All posts tagged: lower prices

Temu Will Bludgeon You Into Knowing Its Name

Temu Will Bludgeon You Into Knowing Its Name

Last night, the shopping app Temu, which is not quite a year and a half old, ran its second Super Bowl ad in as many years. It was hard to miss, because the same ad appeared several times, including following the game-winning touchdown. By most estimates, the three times the ad was featured in the middle of gameplay would have cost an eye-watering $21 million alone. Alongside ads in which Beyoncé announced a new album and Sir Patrick Stewart proposed skinning Peppa Pig to make a football, the content of Temu’s ad was comparatively unremarkable. It had no A-list celebrities or beloved cultural touchstones; not a single heartstring was tugged. Instead, a cast of silent, off-brand Pixar characters saw their wishes for 99-cent toupees and $6.99 jeans granted by an orange-gowned sorceress, who had herself been granted those powers by ordering the magical dress she was wearing from Temu for $9.99. All of this played out under a jingle that encouraged viewers to shop like a billionaire—which is to say to shop constantly, for fun …

The Lab-Diamond Revolution That Won’t Happen

The Lab-Diamond Revolution That Won’t Happen

Last year, a funny thing happened at Ring Concierge’s Manhattan showroom. A bride-to-be brought her engagement ring back to the popular jewelry store after wearing it for a few weeks and wanted to trade out her diamond for a worse one. The woman was worried that the original rock was too clear, too bright, too perfect for its large size, Ring Concierge’s CEO, Nicole Wegman, told me. She wanted to replace it with a lower-quality stone of a similar size—something a little less bright white. Brides sometimes bring in new rings for tweaks; maybe they want the fit adjusted, or they’re having second thoughts about the setting. Occasionally, they decide they want to pay the extra money to go bigger. That the central diamond is too good, however, is just not a complaint that jewelers get, except in cases of totally blown budgets. But this particular bride wasn’t worried that she’d spent too much money, Wegman said. In a sense, the bride was worried that she hadn’t spent enough. She and her fiancé had selected …

Review This Restaurant at Your Own Risk

Review This Restaurant at Your Own Risk

Dragon Lee, a family-owned Chinese restaurant in upstate New York, is a beloved place. On Google, it has a 4.3-star average, with high praise for its crab rangoon. Every once in a while, though, someone leaves unhappy. The food “was absolutely terrible,” a Google reviewer recently wrote in a one-star rating—so bad that he later called to ask if there had been a sudden change of chefs. (There had not.) The reviewer, who didn’t respond to an interview request, wrote that he threw most of his meal in the garbage. “I will never go back,” he wrote. “Disgusting!” Dragon Lee could have ignored the response, or apologized profusely. It did neither. “Learn to spell and use grammar,” the restaurant replied—calling out his misspelled “General Soe’s chicken.” The idea that Dragon Lee had changed chefs was laughable: Since the start of the pandemic, no one has wanted to work long hours in a hot kitchen. “WE DO NOT WANT TO DEAL WITH CUSTOMERS LIKE YOU AND YOU DO NOT DESERVE OUR SERVICE!” the restaurant concluded. “DO …