All posts tagged: low-income student of color

Rocking Out on the Campaign Trail

Rocking Out on the Campaign Trail

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. Politics is already a performance. Why also sing? First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: A Risk to Their Dignity Live music has the power to connect, to make people feel. In the hands of politicians, it also has the power to make them cringe. Last weekend, a video went viral of Vivek Ramaswamy, a businessman turned long-shot candidate in the Republican presidential primary, rapping Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” at the Iowa State Fair. (It was not even his first time performing the rap; he reportedly used to bust it out during his student days at Harvard.) In rapping, Ramaswamy joined a long line of political figures who have—at times endearingly, at times bafflingly—performed musical acts. To name a few: Bill Clinton played the saxophone periodically in the 1990s, including a rendition of “My Funny Valentine” at a …

Latino Alumni Want Legacy Admissions, Too

Latino Alumni Want Legacy Admissions, Too

In the ’90s, being a low-income student of color in the Ivy League was hard. Our population was miniscule. We were inside a place of privilege, but not fully part of it. The institution wasn’t built for us, and we knew it. We weren’t like the wealthy white kids whose alumni parents came to visit their favorite haunts in their favorite old college sweatshirts. But we were, we believed, part of a different future. And someday, we would have the chance to put on those sweatshirts ourselves and visit our own kids as students at our alma mater. We were writing a new chapter in these schools’ long histories, and we dreamed our children would be legacies. Now legacy admissions are under assault. In July, the group Lawyers for Civil Rights sued Harvard over its legacy-admissions policy, accusing it of violating Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and filed a complaint with the Department of Education. This sparked an investigation of Harvard by the Biden administration, and could lead to either a …