All posts tagged: Hollywood Flashback

‘Cimarron’ Explored Similar Story as Killers of the Flower Moon

‘Cimarron’ Explored Similar Story as Killers of the Flower Moon

[ad_1] Ninety-two years before Martin Scorsese’s Killers of the Flower Moon would wrestle with Osage County’s troubling history, there was another Oscar-nominated film that explored the very same Oklahoma terrain, even if it did so with kid gloves on. 1931’s Cimarron is best remembered today — if it’s remembered at all — for its epic opening land-rush sequence (it required a week of shooting, 5,000 extras and 28 cameramen). Directed by Wesley Ruggles, who like Scorsese also helmed an adaptation of The Age of Innocence, Cimarron was the first Western to win a best picture statuette — and remained the only one until Dances With Wolves galloped onto the big screen 59 years later.  In 1931, the talkie experiment was only 4 years old and Tinseltown was in the throes of a seismic shift — something that THR noted in its review at the time: “Whether or not another movie as great is soon filmed, Cimarron must stand as the first of the talkers to surpass all screen entertainment. It will go on record as …

When Costa-Gavras’ ‘Z’ Ventured Into New Oscar Territory

When Costa-Gavras’ ‘Z’ Ventured Into New Oscar Territory

[ad_1] “Any resemblance to real events and dead or living people is not a coincidence. It is INTENTIONAL.” So reads a title card at the beginning of Costa-Gavras’ Z, set in an unnamed Mediterranean country that could stand in for any number of police states torn between Russian and American influence at the height of the Cold War. The 1969 Franco-Algerian production was fittingly international: While the dialogue (by Spanish writer Jorge Semprún) is in French, the plot itself, based on a book by Greek author Vassilis Vassilikos, adheres to events in Greece following the 1963 assassination of a popular pacifist candidate (whose counterpart is played by Yves Montand) who’d dared to oppose the ruling junta. The titular letter, painted across the street in a climactic scene, was a protest slogan that meant “He lives.” “Here is the new Hitchcock we have been awaiting,” crowed THR about the Greek director. “Whatever the political commitments of its makers, Z is a slick, knockout of a political thriller, the fictional anonymity of its real life setting and …

Married to the Mob Becomes TikTok Trend Amid 30th Anniversary

Married to the Mob Becomes TikTok Trend Amid 30th Anniversary

[ad_1] More than 30 years ago, Married to the Mob was a bona fide hit, well before making its mark as a TikTok trend. Jonathan Demme’s comedy stars Michelle Pfeiffer as Angela de Marco, who is fed up with her Long Island Mafia-adjacent lifestyle and eyes a new path after her husband, Frank (Alec Baldwin), is killed by his crime boss (Dean Stockwell).  Edward Saxon, a producer on the film, tells THR that Demme encouraged the crew — including costume designer Colleen Atwood, who has since won four Oscars — to embrace the outlandish nature of the project. “Jonathan didn’t say to anybody, ‘Tamp it down,’ ” Saxon recalls. “It was, ‘Let’s have fun with this.’ And that describes the mob wife costumes.”  Before its release from Orion Pictures on Aug. 19, 1988, the distributor’s president, Joel H. Resnick, was feeling bullish, telling THR at the time that there was “good audience response to the film, and exhibitors responded very strongly to it.” Married to the Mob collected $21 million ($55 million today), along with an Oscar nomination for …

When Survival Story Alive Released in Theaters

When Survival Story Alive Released in Theaters

[ad_1] More than three decades before Netflix’s Society of the Snow, which revisits the true story of the 1972 Andes flight disaster, Alive made an indelible impact. Frank Marshall directed the 1993 movie that was produced by his wife, Kathleen Kennedy, and focuses on the Uruguay rugby team’s chartered flight that crashed en route to a game in Chile.  Based on the 1974 nonfiction book by Piers Paul Read, the film starred Ethan Hawke as Nando Parrado, one of 16 survivors (out of 45 on board) rescued two months after the accident. Parrado served as technical adviser for Alive and talked with castmembers about the ordeal, which involved passengers resorting to cannibalism to survive. The film depicted the harrowing crash using VFX tricks from Industrial Light & Magic. “We are trying to create a realistic plane crash and not throw you out of the movie by having something that looks like it doesn’t have any weight or for which the perspective is wrong,” Marshall told THR at the time. Vincent Spano, who played the team …

Irene Cara’s ‘Flashdance… What a Feeling’ Had It All in 1984 – The Hollywood Reporter

Irene Cara’s ‘Flashdance… What a Feeling’ Had It All in 1984 – The Hollywood Reporter

[ad_1] The opening synthesizer lines of the song “Flashdance… What a Feeling” offer a sense of promise — something big is about to happen. And the tune, performed by actress and singer Irene Cara for the soundtrack of 1983’s Flashdance, delivered, becoming a hit single and winning the Oscar for best original song in 1984. In fact, it was the only award that the film won, though the drama was also nominated for cinematography, editing and again in the original song category, for another synth-pop hit, “Maniac.” Producer Jerry Bruckheimer enlisted composer and producer Giorgio Moroder, with whom he had worked on the 1980 film American Gigolo, to write the music for Flashdance, about an aspiring ballet dancer, played by Jennifer Beals, who works by day as a welder and by night as a cabaret performer. Moroder, an electronic music pioneer who had won an Academy Award for his score for 1978’s Midnight Express, brought on Keith Forsey and Cara to write the lyrics for “What a Feeling.” The song was released in March 1983 …