All posts tagged: Hong Kong

The British judges ruling on the law in authoritarian Hong Kong – podcast | News

The British judges ruling on the law in authoritarian Hong Kong – podcast | News

[ad_1] Since 1997, British and Commonwealth judges have sat in the highest court in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong legal system is derived from English common law and foreign judges, including those from the UK, have been said to add expertise and prestige to its court system. But in 2020 Beijing imposed a strict national security law to clamp down on pro-democracy protests. Since then the number of foreign judges has fallen as fears grow that the judges are lending credibility to a system where basic rights and freedoms are not being respected. On Monday one of Hong Kong’s best known pro-democracy activists, the jailed media mogul Jimmy Lai, will be appealing against one of his convictions. Like many people in Hong Kong he is a British citizen, and one of the judges who will hear his appeal is also British. Campaigners have said it is a shocking situation and called on the three remaining British judges – who are retired but are all in the House of Lords – to quit. Amy Hawkins explains …

Hong Kong is targeting Western Big Tech companies in its new ban of a popular protest song

Hong Kong is targeting Western Big Tech companies in its new ban of a popular protest song

[ad_1] The key difference between this action and previous attempts to remove content is that this is a civil injunction, unlike a criminal prosecution—meaning it is, at least legally speaking, closer to a copyright takedown request. In turn, a platform could arguably be less likely to take a reputational hit as long as it removes the content upon request.  Kwong believes this will indeed make platforms more likely to cooperate and there have already been pretty clear signs to that effect. In one hearing in December, the government was asked by the court to consult online platforms for the feasibility of the injunction. The final judgment this week says that while the platforms “have not taken part in these proceedings, they have indicated that they are ready to accede to the Government’s request if there is a court order.” “The actual targets in this case, mainly the tech giants, may have less hesitation to comply with a civil court order than a national security order because if it’s the latter, they may also face backfire …

Alex Crawford slams ’empty’ press freedom words with no Gaza action

Alex Crawford slams ’empty’ press freedom words with no Gaza action

[ad_1] The panel at the Reporters Without Borders World Press Freedom Index 2024 launch. Left to right: freelance Hong Konger journalist Jessie Lau; RSF London bureau chief Fiona O’Brien; Sky News special correspondent Alex Crawford; Foreign Press Association London director Deborah Bonetti; RSF director of campaigns Rebecca Vincent; and Eritrean filmmaker and campaigner Vanessa Tsehaye. Picture: Press Gazette Sky News special correspondent Alex Crawford has said press freedom speeches given by the Prime Minister and Culture Secretary this week amounted to “empty words” in light of the ongoing Israeli ban on journalists entering Gaza. Crawford, who in February organised an open letter from 55 foreign correspondents pleading for the Israeli government to allow some international journalists into Gaza, said “there is no freedom of information” when reporters cannot get on the ground. Crawford was speaking on Friday as part of a launch event for the 2024 World Press Freedom Index produced by Reporters Without Borders (RSF). [Read more: RSF Press Freedom Index 2024 — UK and US scores hit by widespread job cuts] Alex Crawford: …

Most countries in Asia see decline in press freedom

Most countries in Asia see decline in press freedom

[ad_1] Bangkok —  Global media watchdog Reporters Without Borders, or RSF, says press freedom in Asia continues to see a decline, with 26 out of 31 countries falling on its annual index. According to the group’s latest press freedom index, Asia is the second-most difficult region for practicing journalism. Five countries in the region — Myanmar, China, North Korea and Vietnam — are among the world’s 10 most dangerous countries for media professionals in the 2024 rankings. There are no countries in the Asia-Pacific region in the top 15 ranking for press freedom. China, North Korea and Vietnam, three of the world’s remaining communist governments, have long been near the bottom of RSF’s press freedom index ranking of 180 countries. This year, China was ranked 172, Vietnam 174 and North Korea 177. Overall, it’s the countries and territories that have shown a drop in press freedom in recent years that have contributed to East Asia becoming a difficult place for media to operate. Hong Kong was once a model for press freedom in the Asia …

Asia’s first spot bitcoin, ether ETFs start trading in Hong Kong

Asia’s first spot bitcoin, ether ETFs start trading in Hong Kong

[ad_1] HONG KONG: Hong Kong on Tuesday (Apr 30) launched trading of Asia’s first spot bitcoin and ether exchange-traded funds (ETFs), moving forward in the city’s race to become a regional virtual asset investment hub. The debut comes three months after the United States gave the green light to ETFs pegged to bitcoin’s spot price, making it easier for mainstream investors to add the unit to their portfolio. Hong Kong’s pioneering crypto ETFs on the city’s bourse include six funds issued by three managers – Bosera Funds, China Asset Management (Hong Kong) Limited and Harvest Global Investments. Each company issued a spot bitcoin and a spot ether ETF, which can be traded in both Hong Kong and US dollars, while ChinaAMC (HK) also allowed trading in the Chinese yuan. “These are the first spot ETF products of virtual assets in (the) Asia market, which has proven Hong Kong’s leading status in virtual asset development in the region,” Joseph Chan, the city’s undersecretary for financial services, said at the bell tolling ceremony in the morning. He …

