All posts tagged: making

Tell us: are you making a change to your summer holidays? | Travel

Tell us: are you making a change to your summer holidays? | Travel

[ad_1] As the northern hemisphere enters the summer, we want to hear from people who are planning to have a different type of summer holiday this year. Are you visiting a cooler climate than usual? Or holidaying domestically when you go abroad most summers, or vice versa? Whether it’s due to climate conditions, finances or another factor, if you’re doing things differently this year, tell us where you’re going and why. What was the trigger? Is this the first time you’re doing this? We’d also like to hear from those working in the tourism industry – have you observed any new trends, including a shift in the destinations people are travelling to? Share your experience We would like to hear from those who are making a change to their summer holiday, including travelling to a cooler climate. Your responses, which can be anonymous, are secure as the form is encrypted and only the Guardian has access to your contributions. We will only use the data you provide us for the purpose of the feature and …

‘Anything can be edible’: how Italians are making a meal of invasive crabs | Seafood

‘Anything can be edible’: how Italians are making a meal of invasive crabs | Seafood

[ad_1] In a down-to-earth suburb of Catania on Sicily’s east coast, smoke billows from street stands selling traditional grilled horse meat, and local youngsters gather around kiosks selling the region’s unique handmade drink, seltz limone e sale (seltzer with lemon and sea salt). It is here that a family of charismatic ex-fishers have opened a seafood restaurant that bravely challenges long-held regional conventions. The Salamone family sell all the usual local specialities in their slick new business “La Fish”, such as Sicily’s famous swordfish, sardines and tuna. However, the feature of tonight’s tasting menu – attracting customers who range from local families to food connoisseurs – is a relative newcomer to these shores and to Sicilian tables: the Atlantic blue crab. Tommaso Salamone, left, says he opened his family’s fish shop and restaurant, La Fish, in Catania, to show blue crabs in a new light. Photograph: Kate Stanworth Inside the restaurant, about half a dozen blue crabs are displayed on a large fish counter alongside an array of other seafood. These crabs, with their striking …

Simon Armitage: Poets can fight climate crisis by making us spellbound by nature | Simon Armitage

Simon Armitage: Poets can fight climate crisis by making us spellbound by nature | Simon Armitage

[ad_1] Poets can help fight climate breakdown by making us “spellbound, full of wonder and beguiled” by nature, the poet laureate has said. Simon Armitage, who pledged to dedicate his writing and thinking to environmental issues when he was appointed poet laureate in 2019, has written a new book of poems called Blossomise, which he hopes will remind readers of the beauty of nature. Asked at the Hay festival in Powys about the role of poets in communicating the threat of climate breakdown, he said: “We do what we can. My feeling about this book is it’s slightly different from my other work in that there’s a lot of praise and wonder in it. “I think if we are spellbound and full of wonder and beguiled by nature we’re just less likely to want to destroy it, we’ll carry on wanting to preserve it. That’s my approach. “I wanted to celebrate and to recognise blossom as an incredibly joyful thing but I also wanted to write about the way the weather is upside down and …

Scientists develop method of making healthier, more sustainable chocolate | Food

Scientists develop method of making healthier, more sustainable chocolate | Food

[ad_1] Healthier and more sustainable chocolate could hit store shelves after Swiss scientists and chocolatiers developed a recipe that swaps sugar for waste plant matter. By mashing up the pulp and husk of a cocoa pod instead of just taking the beans, scientists have made a sweet and fibrous gel that could replace the sugar in chocolate, according to a report published in Nature Food. This “whole food” approach makes a more nutritious product than conventional chocolate and uses less land and water, the scientists found – while still satisfying a sweet tooth. “The cocoa fruit is basically a pumpkin and right now we’re just using the seeds,” said Kim Mishra, a food technologist at ETH Zürich and lead author of the study. “But there’s a lot of other marvellous stuff in that fruit.” The researchers used the waste flesh and juice of the cocoa fruit to make a gel that can be added to chocolate instead of powdered crystalline sugar that is traditionally used. Usually, “introducing moisture into chocolate is a complete no-go because …

Inadequate bird flu testing is making pandemic experts concerned we’re “flying blind” with H5N1

Inadequate bird flu testing is making pandemic experts concerned we’re “flying blind” with H5N1

[ad_1] After public health officials confirmed H5N1, the virus also known as bird flu, jumped from poultry to cows and recently infected an American, they’ve warned that if the virus strain made its way to pigs, it could be a time to press the panic button. That’s because swine are closer to humans in genetic terms, acting as a prime reservoir for viruses to mutate into something that could turn into a far-reaching pandemic in people. But now, a new study suggests that dairy cows might have the same potential as pigs, which could improve the bird flu’s capability of being more human-to-human transmission.  As reported by Nature, preliminary data shows that the flu virus can jump back and forth between cows and birds thanks to a specific receptor. This specific trait might allow the virus to spread more widely and develop more mutations along the way. If a single cow can be a host to multiple types of influenza over time, it could evolve to more readily infect humans.  “The biggest question is whether …

