All posts tagged: kimchi

BTS, Blackpink, Squid Game, kimchi … what’s the secret of South Korea’s world-conquering culture? | South Korea

BTS, Blackpink, Squid Game, kimchi … what’s the secret of South Korea’s world-conquering culture? | South Korea

How does this sound for a leisurely day of cultural immersion? Ablutions completed, apply a moisturising face mask infused with snail secretion against an audio backdrop of girl group Blackpink. For lunch, a bowl of bibimbap and a Bong Joon-ho film. In the evening, binge-watch zombie series All of Us Are Dead over spicy yangnyeom chicken and a bottle of strawberry soju. All this without setting foot inside their country of origin. Not even the fact that the all-conquering boyband BTS have been called up for military service can dampen the global appetite for all things South Korean. K-pop now regularly tops the US and UK charts. Three years after Squid Game became Netflix’s most-watched show ever, four years after Bong’s Parasite became the first non-English language film to win the best picture Oscar, with K-pop girl group Twice at No 1 on the US album chart, the Korean content juggernaut shows no sign of slowing down. In fact, western studios are now talking of a Korean “gold rush”. Netflix recently announced $2.5bn in investment …

The microbiome miracle: how to make your own kombucha, kefir, kimchi and kraut | Pickling, fermenting and preserving

The microbiome miracle: how to make your own kombucha, kefir, kimchi and kraut | Pickling, fermenting and preserving

Fermentation is as old as food itself. It is the method for making, among other things, miso, hot sauce, beer, salami, yoghurt, sourdough, cheese and coffee. Many chefs love the hypercharged flavour of fermented foods, but it is their health benefits that are increasingly taking centre stage. Sandor Katz, the author of The Art of Fermentation, has been coaxing readers into fermenting food since the 1990s. More recently, the epidemiologist Tim Spector (the co-founder of the Zoe health app), has homed in on what he calls “the four Ks” – kefir, kombucha, kimchi and kraut (sauer) – as being vital to keeping our microbiome healthy. Fermentation involves using microbes (such as bacteria and yeast) to break down carbohydrates in food under conditions in which there is no oxygen. During the process, these beneficial microbes break down sugars and starches into alcohols and acids, preserving the food so it can be stored for longer – and making it tasty. Fermented foods contain enzymes necessary for digestion, leading Spector to call them “fertiliser for our resident gut bacteria”. …

How to make your own kimchi

How to make your own kimchi

Sign up to IndyEat’s free newsletter for weekly recipes, foodie features and cookbook releases Get our food and drink newsletter for free Eating kimchi could have some impressive health benefits, according to new research. The fermented cabbage and vegetable dish is often linked to improving beneficial bacteria in the gut, and now a new study has found that the Korean classic may lower men’s overall risk of obesity. The results showed that men who ate one to three servings of cabbage kimchi a day had an 10 per cent lower risk of obesity when compared to men who ate less than one serving. The research, published in the journal BMJ Open, examined data for 115,726 people aged 40 to 69 in Korea. It also suggested that men and women who ate radish kimchi had around a 8-11 per cent reduced risk of fat around the middle and abdomen. So kimchi could be pretty good for you – as well as being delicious – but it’s not inexpensive to buy from the shop. If you’re keen …

Can kimchi really help you lose weight? Hold your pickle. The evidence isn’t looking great

Can kimchi really help you lose weight? Hold your pickle. The evidence isn’t looking great

Fermented foods have become popular in recent years, partly due to their perceived health benefits. For instance, there is some evidence eating or drinking fermented foods can improve blood glucose control in people with diabetes. They can lower blood lipid (fats) levels and blood pressure in people with diabetes or obesity. Fermented foods can also improve diarrhoea symptoms. But can they help you lose weight, as a recent study suggests? Let’s look at the evidence.   Remind me, what are fermented foods? Fermented foods are ones prepared when microbes (bacteria and/or yeast) ferment (or digest) food components to form new foods. Examples include yoghurt, cheese, kefir, kombucha, wine, beer, sauerkraut and kimchi. As a result of fermentation, the food becomes acidic, extending its shelf life (food-spoilage microbes are less likely to grow under these conditions). This makes fermentation one of the earliest forms of food processing. Fermentation also leads to new nutrients being made. Beneficial microbes (probiotics) digest nutrients and components in the food to produce new bioactive components (postbiotics). These postbiotics are thought to …

Meera Sodha’s vegan recipe for roast cauliflower and kimchi couscous salad | Salad

Meera Sodha’s vegan recipe for roast cauliflower and kimchi couscous salad | Salad

