All posts tagged: Nazi Loot Restitution

Sotheby’s Ordered to Reveal Consignor and Buyer of Tiepolo Painting

Sotheby’s Ordered to Reveal Consignor and Buyer of Tiepolo Painting

A New York State Supreme Court judge ruled that Sotheby’s must reveal both the consigner and the buyer of a Giovanni Battista Tiepolo painting purchased in 2019 that may become subject to a restitution claim, according to the New York Times. Three heirs of a Jewish art dealer named Otto Fröhlich say the painting, St. Francis of Paola Holding a Rosary, Book, and Staff, was lost during the Holocaust when Fröhlich fled Austria to escape the Nazis in 1938. The heirs need the names of the buyer and the seller to pursue the claim, according to the suit.  Related Articles Experts told the Times that while courts have in the past directed an auction house to reveal one of the two parties involved in a sale, it’s rare for both names to be revealed. “This case certainly establishes clear precedent that where heirs provide support for their claims of restitution, auction houses will be required to disclose the names and contact information of the buyers and sellers of the claimed looted art and cannot hide behind confidentiality policies to …

Mysterious Kirchner Painting Discovered—and More Art News

Mysterious Kirchner Painting Discovered—and More Art News

To receive Morning Links in your inbox every weekday, sign up for our Breakfast with ARTnews newsletter. THE HEADLINES BURDEN OF PROOF LIFTED. Nations agreed to new clarifications outlining “best practices” for adhering to the non-binding Washington Principles on Nazi-Confiscated Art, when it comes to sticky questions that continue to stump restitution claims and feed ongoing court battles. In the new, “best practices” text signed thus far by 22 nations, guidelines specify that promoting “just and fair” solutions to restitution requests refers to the wellbeing “first and foremost of the victims” of Nazi persecution – not, as leaders in the Netherlands thought, to the current holder of the contested art. The guidelines also help define Nazi-looted art. Notably, in the case of determining if an object was sold under duress, it specifies that art sold “by a persecuted person during the Holocaust era between 1933-1945 can be considered equivalent to an involuntary transfer of property based on the circumstances of the sale.” As a result, “now it’s up to the current holder to prove the exemption from this general rule,” …