All posts tagged: guilt

Nicholas Galitzine Says He Feels ‘Guilt’ For Portraying Multiple Queer Characters

Nicholas Galitzine Says He Feels ‘Guilt’ For Portraying Multiple Queer Characters

[ad_1] After rising to fame by playing queer characters in the rom-com Red, White & Royal Blue and the drama miniseries Mary & George, Nicholas Galitzine is clearing the air about his own sexuality. “I identify as a straight man,” Nicholas said in a new British GQ interview published on Wednesday. “But I have been a part of some incredible queer stories.” The British actor admitted he felt torn about taking on so many LGBTQ+ roles because of his heterosexuality. “I felt a sense of uncertainty sometimes about whether I’m taking up someone’s space, and perhaps guilt,” he explained. “At the same time, I see those characters as not solely their sexuality.” Nicholas with co-star Taylor Zakhar Perez in Red, White And Royal Blue Jonathan Prime/Prime Video The Idea of You star went on to clarify that the characters he plays on screen are totally separate from who he is off the clock, adding: “I am Nick, and I’m not my role.” Speaking with HuffPost UK, the English actor explained the “plethora of reasons” why …

Parents Reveal The REAL Reasons Behind ‘Mum Guilt’

Parents Reveal The REAL Reasons Behind ‘Mum Guilt’

[ad_1] We’ve all been there — feeling a sense of shame or guilt when you think you haven’t done enough as a parent. This feeling is popularly known as ‘mum guilt’ and it turns out, it’s very common. For me it’s usually triggered when I feel like I haven’t given my toddler the most nutritious food if we’ve had a very busy day. Other times it’s when I have lots of housework to keep up with and I end up letting my toddler have some screen time. But what I’ve slowly understood is that as parents we are just trying our best with the time we have, and beating ourselves up over every little thing that our toddlers probably don’t even notice isn’t very helpful to our own mental wellbeing. For example, if I’ve given my child oven food for one or two lunches because I haven’t had time to cook, at least she’s been fed. At the end of it I should be looking at the positives more than the negatives. Other parents might …

Olly Murs shares new video of baby Madison after opening up about ‘dad guilt’

Olly Murs shares new video of baby Madison after opening up about ‘dad guilt’

[ad_1] Olly Murs couldn’t be more besotted by his little girl, Madison, and on Saturday, the singer was captured adorably singing to his little girl.  The former X Factor star, 39,  welcomed his little girl Madison, whom he affectionately calls Madi, with his beautiful wife, Amelia, last week. Taking to his Instagram Stories, the dad-of-one shared a touching video of himself, cradling the newborn whilst singing his song ‘Cry Your Heart Out’. See the adorable moment in the video below. Olly Murs sings to baby girl Madison in adorable new video The pop star is just one week into fatherhood and on Friday, he revealed he is already suffering from ‘dad guilt’ whilst on stage having jetted off to join Take That on tour just 48 hours after their baby girl’s arrival. After reuniting with his bundle of joy this week, he took to the stage at the O2 Area and confessed: “It’s been the most craziest time. Cos obviously on one hand I’ve got this beautiful baby girl, my wife is at home looking after her …

Religious imagery for a spiritually syncretic era

Religious imagery for a spiritually syncretic era

[ad_1] (RNS) — When pop icon Taylor Swift disclosed her religion in the 2020 Netflix documentary “Miss Americana,” she was unambiguous. “I live in Tennessee. I’m a Christian. That’s not what we stand for,” she said in 2018 in response to Tennessee Republican Marsha Blackburn’s opposition to the Violence Against Women Act and LGBTQ rights. But these days, Swift’s faith appears more fluid. Her religious references are as eclectic as a Brooklyn thrift shop — well-worn Christian metaphors sit alongside a more bohemian mishmash of witchcraft, divination and paganism. Her newest release, “The Tortured Poets Department,” is a patchwork of religious allusions, from good Samaritans and Jehovah’s Witnesses to altar sacrifices and prophecies. Whatever her personal beliefs, the syncretism displayed in the sprawling 31-song double album — which racked up 300 million listens in 24 hours, making it Spotify’s most streamed album in one day — is emblematic of the religious mishmash of millennial and Generation Z religion writ large. These days, roughly 28% of U.S. adults identify as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular,” and …

Guilt stopped me from planning my wedding

Guilt stopped me from planning my wedding

[ad_1] Following a fairy tale Disney proposal, I got engaged four years ago. As someone who played weddings with their toys and dreamt of their own Prince Charming carrying them into the sunset their whole life, you’d probably imagine the princess proposal was everything I wished for, but it didn’t quite work out like that. I’d been the girl who made veils for my dolls out of squares of toilet tissue sticky taped together and as I grew older, I secretly practised Mrs Louise ‘insert surname of crush here’ in my diaries. I was so looking forward to being a bride, so why have I dragged my feet when it comes to wedding planning? Louise and Liam got engaged four years ago The answer is guilt, and it was robbing me of my joy. Let’s rewind. Years back, I went to university and fell in love. Not long after, I was choosing a ring and wafting around wedding fayres feeling fizzy with anticipation for what would surely be the most perfect day of my life. …