You can take the girl out of Scunthorpe, but you can’t take Scunthorpe out of the girl. This is possibly why I didn’t latch on to the bowl food movement a decade ago, but I’ve since grown, both as a woman and as a food writer (not physically, mind; I am still only 5ft 2in), and these days I can see the benefits of being able to fashion delicious ingredients, some of them ready-made, such as kimchi and hummus, over grains and binding them all together with a lovely dressing. It’s very useful to have a template with which to create a delicious, nutritious meal using whatever you have in the fridge, so now I’m on board with the bowl. Roast cauliflower and kimchi couscous bowl Keep the dressing and the condiments, but otherwise use this recipe as a rough guide – feel free to switch out the grain, roast vegetables and herbs for whatever you have. Prep 15 minCook 40 minServes 4 For the salad1 large cauliflower (or 2 small ones), trimmed and cut …

Eating kimchi every day may prevent weight gain, research suggests | Science & Tech News

Eating kimchi every day may prevent weight gain, research suggests | Science & Tech News

Eating kimchi every day could help people combat weight gain, research suggests. The Korean fermented cabbage and vegetable dish has been growing in popularity after studies suggested it may improve levels of beneficial bacteria in the gut. Now a new study has found cabbage kimchi may lower men’s risk of obesity, while kimchi made with radishes could help both men and women fight excess pounds. The research, published in the journal BMJ Open, examined data from 115,726 people aged 40 to 69 in Korea who were asked about their consumption of kimchi via food questionnaires. Men with a total intake of one to three servings per day had an 11-12% lower risk of obesity when compared to men who ate less than one serving per day. Meanwhile, those men with a higher intake of cabbage kimchi (up to three servings a day) had 10% lower odds of obesity and excess fat round their stomach and abdomen. The risk was 8% lower in women for this type of kimchi. Men and women who ate radish kimchi …

Kimchi and artisan cheeses can contain antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Kimchi and artisan cheeses can contain antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Kimchi, a traditional Korean dish made with salted and fermented vegetables, can contain antibiotic-resistant bacteria Magdalena Bujak/Alamy Fermented food such as kimchi and artisan cheeses can contain antibiotic-resistant bacteria, some of which have the potential to cause ill health. For more than 20 years, Hua Wang at The Ohio State University in Columbus has been working with manufacturers of fermented products, such as cheesemongers, to ensure they are free of antibiotic-resistant microbes. In her latest research, Wang and her colleagues looked for such microbes in 10 types of kimchi – a traditional Korean… Source link

Rukmini Iyer’s quick and easy recipe for kimchi fried rice with peas, prawns and pak choi | Vegetables

Rukmini Iyer’s quick and easy recipe for kimchi fried rice with peas, prawns and pak choi | Vegetables

I make many variations on fried rice at home, but this version, with prawns, pak choi and kimchi, is one of my favourites. And, bonus, you’ll find my top rice-cooking method below, which is all about the microwave (call it an Indian family innovation). You get perfect, separate grains every time, which is exactly what you want for fried rice. While the rice cooks, you can chop your ingredients so they’re ready to fry. A flavour-packed, 30-minute dinner. Kimchi fried rice with peas, prawns and pak choi Replace half the prawns with a couple of eggs, if you prefer – scramble them briefly at the side of the pan before adding the rice. Prep 10 minCook 30 minServes 4 200g white basmati or long-grain rice, rinsed, if you wish 3 garlic cloves, peeled, 1 left whole, 2 finely grated2 tbsp sesame oil5cm thumb of ginger, peeled and finely grated4 spring onions, trimmed and finely sliced3 pak choi, thinly sliced 150g frozen peas300g sustainably sourced large raw prawns1 tbsp soy sauce4 heaped tbsp kimchi, chopped if …

Cocktail of the week: Mexican Seoul’s kimchi bloody mary – recipe | Cocktails

Cocktail of the week: Mexican Seoul’s kimchi bloody mary – recipe | Cocktails

The perfect cure for the mistakes of New Year’s Eve, this brunch cocktail will jumpstart any hungover morning. It was developed in collaboration with the East London Liquor Co, and is light and refreshing, but with a subtle, fiery kick from the kimchi and gochugaru. Kimchi bloody mary Serves 1 50ml vodka – we use the East London Liquor Co’s10ml fresh lemon juice5ml standard 2:1 sugar syrup4 dashes Worcestershire sauce 100ml tomato juice20ml kimchi juice or sauce – we use Ajumma Republic’s kimchi sauce1-2 drops Tabasco, to taste To garnish (optional)1 piece kimchi, 1 cornichon and 1 lemon slice, all skewered on a cocktail stickA pinch of gochugaru (AKA Korean chilli powder) Fill a highball glass with ice. Add all the liquids and stir well to combine. Dress with the kimchi, pickle and lemon stick, sprinkle with gochugaru and serve. Source link