All posts tagged: kids

How To Talk To Children, Even If You’re Not A ‘Kid Person’

How To Talk To Children, Even If You’re Not A ‘Kid Person’

[ad_1] If you’re not a parent or in a job where you’re talking to kids every day, finding yourself face-to-face with a child can feel unnerving. What are you supposed to say to them? Do they even speak the same language? You don’t need any experience in parenting or teaching to make a positive connection with a kid in your life. You, too, were a child once upon a time, and if you can tap into those memories and find some common ground, you’ll be able to hold a real conversation with the next kid who pops up beside you at a wedding, family reunion or your coworker’s desk. We asked a couple of people who are experts in talking to kids about their tips for making conversation. Get Down On Their Level Literally, that is. If you’re standing, try coming down into a squatting or kneeling position so you’re both comfortably at eye level. This can help put a child at ease. “Sometimes we can forget the impact that we have on a young …

Why We Should Teach Kids About ‘Tricky People’ vs ‘Stranger Danger’

Why We Should Teach Kids About ‘Tricky People’ vs ‘Stranger Danger’

[ad_1] Growing up, your parents likely told you not to talk to strangers and to be wary of people you don’t know who might try to lure you away and harm you — also known as “stranger danger.” These days, however, top child safety experts are more likely to recommend teaching the concept of “tricky people” instead — and for good reason. It’s a term coined by child safety expert Pattie Fitzgerald, founder of safelyeverafter.com. She defines a tricky person as someone who “tricks” a kid or a parent into believing they’re a safe person when, in reality, they are not. They might ask a child (rather than another adult) for help, tell a kid to keep a secret from their parents, try to arrange alone time with them (like special outings that don’t include a parent), touch their body excessively and/or inappropriately, or invade their personal space. “A tricky person who intends to target a child often uses ‘grooming tricks’ to gain access and/or privacy with a child. This means gaining the trust of …

‘Our kids are not inheriting anything. There is no trust fund’

‘Our kids are not inheriting anything. There is no trust fund’

[ad_1] ‘Girls used to lie about their ages, but I can never lie about mine’ – Elisabeth Hoff Yasmin Le Bon is pleased that we’ve agreed to meet outside a café not far from her home in Putney, south-west London, because she’s been able to drop some shoes at the cobbler’s en route. “Multitasking,” she beams, before launching into a rant about the wasteland Putney High Street has become and how the Boots on her local shopping parade has closed down. “The lady there knew everyone’s names and what pills they needed,” she wails. So quotidian is the chat, you have to remind yourself you’re not nattering to an old friend or neighbour but to one of our greatest supermodels. Her face graced the covers of the very first editions of both US and UK Elle in the 1980s, who walked the runway for the likes of Chanel, headed campaigns for Dior, Ralph Lauren, Guess and Calvin Klein and also bagged her generation’s heartthrob: Duran Duran frontman Simon Le Bon – who has just been …

This 1 Food Decreases Kids’ Peanut Allergy Risk By 71%

This 1 Food Decreases Kids’ Peanut Allergy Risk By 71%

[ad_1] Peanut allergies can be deadly and may even be at least partly hereditary. However according to doctor, author, and TikToker Dr. Karan Rajan, it may be possible to reduce your child’s risk with items that are probably already in your kitchen cupboard. In a recent TikTok, the doctor shared that “if you own a tiny human, you can reduce their peanut allergies by 71% doing this one thing.” Which is? Giving your child the “equivalent of a heaped teaspoon” of peanut butter thrice weekly once they can take solids may lower their odds of developing the allergy, he says. That’s because, despite older advice to avoid the legumes until later in life, Dr. Rajan says “newer evidence suggests that avoiding peanuts in early age can actually increase the child’s likelihood for developing this dangerous allergy.” Dr Rajan went on to reference what we assume is a 2024 King’s College and US National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) follow-up study, which caught up on a randomised trial which fed …

‘More than my weekly wages’: London’s Paddington attraction and the growing cost of kids’ days out | Travel & leisure

‘More than my weekly wages’: London’s Paddington attraction and the growing cost of kids’ days out | Travel & leisure

[ad_1] As half-term drew to a close in England, families short on inspiration might have been grateful to learn of a new day out: on Friday, the Paddington Bear Experience opened its doors in London, promising a “unique and fun-filled interactive experience” spanning more than 2,400 sq metres (26,000 sq ft) and including themed rooms, character interactions – and marmalade sandwiches. But the experience comes at a cost: with weekend ticket prices of £49 for adults and £39 for children, a family of four can expect to pay £176 for the 70-minute event – and a lot more should they wish to peruse the books, games and toys available to buy in Mr Gruber’s antiques shop afterwards. The Paddington Bear Experience arrives at County Hall on the South­bank amid an apparent trend towards large-scale immersive “experiences” over traditional family days out, with far higher outlays attached. Visitors at the new Paddington Bear Experience on London’s South Bank. Photograph: Alex Brenner Also on offer in the same venue is Shrek’s Adventure! London, an immersive tour lasting …

