribute to an atmosphere of gloom around the prospects for the news industry. But this week there were multiple signs that parts of the news business, at least, have grounds for optimism. This is reflected by stock market investors returning to media shares after a two-year slump — although it is too early to say whether this is just a brief rebound. Here’s a round-up of positive sentiments around news media this week that contradict the doomsters and gloomsters. News Corp’s Dow Jones has just topped 5m digital subscribers News Corp’s third-quarter results reveal strong subscriber growth contributing to revenues in its business information division Dow Jones up $15m in the period to $544m. Thanks for subscribing. Close Digital subscriptions to the Wall Street Journal grew 13% to 3,715,000 and investment news service Barron’s grew digital subscriptions by 26% to 1,221,000. Content from our partners Digital advertising growth of …

How New York Times plans to cover Trump’s presidential campaign

How New York Times plans to cover Trump’s presidential campaign

[ad_1] New York Times executive editor Joseph Kahn at the INMA World Congress in London on 24 April 2024. Picture: Robert Downs/INMA New York Times executive editor Joseph Kahn has said covering Donald Trump is a challenge that requires a balance between sharing his statements, even when they are false, and contextualising but not censoring them. Speaking at the INMA World Congress of News Media in London on Wednesday, Kahn said covering Trump is a “particular challenge” and it takes a “certain skill” to write about him. “Our view is that when you have a candidate who does frequently indulge in conspiracy theories or depart from the facts and can hold an audience captive with long kind of soliloquies that actually don’t contain real information in them, we have to do more than just provide a platform for that,” Kahn, who took on the top editorial job at The New York Times in June 2022 and was managing editor during Trump’s presidency, said. “On the other hand, we do need to cover what he’s saying. …

Does my alma mater deserve an F in antisemitism?

Does my alma mater deserve an F in antisemitism?

[ad_1] (RNS) — Steely Dan put it this way, singing about nostalgia for Bard College: “I’m never going back to my old school.” Bard College is about an hour and a half north of “my old school,” SUNY Purchase. Unlike Walter and Donald, I do go back to my old school — physically, when I can, and in my memories. I went back to my old school recently as I read the Anti-Defamation League’s report card on antisemitism on college campuses and how those colleges were dealing with that issue. They gave SUNY Purchase an F. Here is the report from the ADL: State University of New York at Purchase has 750 Jewish undergraduate students, who comprise about 24% of the undergraduate student population. There are 10 Jewish graduate students representing 13% of the small graduate population. Hillels of Westchester, a collaborative unit of Hillel chapters across the county, supports the campus. There have been recent incidents on campus. A student was suspended in December for entering an administrator’s office and tearing down a “We …

Russia’s tragedy, Putin’s humiliation – The Atlantic

Russia’s tragedy, Putin’s humiliation – The Atlantic

[ad_1] This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. Terrorists struck deep inside Russia on Friday, and the conspiracy theories are already spinning. First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: Three Realities If you are trying to figure out who attacked a Russian rock concert and why they slaughtered and wounded dozens of people, your confusion is understandable. In an era when social media spews chaff and deception during every crisis, some fairly straightforward issues get obscured in all the drama. As we untangle the ghastly attack just outside of Moscow, bear in mind three realities about politics in Russia. First, some terrorist groups have a long-standing hatred of the Russians, and mass-casualty attacks in Russia’s cities are not new. Americans, scarred by 9/11, often think that they are the prime target of Islamist extremists, but over the past two decades, Russia has endured more …

Why Trump Won’t Stop Suing the Media and Losing

Why Trump Won’t Stop Suing the Media and Losing

[ad_1] Why would the most notoriously cash-strapped man in America waste money on frivolous lawsuits? On Monday, Donald Trump—whose lawyers recently announced that he can’t come up with the money to post a $454 million bond in his civil fraud case—fired off yet another suit against a news organization that reported facts he didn’t like. The targets this time are ABC News and its anchor George Stephanopoulos, who Trump alleges defamed him by stating that Trump had been found liable for raping E. Jean Carroll. The case looks like a sure loser. Trump was technically found liable under New York law for sexual abuse, not for rape, but the judge in the civil case ruled that, by forcibly penetrating Carroll’s vagina with his fingers, “Mr. Trump in fact did ‘rape’ Ms. Carroll as that term commonly is used and understood.” But no matter. The Stephanopoulos suit slots into a well-worn groove for Trump, who for years has lodged periodic lawsuits against alleged purveyors of “fake news” about him. Targets have included The Washington Post, The …

The wrong way to study AI in college

The wrong way to study AI in college

[ad_1] Computer-science students are being shielded from the liberal arts. That may be a problem. Illustration by The Atlantic. Source: Max Whittaker / The New York Times / Redux March 22, 2024, 1:17 PM ET This is Atlantic Intelligence, a limited-run series in which our writers help you wrap your mind around artificial intelligence and a new machine age. Sign up here. Earlier this week, my colleague Ian Bogost published a provocative article about a trend in higher education: the opening of distinct colleges of computing, akin to law schools. New programs at MIT, Cornell, and soon UC Berkeley follow an uptick in the number of students graduating with computer-science majors. They are serving a growing market. “When they elevate computing to the status of a college, with departments and a budget, they are declaring it a higher-order domain of knowledge and practice,” Ian writes. “That decision will inform a fundamental question: whether computing ought to be seen as a superfield that lords over all others, or just a servant of other domains, subordinated to …

When the Experts Failed During COVID-19

When the Experts Failed During COVID-19

[ad_1] Experts hate to be wrong. When I first started writing about the public’s hostility toward expertise and established knowledge more than a decade ago, I predicted that any number of crises—including a pandemic—might be the moment that snaps the public back to its senses. I was wrong. I didn’t foresee how some citizens and their leaders would respond to the cycle of advances and setbacks in the scientific process and to the inevitable limitations of human experts. The coronavirus pandemic, in particular, would prove the perfect crucible for accelerating the decline of faith in experts. Paranoia and appeals to ignorance have long been part of the American political environment, but they were especially destructive at a time when the U.S. was riven by partisan hostility. The pandemic struck at multiple political and cultural weaknesses within the edifice of American life: A mysterious disease—from China, no less, a nation that typically serves as a source of American anxiety—forced citizens to rely on the media, including outlets that many of them already distrusted, for scattered pieces …

The British Right’s Favorite Sex Offender

The British Right’s Favorite Sex Offender

[ad_1] In October 2017, a week after The New York Times published testimony from eight women accusing the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sex offenses, one of Weinstein’s old friends published an article defending him. “I smell a rat when it comes to Harvey Weinstein,” the writer Panagiotis “Taki” Theodoracopulos declared in the British magazine The Spectator. “Harvey’s a committed lefty, Hillary’s pal, and he thinks that the Germans were all bad 70 years ago (he’s totally and catastrophically wrong on all counts). But I really like him.” The column was classic Taki: provocative, arrogant, and self-incriminatory. (The writer, who is universally known by his nickname, was once described by The Spectator’s former owner as having views “almost worthy of Goebbels.”) “In Harvey’s case, there is a lot to hang him with, and now that it’s out in the open, they are all creeping out of the woodwork,” he wrote. “Even an ugly waitress has suddenly recalled that she served the ‘pig’ while he hit on women.” Read: ‘Alleged’ no longer Reading these words, the …