US Congress seeks to change Hong Kong office’s address to Jimmy Lai Way

US Congress seeks to change Hong Kong office’s address to Jimmy Lai Way

[ad_1] Washington —  Two U.S. congressmen have introduced a bill to rename the street in front of Hong Kong’s de facto embassy in Washington as “Jimmy Lai Way” in honor of the jailed media entrepreneur. The bill would also apply the name change to the mailing address for the office, officially known as the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office. Rep. Chris Smith of New Jersey announced the bill in a statement Thursday, saying he and the bill’s co-author, Rep. Tom Suozzi of New York, wanted to honor the “renowned Hong Kong human rights defender who remains unjustly imprisoned by Hong Kong authorities.” Authorities jailed the 76-year-old founder of Hong Kong media group Next Digital, formerly Next Media, in December 2020 after accusing him of fraud. They also charged him with “conspiracy to collude with foreign countries or external forces to endanger national security” under Hong Kong’s National Security Law. The cases are still ongoing, and Lai has been denied bail. In the statement, Smith, who is chairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, called …

China bubble tea chain Chabaidao plunges on Hong Kong debut

China bubble tea chain Chabaidao plunges on Hong Kong debut

[ad_1] HONG KONG: Shares in Chinese bubble-tea chain Baicha Baidao plunged nearly 40 per cent on its first trading day in Hong Kong on Tuesday, in a fresh blow to the finance hub’s efforts to revive its markets. The Chengdu-based company, which is also known as Chabaidao, raised about HK$2.59 billion (US$330 million) during its November initial public offering – with no others topping it since. But soon after opening it plunged from its HK$17.50 listing price to HK$10.80, marking a drop of 38 per cent, before paring some of the losses to end at HK$12.80. The plunge marked the worst debut since 2015 for a company that had raised at least US$300 million, according to Bloomberg. Another debutant, Tianjin Construction Development Group, tanked more than 30 per cent, having raised about US$20 million in its IPO. The losses dealt a blow to the government’s plan to help reboot Hong Kong’s trading market, which has seen a drop in fundraising through new listings for four years in a row. But Hong Kong’s security chief-turned-city leader …

All aboard the ‘ding ding’! A wild ride through Hong Kong – in pictures | Art and design

All aboard the ‘ding ding’! A wild ride through Hong Kong – in pictures | Art and design

[ad_1] Workers on bamboo scaffolding in North Point. ‘I was desperate to capture Hong Kong anew: its lights, its colours, its contours. On my days off I would ride trams and ferries for hours on end, obsessing about possible scenes I had in mind. And yet the more I photographed, the more I worried about what might still go unseen before the city changed irrevocably – or I had to leave’ [ad_2] Source link

China says Hong Kong must ‘tightly hold’ national security line

China says Hong Kong must ‘tightly hold’ national security line

[ad_1] HONG KONG —  China’s top official on Hong Kong affairs said the city should focus on national security to protect development, in a speech coming weeks after the enactment of sweeping new security laws. “To move towards governance and prosperity, we need to tightly hold onto the bottom line of national security in order to safeguard the high quality development of Hong Kong,” said the director of Beijing’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, Xia Baolong, in a speech to mark an annual national security day. Hong Kong in March enacted a new national security law, also known as Article 23, that updates or introduces new laws to prohibit treason, sabotage, sedition, the theft of state secrets and espionage, with jail terms of up to life imprisonment. Xia, however, sought to emphasize that the law posed no threat to investors, at a time when the city has faced Western criticism of a protracted crackdown on dissent, and has struggled economically and financially. “For the general public of Hong Kong and foreign investors, this law …

US treads carefully in responding to Hong Kong’s new national security law

US treads carefully in responding to Hong Kong’s new national security law

[ad_1] WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. has denounced Hong Kong’s new national security law as a tool to potentially silence dissent both at home and abroad, but so far the action from Washington has been notably muted, disappointing those fighting for the Chinese territory’s democracy and freedoms. Since the law’s swift passage on March 19, the U.S. has announced visa restrictions on an unspecified number of unnamed Hong Kong officials but taken no further action. That’s a far cry from 2020, when Beijing imposed national security restrictions to end months of unrest on Hong Kong streets. The U.S. responded by hitting the city’s highest-ranking officials with sanctions and depriving the territory of its preferential trading status. While the new law, known as Article 23, now expands the Hong Kong government’s powers to go after those it accuses of spying and to target dissidents anywhere in the world, Washington has been treading carefully. The State Department declined to preview or comment on any potential actions but said it is considering all options. Analysts suggest the Biden …