All posts tagged: Hirst

Damien Hirst Formaldehyde Sculptures Face Reports of Fuzzy Dating

Damien Hirst Formaldehyde Sculptures Face Reports of Fuzzy Dating

[ad_1] One of Damien Hirst’s signature works, an $8 million, 13-foot tiger shark split into three sections, each suspended in formaldehyde, serves as a main attraction of the luxury bar at the Palm Hotel and Resort in Las Vegas. That work has been thought to been made during the 1990s, the period when Hirst was still on the rise—but now its date has been thrown into question. This week, the Guardian ran two articles about several Hirst works that were said to have been produced during the 1990s. In fact, the Guardian reported, these works were actually produced more recently, with the Las Vegas work made in 2017, not 1999. Related Articles The Las Vegas shark is the fourth of Hirst’s formaldehyde sculptures to reportedly have a nearly 20-year discrepancy in its dating. That sculpture first appeared in 2018 under the title The Unknown (Explored, Explained, Exploded) when it was installed at the Palms. The hotel and the sculpture were purchased by Frank J. Fertitta III and his brother Lorenzo Fertitta, the resort and casinos scions who made …

Damien Hirst shark that sold for about m is fourth 2017 work dated to 1990s | Damien Hirst

Damien Hirst shark that sold for about $8m is fourth 2017 work dated to 1990s | Damien Hirst

[ad_1] A Damien Hirst shark preserved in formaldehyde that was purchased by American billionaires was dated to the 1990s even though it was not made until 2017. The 4-metre (13ft) tiger shark, dissected into three parts, is the centrepiece of a luxury bar in the Palms casino resort in Las Vegas. It first appeared in the casino six years ago, with the title: The Unknown (Explored, Explained, Exploded), 1999. However, an investigation by the Guardian has established that it was made in 2017, almost two decades after the date publicly ascribed to the work. The sculpture was bought by the billionaire brothers Lorenzo Fertitta and Frank Fertitta III, amid suggestions it cost around $8m. The huge shark is the fourth formaldehyde sculpture by Hirst now known to have been made in 2017, despite having been dated to the 1990s. The other three, made with a dove, a small shark and two calves, have in recent years been exhibited with 1990s dates in galleries in Hong Kong, New York, Oxford and London. The revelation some of …

Damien Hirst formaldehyde animal works dated to 1990s were made in 2017 | Damien Hirst

Damien Hirst formaldehyde animal works dated to 1990s were made in 2017 | Damien Hirst

[ad_1] Three Damien Hirst sculptures that were made by preserving animals in formaldehyde were dated by his company to the 1990s even though they were made in 2017, an investigation by the Guardian has found. The trio of works, made by preserving a dove, a shark and two calves, have in recent years been exhibited in galleries in Hong Kong, New York, Munich, London and Oxford as examples of works from the 1990s, his Turner prize-winning period. However, all three were made by Hirst’s employees at a workshop in Dudbridge, Gloucestershire in 2017. The artworks first appeared at an exhibition at Gagosian’s Hong Kong art gallery that same year. The show, Visual Candy and Natural History, was billed as an exhibition of the artist’s works “from the early to mid-1990s”. Among the artworks on show were three formaldehyde sculptures that had never been seen in public before. They included Cain and Abel, 1994, which consisted of twin calves that appeared side-by-side in white boxes, and Dove, 1999, which featured a bird, wings outstretched as if …

Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin among thousands of British artists used to train AI software, Midjourney | Artificial intelligence (AI)

Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin among thousands of British artists used to train AI software, Midjourney | Artificial intelligence (AI)

[ad_1] Since the emergence of Midjourney and other image generators, artists have been watching and wondering whether AI is a great opportunity or an existential threat. Now, after a list of 16,000 names emerged of artists whose work Midjourney had allegedly used to train its AI – including Bridget Riley, Damien Hirst, Rachel Whiteread, Tracey Emin, David Hockney and Anish Kapoor – the art world has issued a call to arms against the technologists. British artists have contacted US lawyers to discuss joining a class action against Midjourney and other AI firms, while others have told the Observer that they may bring their own legal action in the UK. “What we need to do is come together,” said Tim Flach, president of the Association of Photographers and an internationally acclaimed photographer whose name is on the list. “This public showing of this list of names is a great catalyst for artists to come together and challenge it. I personally would be up for doing that.” The 24-page list of names forms Exhibit J in a …