All posts tagged: native

As US spotlights those missing or dead in Native communities, prosecutors work to solve their cases

As US spotlights those missing or dead in Native communities, prosecutors work to solve their cases

Albuquerque, New Mexico —  It was a frigid winter morning when authorities found a Native American man dead on a remote gravel road in western New Mexico. He was lying on his side, with only one sock on, his clothes gone and his shoes tossed in the snow. There were trails of blood on both sides of his body and it appeared he had been struck in the head. Investigators retraced the man’s steps, gathering security camera footage that showed him walking near a convenience store miles away in Gallup, an economic hub in an otherwise rural area bordered on one side by the Navajo Nation and Zuni Pueblo on the other. Court records said the footage and cell phone records showed the victim — a Navajo man identified only as John Doe — was “on a collision course” with the man who would ultimately be accused of killing him. A grand jury has indicted a man from Zuni Pueblo on a charge of second-degree murder in the Jan. 18 death, and prosecutors say more …

Faux Native American costumes and clothing reconsidered – in pictures | Art and design

Faux Native American costumes and clothing reconsidered – in pictures | Art and design

Artist Selena Kearney was raised on the Chehalis reservation in Washington state and began photographing fake native regalia after a chance encounter with a young woman in a grocery store on Halloween. “She was wearing a skimpy faux-Native American costume,” she says. “I couldn’t begin to understand how that cheap outfit had anything to do with me, or my heritage.” Curious about the power of these objects, she started to collect and consider them, sourcing sports paraphernalia, traditional headdresses and vintage and new costumes from eBay and Amazon. Over the course of five years, Kearney photographed them and the resulting series is now featured in a book, Every Object Has a Ritual (published by Minor Matters), and an exhibition at the Suquamish Museum in Washington state (Object/Ritual, 18 May-January 2025). “Collecting masks felt the hardest of all,” she says. One featuring a woman with two braids was particularly unsettling. “A parody of me, looking back at me.” Source link

Alaska has a plan to save its salmon but some Native leaders are wary | Alaska

Alaska has a plan to save its salmon but some Native leaders are wary | Alaska

Earlier this month Alaska officials announced a new plan they say could revive the Yukon River’s struggling salmon population. The 2,000-mile waterway that runs from Canada’s Yukon Territory to the Bering Sea has seen sharp declines in its Chinook, or king salmon, in recent years. The new strategy aims to restore the number of fish that reach their northern spawning areas near the Canadian border to 71,000, up from about 15,000 that reached the Canadian border in 2023, by suspending commercial, sport, domestic and personal use fisheries in the Yukon River until 2030. Previously, fishing closures were revisited each year. But some tribal leaders say the closures unfairly burden Native communities, severing a crucial link to traditional culture, and that officials did not properly consult them while forming the plan. “I understand the intent of the agreement was to protect salmon, but this is not the solution,” said Brooke Woods, former executive chair for the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission and a climate adaptation specialist at Woodwell Climate Research Center. The fish face a cluster …

Alaska’s Indigenous Teens Emulate Ancestors’ Arctic Survival Skills at the Native Youth Olympics

Alaska’s Indigenous Teens Emulate Ancestors’ Arctic Survival Skills at the Native Youth Olympics

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The athletes filling a huge gym in Anchorage were ready to compete, cheering and stomping and high-fiving each other as they lined up for the chance to claim the state’s top prize in their events. But these teenagers were at the Native Youth Olympics, a statewide competition that attracts hundreds of Alaska Native athletes each year and pays tribute to the skills and techniques used by their ancestors to survive in the harsh polar climate. Events at the competition that wraps up Saturday include a stick pull, meant to mimic holding onto a slippery seal as it fights to return to the water, and a modified, four-step broad jump that approximates leaping across ice floes on the frozen ocean. For generations, Alaska Natives played these games to develop the skills they needed to become successful hunters — and survive — in an unforgiving climate. Now, today’s youth play “to help preserve our culture, our heritage, and to teach our youth how difficult life used to be and to share our culture …

“Explain To Me Why We Don’t Have The Right To Exist?” – Eva Vlaardingerbroek Warns Whites Against Massive Demographic Changes In Their Native Countries

“Explain To Me Why We Don’t Have The Right To Exist?” – Eva Vlaardingerbroek Warns Whites Against Massive Demographic Changes In Their Native Countries

By John Cody of RMXNews.com In an exclusive interview with Remix News, Dutch political commentator and lawyer Eva Vlaardingerbroek warns Europeans that they must take a stand against rapid demographic change or become a minority in their native countries. You’ve spoken a lot about White rights and the White replacement. But of course this kind of opens you up to these accusations of racism. So, how do conservatives deal with this Catch-22 of not wanting to be replaced in their native countries, but also not wanting to be attacked with this term? You can’t. That’s the thing, you can’t. So you have to pick a side. Of course, you’re going to be attacked if you say, “Hey, this continent, Europe, has been predominantly White for the entirety of its history, and now suddenly within one generation, a few bureaucrats have decided against the will of the people that we should suddenly be a minority. Why do we agree with that, or why do we allow that to happen?” If you say that, you are going …

