All posts tagged: naturalism

Doesn’t Methodological Naturalism Refute Itself?

Doesn’t Methodological Naturalism Refute Itself?

News <!– –> March 22, 2024 1 Philosophy Listen to the new podcast episode discussing this question News <!– –> March 22, 2024 1 Philosophy Get caught up with the Mind Matters podcast by listening to this special episode featuring hosts Angus Menuge and Robert J. Marks and their guest, Dr. Robert Larmer. Dr. Larmer wrote a fascinating chapter in last year’s groundbreaking book Minding the Brain, and sat down with Mind Matters to discuss the limits of “methodological naturalism.” For Larmer, this approach to getting knowledge is limited because it rules out non-physical causes, even if they exist. In addition, holding to naturalism at all costs can undermine our self-understanding as rational agents. How can we trust our brains? Does the physical activity in our brains correlate with non-physical mental states? Find out more by listening to Part One of the conversation here. Be sure to peruse the exciting list of podcast episodes to stay up to date on more great conversations about mind, matter, and the big questions. !function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s) {if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function(){n.callMethod? n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments)}; if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0′; n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0; …

Spirituality, naturalism, and alternative health practices serve as gateways to anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, study suggests

Spirituality, naturalism, and alternative health practices serve as gateways to anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, study suggests

A recent study led by researchers from the University of Tokyo has shed light on the intricate web of factors contributing to vaccine hesitancy and resistance. The study, published in the Journal of Computational Social Science, identifies online political engagement, conspiracy theories, and spirituality as significant influences shaping anti-vaccine beliefs across different societal groups. The findings are based on an extensive analysis of nearly 100,000,000 posts on the social media platform Twitter (now known as X). To conduct their study, Professor Fujio Toriumi from the Department of Systems Innovation and his colleagues first set about identifying Twitter accounts that actively spread anti-vaccine information. This identification process was based on the content of tweets related to vaccines, specifically looking for narratives that were either critical of vaccines or outright opposed to their use. The team employed the Twitter Public API to gather tweets containing references to vaccines, yielding a substantial dataset spanning the entirety of 2021. This initial collection phase resulted in 98,805,971 tweets, from which the researchers then extracted relevant data for their analysis. Following …