All posts tagged: Louise Glück’s PoetryWhat

The Books Briefing: Louise Glück Wrote With Authority

The Books Briefing: Louise Glück Wrote With Authority

This is an edition of the revamped Books Briefing, our editors’ weekly guide to the best in books. Sign up for it here. Last week, Louise Glück, one of America’s most celebrated poets, died at the age of 80. Glück was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama; she won a National Book Award, a Pulitzer Prize, and, three years before her death, the Nobel Prize in Literature (she was the first American poet to receive it since T. S. Eliot in 1948). She published widely, especially in The New Yorker; The Atlantic also published two of her poems, “Early December in Croton-on-Hudson” and “The Edge.” First, here are four new stories from The Atlantic’s Books section: When I heard about Glück’s death, what came to mind immediately were her famous lines “At the end of my suffering / there was a door”—the frank, breathtaking opening to “The Wild Iris,” the first poem in her collection of the same name. Then I read some of the lines my colleague Walt Hunter quoted in …