Michigan man accused of making explosives to target Satanic Temple in Massachusetts

Michigan man accused of making explosives to target Satanic Temple in Massachusetts

[ad_1] GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan man carrying explosives traveled to Massachusetts in 2023 and later said he wanted to blow up a building in Salem known as the Satanic Temple, according to a federal indictment. Luke Terpstra was charged in western Michigan with two felonies: transportation of an explosive and possession of an unregistered explosive. “Building explosive devices and transporting them with the intent to injure civilians and damage property puts us all at risk,” U.S. Attorney Mark Totten said Wednesday. The indictment was filed Tuesday. Terpstra, 30, of Grant, Michigan, is being held in the Newaygo County jail on related state charges. He faces a hearing in federal court next Monday. The court file doesn’t list an attorney yet who could speak for Terpstra. The Satanic Temple in Salem says it doesn’t believe in Satan but describes itself as a “non-theistic religious organization” that supports secularism. There is an art gallery at the site. Terpstra had an explosive device, multiple firearms and ammunition when he traveled to Salem in September, the …

From painting to pasta making — the best weekend hotel workshops in the UK

From painting to pasta making — the best weekend hotel workshops in the UK

[ad_1] Known for its lavish yet subdued interiors, alluring art collection and beautiful countryside, Heckfield Place bowls over newcomers, particularly those accustomed to travelling further from London for this style of home-from-home country stay. The hotel has made quite a reputation for itself in the food department, with Sky Glyngall’s Hearth restaurant acting as a masterclass in radically seasonal, simple-yet-sumptuous cooking, and the cocktails aren’t half bad here either, particularly with herbs plucked from the forest floor. That’s exactly how the Foraged Cocktail Making Workshop begins here, with guests foraging the wood like truffle pigs, in search of herbs, plants and flowers that can be used in cocktails. They then head back to base, where Heckfeld Place’s knowledgeable bar team will teach them what to do with their foraged treasures, and whether these work for house-made liqueurs and tinctures too. [ad_2] Source link

many countries around the world are making the killing of women a specific crime – here’s why it’s needed

many countries around the world are making the killing of women a specific crime – here’s why it’s needed

[ad_1] In 1782, a judge in England gave husbands the right to use violence on their wives as long as any implement used was not thicker than their thumb. This standard of measurement led to the coining of the term “rule of thumb”. Society has thankfully made enough progress to find such archaic ideas abhorrent. However, tens of thousands of women continue to be killed every year around the world just for being women. UN data shows that, on average, five women or girls are killed every hour by someone in their own family. Some countries are now passing laws to specifically criminalise femicide – an extreme manifestation of gender-based violence. The first documented use of the term “femicide” was in an 1801 book by Irish writer John Corry called A Satirical View of London at the Commencement of the Nineteenth Century where it was used to refer to the killing of a woman. The term was brought back in the 1970s by Diana E.H. Russell, a specialist in violence against women, who worked to …

What You Need to Know About Making a Good Impression

What You Need to Know About Making a Good Impression

[ad_1] Want to stay current with Arthur’s writing? Sign up to get an email every time a new column comes out. Around this time every year, I dispense a lot of advice to my graduate students, most of whom are on the job market. I get questions such as “How do I find a job that perfectly matches my strengths?” (A: You won’t, so stop worrying about it.) Or “Should I take a job and live in a different city than my spouse?” (A: No.) And very typically, “How do I make a good impression in an interview?” (A: Read on.) I find that some young people are extremely anxious about this last one, especially if they are naturally introverted and know it. They worry that their shyness makes them seem standoffish or uninterested; in an interview, of course, those traits can be deadly, so they are concerned that their introverted personality will hamstring their efforts. Undeniably, first impressions are extremely powerful—in work, romance, friendship, and almost every other part of life. People make judgments …

Artificial intelligence is making it hard to tell truth from fiction

Artificial intelligence is making it hard to tell truth from fiction

[ad_1] Taylor Swift has scores of newsworthy achievements, from dozens of music awards to several world records. But last January, the mega-star made headlines for something much worse and completely outside her control. She was a target of online abuse. Someone had used artificial intelligence, or AI, to create fake nude images of Swift. These pictures flooded social media. Her fans quickly responded with calls to #ProtectTaylorSwift. But many people still saw the fake pictures. That attack is just one example of the broad array of bogus media — including audio and visuals — that non-experts can now make easily with AI. Celebrities aren’t the only victims of such heinous attacks. Last year, for example, male classmates spread fake sexual images of girls at a New Jersey high school. AI-made pictures, audio clips or videos that masquerade as those of real people are known as deepfakes. This type of content has been used to put words in politicians’ mouths. In January, robocalls sent out a deepfake recording of President Joe Biden’s voice. It asked people …