The DAM Rejects Return Request from Native Alaskan Tribes

The DAM Rejects Return Request from Native Alaskan Tribes

The 146,000-square-foot Hamilton Building. Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.   The DAM (Denver Art Museum) rejected return requests from two federally-recognized Native Alaskan Tribes. The institution went on with this action, despite multiple delegation trips and the filing of three formal claims. A article published in the Denver Post earlier this month revealed the various challenges for Indigenous and Native tribes to reclaim funerary goods.   It Would Stop at Nothing to Prevent the Return? (Photo by RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images) DENVER POST VIA GETTY IMAGES   There are also ancestors’ remains, retained by museums and esteemed institutions in the United States, even after the passing of NAGPRA. “They have control of these objects, and they can make it as easy or difficult as they want”, Denver Post investigative reporter Sam Tachnik told Alaska Public Media on April 22.   Twelve tribe members from Alaska’s Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes convened with museum representatives in 2017 over a wooden house partition depicting a raven. It was 14 feet wide, and taught the …

Denver Art Museum Denies Repatriation Requests from Native Alaskan Tribes: Report

Denver Art Museum Denies Repatriation Requests from Native Alaskan Tribes: Report

The Denver Art Museum (DAM) has denied repatriation requests from two federally-recognized Native Alaskan Tribes despite the submission of three formal claims and numerous delegation visits. A report in the Denver Post earlier this month detailed the different barriers for Indigenous and Native groups to recover funerary objects and ancestral remains held by museums and prestigious universities in the US, even after the passing of NAGPRA. “They have control of these objects, and they can make it as easy or difficult as they want”, Denver Post investigative reporter Sam Tachnik told Alaska Public Media on April 22. Related Articles In 2017, a dozen tribal members from the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska met with museum officials over a 14-foot-wide wooden house partition of a raven showing how the community how to fish. The delegation said the 170-year-old painted panels should be returned under a federal law passed in 1990. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, known as NAGPRA, established processes and procedures for museums and other institutions to return human remains, funerary objects and …

Native Microsoft OneNote App Now Available for Apple Vision Pro

Native Microsoft OneNote App Now Available for Apple Vision Pro

Microsoft today introduced a version of OneNote that is designed to run on the Apple Vision Pro headset. OneNote for Vision Pro was created for visionOS, and it includes many of the features that are available on OneNote for iPad. The app can be used to write memos, notes, and digital notebooks, and there are options to sync content to OneDrive for access across multiple platforms. There is support for tags like Important and To Do, and notes can be protected with a password. OneNote on Vision Pro works hands-free or with a connected keyboard and mouse. In the future, Microsoft plans to add support for Copilot, two-factor authentication, and inserting images from the camera or the Photos app. OneNote can be downloaded from the ‌visionOS‌ App Store as of today. It works with personal and work accounts that are not managed by an organization. Microsoft has made many of its apps available on the Vision Pro, including Teams, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. Popular Stories iOS 18 Will Add These New Features to Your …

How to volunteer with native plants in L.A., Santa Barbara, OC

How to volunteer with native plants in L.A., Santa Barbara, OC

One of the easiest ways to learn about California native plants is volunteering to get your hands dirty. There are numerous nonprofit organizations devoted to protecting and/or restoring habitat in Southern California’s fire– or invasive-weed–ravaged hills, and they rely on volunteers to help them with a variety of chores, from seeding and potting to planting native seedlings in the field. Basically, if an organization refers to a habitat restoration project, chances are excellent the work involves native plants — collecting native seeds, transplanting seedlings, planting those seedlings in the wild and removing invasive weeds that threaten them. Habitat restoration is labor-intensive, time-consuming work, but it’s also a great way to get hands-on lessons from the botanists who spend their days trying to shore up our indigenous animals by rebuilding what’s been lost to wildfire, development and fast-growing non-native plants like black mustard. Those jobs are also a way to scratch an itch to work with plants, even if you don’t have a traditional yard. Barbara Chung, for instance, has only a tiny 7-by-12-foot patio at …

Meet muscadines, the native grapes of the southern U.S.

Meet muscadines, the native grapes of the southern U.S.

When I lived in Atlanta, purple and golden orbs would start to appear just after the heat reached its peak in August, lining the path on the long walks I took from my apartment to the park I frequented. Tucked into crevices among the green leaves, the fruit would announce itself first with its shining, flawless skin, then with a faint scent of sweetness, which signaled that a reprieve from the heat was soon to follow. After freeing the pulp from its skin and seeds, I would casually pop the fruit into my mouth and be momentarily overwhelmed by the flavor of those last long days of Southern summer. When I’d first moved to Georgia, as a kid, my neighbor had explained to me that these ubiquitous berries were muscadines, or Vitis rotundifolia, a variety of grape that looks — and tastes — nothing like the green seedless grapes I was used to finding in my lunchbox. Unlike table grapes, which tend to be oblong, muscadines are round, with particularly shiny flesh. The flavor is fuller, more complex than that …