Commentary: Parking mum guilt at the door

Commentary: Parking mum guilt at the door

[ad_1] MUM GUILT The Cleveland Clinic, a non-profit academic medical centre, defines “mum guilt” as the name given to the feelings of guilt and shame some people feel when they do not live up to their own or others’ expectations in their role as a parent – an internal dialogue that tells you that you are failing as a caregiver. It is unsurprising, especially in this age of social media where “it mums” seem to juggle work, motherhood and marriage with such glamour and aplomb. Sure, we all know that the Insta-life comes with a whole bunch of literal and figurative filters, but it is hard to not be one part wistful, one part envious, and two parts feeling like we could and should do better. Indeed, 80 per cent of mothers in Singapore who have children of all ages grapple with “mum guilt”, according to a 2019 survey by Focus on the Family Singapore. Suffice to say, that is a lot of mothers having a lot of guilt. A lot of the time. Debbie …

The Traitors: Betrayal! Guilt! Claudia Winkleman’s hair! Series one stars spill their secrets ahead of final shows | Ents & Arts News

The Traitors: Betrayal! Guilt! Claudia Winkleman’s hair! Series one stars spill their secrets ahead of final shows | Ents & Arts News

[ad_1] From the secret couple to the mic-drop “parting gift” of the final, The Traitors became a sleeper hit when the first series launched just over a year ago. It’s back and even bigger this time round, with millions following the game of cat and mouse as each permanently paranoid contestant tries to convince the others they are indeed 100% faithful. The Traitors is the perfect reality game show for 2024 – savage but not cruel, a social experiment with pantomime villains but also genuine emotion, and full of memeable moments and cliffhanger endings courtesy of fatal kisses and poisoned chalices. Plus, it has the ability to swamp Google with style searches thanks to host Claudia Winkleman’s modern country/Gothic vamp wardrobe. Because the desire to shop, let’s face it, is the thing every good reality show should invoke. (Princess Anne meets Ronnie Corbett meets Madonna when she married Guy Ritchie, is the the style she’s channelling, apparently). Image: Where betrayal lurks around every corner. Pic: BBC/Studio Lambert/LLara Plaza For the few who haven’t seen the …

A Skeptical Approach to Guilt and Innocence in the Judicial Realm

A Skeptical Approach to Guilt and Innocence in the Judicial Realm

[ad_1] The criminal justice system, in theory, must be impartial. The only admissible considerations within the system, in theory, are intended to derive from a dispassionate weighing of facts in evidence. This dispassionate, logical approach—deriving in many ways from Enlightenment philosophy—is frequently taken for granted, at least implicitly. Yet the realm of criminal justice is fraught with anomalies, many of which have their roots in human psychology rather than in the abstractions of legal theory. Major cases attest to this fact. The Scott Peterson criminal trial of 2004, in which Peterson’s pregnant wife was murdered, resulted in Peterson’s conviction for the crime despite there being no direct physical evidentiary connection from the crime to Peterson. The Wesson multiple murder of Marcus Wesson’s own children in Central California, also in 2004, did provide direct evidentiary connections, but some specific connections were incompletely or inaccurately conveyed to the jury. The juries convicted. Such anomalies pose some difficulty because the proceedings in criminal investigations and trials are supposed to be based, quite literally, on skeptical inquiry. In line …

A Forgotten Man review – handsome but listless Swiss war guilt drama | Drama films

[ad_1] Spring, 1945. Heinrich Zwygart (Michael Neuenschwander), the Swiss ambassador to Germany, is recalled to Bern following the surrender of the Nazis. But the glorious homecoming that he had hoped for is shadowed by the controversial decisions he made during the war, in the service of perpetuating and protecting Swiss neutrality. Peacetime, for Heinrich, may prove to be more dangerous than war. A handsome period piece, shot in striking black and white, A Forgotten Man tackles an intriguing theme, but it’s a little too airless and inert in approach to bring this murky corner of European history to life. [ad_2] Source link

A moment that changed me: I heard people sneer at me – and my mummy guilt turned to anger | Life and style

[ad_1] I was invited to speak at a travel conference in Dublin in 2013 and I brought my 18-month-old toddler with me to the event. As a professional travel writer and photographer, my presentations had been well-received, and my daughter ran around the conference on wobbly feet, charming fellow speakers and attenders. Afterwards, I took my daughter and my friend Germaine, who had come along to support me, to the pub reserved for attenders. That was when I heard their sneers. Four people – three men and a woman – were sitting right across from me, sharing the same table, throwing loaded looks and loud-whispering for my benefit. “Who brings a kid here?” I heard one of the men saying. Their hushed conversation said it all. I was a “bad mother”. Ten years later, I still replay that moment over in my mind. Up until that point, I had always shrunk with guilt whenever I travelled for work. After all, I lived in Stockholm and Sweden’s parental leave was one of the most generous in …