America’s premier pronatalists on having ‘tons of kids’ to save the world, Marina Hyde on the election campaign trail, and is doing nothing the secret of happiness? – podcast | Life and style

America’s premier pronatalists on having ‘tons of kids’ to save the world, Marina Hyde on the election campaign trail, and is doing nothing the secret of happiness? – podcast | Life and style

[ad_1] Rishi Sunak is so convinced he can’t win he’s promising any old mad thing, while the Lib Dems are deliberately falling off paddleboards – Marina Hyde on the election. The couple on a mission to make it easier for everyone to have multiple children – Elon Musk (father of 11) is a supporter. Few of us have the money to take a long pause from work – but, as Anita Chaudhuri discovers, even a day can make a difference How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know [ad_2] Source link

These Are The Sweet Reasons Why Festivals Can Be A Great Place To Take Your Kids

These Are The Sweet Reasons Why Festivals Can Be A Great Place To Take Your Kids

[ad_1] With Glastonbury Festival being less than a month away, the UK is headed right into festival season. While we tend to associate festivals with loud music, drinking, and all-night partying, festivals are often also family affairs, with music-loving families taking their children from young ages. However, 42% of millennial parents don’t believe that festivals are good for boosting children’s wellbeing and confidence. According to Ginny Lalieu, a specialist in kids’ confidence, this couldn’t be further from the case and, in fact, festivals offer a wealth of benefits for children’s learning and confidence. The benefits of taking children to festivals Helps children to connect with nature Lalieu said: “Spending time outdoors at a festival allows children to connect with the natural world around them. “Nature has a calming effect on the mind and body, reducing stress and promoting well-being! Being surrounded by trees, plants and wildlife can evoke feelings of wonder and awe in children, which in turn boosts their mood and overall happiness.” This is all down to serotonin, also known as a ‘feel …

What should kids be taught about sex and relationships? | News

What should kids be taught about sex and relationships? | News

[ad_1] Last week, Rishi Sunak’s government issued new draft guidance on sex education. It included a ban on teaching sex education before children are nine years old and a ban on teaching “gender ideology”. Jo Morgan is the author of Empowering Relationships and Sex Education: a Practical Guide for Secondary School Teachers and the founder of the consultancy Engendering Change. She tells Helen Pidd why she believes children should be getting more comprehensive sex education, not less. She reflects on the questions children ask her about sex, and why limited education on sex, health and relationships can leave children vulnerable to abuse and misinformation. She argues that the age cut-offs could leave children without an understanding of personal boundaries and having their periods starting before they have been taught what they are. What should the next UK government prioritise when it comes to sex education? Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA Support The Guardian The Guardian is editorially independent. And we want to keep our journalism open and accessible to all. But we increasingly need our readers to …

Four kids left: The Thai school swallowed by the sea – video | Climate crisis

Four kids left: The Thai school swallowed by the sea – video | Climate crisis

[ad_1] Ban Khun Samut Chin, a coastal village in Samut Prakan province, Thailand, has been slowly swallowed by the sea over the past few decades. This has led to the relocation of the school and many homes, resulting in a dwindling population. Currently, there are only four students attending the school, often leaving just one in each classroom. The village has experienced severe coastal erosion, causing 1.1-2km (0.5-1.2 miles) of shoreline to disappear since the mid-1950s [ad_2] Source link

What kids bring to conversations

What kids bring to conversations

[ad_1] This is an edition of The Wonder Reader, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a set of stories to spark your curiosity and fill you with delight. Sign up here to get it every Saturday morning. “During most of my early adulthood, philosophy had little appeal to me,” Elissa Strauss wrote in 2022. “As long as I treated people mostly kindly, what did it matter what I thought about right and wrong, or the nature of knowledge or the universe?” “Until, of course, I had my first child.” Strauss’s son Augie “wanted to know things”—including the sorts of things she couldn’t find much practical use for when she tried taking Philosophy 101 in college. Kids, she soon realized, are instinctive philosophers. Today’s newsletter takes a look at how kids speak and how to speak to them in moments of curiosity, joy, and conflict. On Talking With Kids Want to Understand Socrates and Sartre? Talk With Your Kid. By Elissa Strauss A new book asks us to consider that children might have a natural …