All posts tagged: Neanderthal

The reconstruction of a 75,000-year-old Neanderthal woman’s face makes her look quite friendly – there’s a problem with that

The reconstruction of a 75,000-year-old Neanderthal woman’s face makes her look quite friendly – there’s a problem with that

[ad_1] From a flaky skull, found “as flat as a pizza” on a cave floor in northern Iraq, the face of a 75,000-year-old Neanderthal woman named “Shanidar Z” has been reconstructed. With her calm and considered expression, Shanidar Z looks like a thoughtful, approachable, even kindly middle-aged woman. She is a far cry from the snarling, animalistic stereotype of the Neanderthal first created in 1908 after the discovery of the “old man of La Chapelle”. On the basis of the old man and the first relatively complete skeleton of its kind to be found, scientists made a series of presumptions about Neanderthal character. They believed Neanderthals to have a low, receding forehead, protruding midface and heavy brow representing a baseness and stupidity found among “lower races”. These presumptions were influenced by prevailing ideas about the scientific measurement of skulls and racial hierarchy – ideas now debunked as racist. This reconstruction set the scene for understanding Neanderthals for decades, and indicated how far modern humans had come. By contrast, this newest facial reconstruction, based on research …

Astonishing images show how female Neanderthal may have looked

Astonishing images show how female Neanderthal may have looked

[ad_1] A reconstruction of what Shanidar Z might have looked like, by Dutch twins Adrie and Alfons Kennis BBC Studios/Jamie Simonds MEET Shanidar Z, one of the most important Neanderthal discoveries in a generation. Her remains, thought to date back 75,000 years, were fully unearthed five years ago in a re-excavation of a legendary archaeological site, Shanidar cave, in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. She appears to have been deliberately interred along with a cluster of nine other Neanderthal men, women and children, whose skeletons were uncovered from the 1950s onwards and transformed our… [ad_2] Source link

Face of 75,000-year-old Neanderthal woman reconstructed | Science & Tech News

Face of 75,000-year-old Neanderthal woman reconstructed | Science & Tech News

[ad_1] Archaeologists have been able to piece together the skull of a 75,000-year-old Neanderthal skeleton. Researchers from Cambridge University and Liverpool John Moores unearthed the skull at the Shanidar Cave site, 500 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq. As part of a new Netflix documentary, Secrets of The Neanderthals, they were able to put the skull back together and recreate the face of the woman it once belonged to. The skull was first found in 2018, where it had been flattened to around two centimetres thick. It had been crushed, possibly by rockfall, soon after death and compacted further by tens of thousands of years of sediment. Archaeologists named the skeleton Shanidar Z. Image: The skull was remade from over 200 bone fragments. Pic: PA ‘High stakes 3D jigsaw puzzle’ To recreate the skull they had to piece together, by hand, more than 200 fragments of bone. Using sequencing on tooth enamel proteins they were able to determine the skeleton was likely a female. Her teeth were also used to gauge her age, thought to be …

Genomes of modern Indian people include wide range of Neanderthal DNA

Genomes of modern Indian people include wide range of Neanderthal DNA

[ad_1] People in India have a wide range of Neanderthal DNA in their genomes Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto via Getty Images The largest ever genome study of South Asian people has discovered a wide range of Neanderthal DNA sequences in modern Indian people. The findings raise the possibility of building a full Neanderthal genome from living humans, instead of relying on DNA from ancient remains. All modern humans except African people retain an average of around 1 to 2 per cent of their genetic ancestry from archaic hominins, including Neanderthals and Denisovans. African people also get about 0.5… [ad_2] Source link

Ancient Neanderthal gene make humans more sensitive to pain, study finds

Ancient Neanderthal gene make humans more sensitive to pain, study finds

[ad_1] Scientists have unveiled how three Neanderthal gene variants play a pivotal role in making some individuals more sensitive to pain.(CREDIT: Creative Commons) In a groundbreaking study co-led by researchers from University College London (UCL), scientists have unveiled how three Neanderthal gene variants play a pivotal role in making some individuals more sensitive to certain types of pain. These findings, published in Communications Biology, offer fresh insights into the enduring impact of Neanderthal interbreeding on the genetic makeup of modern humans. The focus of this study was on the SCN9A gene, which is associated with sensory neurons responsible for detecting signals from damaged tissue. Specifically, the research honed in on three Neanderthal variants within SCN9A: M932L, V991L, and D1908G. Prior to this investigation, while it was known that humans carrying all three variants exhibited heightened pain sensitivity, the specific sensory responses influenced by these variants remained a mystery. The SCN9A gene codes for a sodium channel that is primarily expressed in sensory neurons, enabling the detection of signals stemming from damaged tissue. Within the Colombian …