All posts tagged: LoraStephanie Bai

Biden’s candy-bar crusade – The Atlantic

Biden’s candy-bar crusade – The Atlantic

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. In his State of the Union address last night, President Joe Biden took on a new symbolic foe: shrinkflation. In attacking the practice, he’s trying to signal that he’s aligned with the common American against corporate greed—even if it’s not clear what he can actually do about the problem. First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: Snack-Food Foes Sesame Street characters have had their fuzzy fingers on the pulse of American life lately. First, Elmo triggered an avalanche of despair when he asked on X how everyone was doing. Then his castmate the Cookie Monster proclaimed earlier this week, “Me hate shrinkflation!” In his punchy, confrontational State of the Union speech last night, Biden conveyed a similar feeling. After outlining his accomplishments and his plans for the economy, the president denounced the way snack-food makers have been …

Why the + is everywhere

Why the + is everywhere

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. The plus sign is everywhere in the world of branding. It’s cool (sort of), capacious, and wholly unoriginal. At least it’s difficult to mock. First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: The Power of the Plus The other day, while reading an article in The Wall Street Journal about 23andMe’s glamorous rise and disappointing fall, I came across one line that I couldn’t stop thinking about: “As media companies launched streaming ‘+’ channels, [Anne] Wojcicki rolled out 23andMe+.” This detail gave me pause—here, too? But maybe I shouldn’t have been surprised to learn that the CEO of a biotech company had tacked on the symbol. The humble plus sign has become a hallmark branding tool in tech, media, TV streaming, and beyond. Streaming in particular is an industry overrun by the trend. At this point, nearly every …

The Joy of Glory-Free Sports

The Joy of Glory-Free Sports

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. For me, playing squash is not about achievement. That’s what makes it so much fun. First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: The genocide double standard The escalating cost of Trump’s lies Caffeine’s dirty little secret No Hope of Glory At a squash tournament in Grand Central Terminal last weekend, I watched the players in a women’s match move with elegant command of their bodies and their rackets. I was mesmerized by their liquid maneuvers as they whipped the tiny ball around a glass box constructed beneath the bronze chandeliers of the station. Whenever one of the players made an especially daring and deft move, I leaned over to my friend and whispered, “That’s me.” This joke was so amusing to us because although I have played squash with this friend, it is all I can do …

American workers are staying put

American workers are staying put

The Great Resignation is in the rearview mirror. What was it all about, anyway? Jake Warga / Getty January 9, 2024, 6:32 PM ET The “Great Resignation” is solidly in the rearview mirror. Why were so many people quitting, anyway? First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: Staying Put After a stretch of runaway quitting over the past few years—you might’ve heard it dubbed the “Great Resignation”—American workers are largely staying put. In July, the rates of American workers quitting their jobs normalized to about where they were before the pandemic. New data from the Labor Department’s Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey show that quit rates slid even further in November, the lowest they’ve been since September 2020. If you exclude those early COVID months, when layoffs were soaring and people were quitting their jobs at very low rates, quit rates are now at their lowest point since March 2018. The Great Resignation was to some extent a misnomer. People weren’t really dropping out of the workforce: Although Americans were leaving jobs …