All posts tagged: grown-ups

​​​​​​​Whatever Happened to Teen Babysitters?

​​​​​​​Whatever Happened to Teen Babysitters?

[ad_1] Babysitting used to be both a job and a rite of passage. For countless American teens, and especially teen girls, it was a tentative step toward adulthood—responsibility, but with guardrails. Perhaps you didn’t cook dinner, but you did heat some leftovers for the kids. Maybe you arrived to find them already tucked in, and you read them a story, turned out the lights, and watched TV until the car turned into the drive. You knew who to call if anything serious came up. Paula Fass, a historian of childhood at UC Berkeley, told me that she started sitting around 1960, when she was 12 or 13. By the time she’d arrive, she remembers, the parents had put their kids to bed and stocked the fridge for her to raid. They recognized that she was grown-up enough to be an extra eye in the home—but childlike enough to go looking for snacks. Sitting was a “quintessentially American experience,” Yasemin Besen-Cassino, a Montclair State University sociologist and the author of The Cost of Being a Girl: …

How Mike Birbiglia Got Sneaky-Famous

How Mike Birbiglia Got Sneaky-Famous

[ad_1] Early next year, on January 24, the comedian Mike Birbiglia will perform in Walla Walla, Washington, for the first time since the night in 2005 when he nearly died after sleepwalking—sleep-running—through the second-story window of his hotel room at a La Quinta Inn. He’d been having issues with sleepwalking for years, and on this night, he was dreaming that a missile had been fired on his infantry platoon, so he took drastic evasive measures. He crash-landed on the grass and started running, until he realized he was awake, and in his underwear, and covered in blood and shards of glass, one of which was embedded in his thigh, a centimeter from his femoral artery. “I know,” he says whenever he recounts this moment onstage, responding to the gasps from the audience. “I’m in the future too.” Birbiglia first told this story at the climax of his 2008 breakthrough off-Broadway solo show, Sleepwalk With Me. He’s made five Netflix specials, and with each one, the rooms get bigger, the runs get longer, and the storytelling …

A cathartic watch – The Atlantic

A cathartic watch – The Atlantic

[ad_1] This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. Welcome back to The Daily’s Sunday culture edition, in which one Atlantic writer reveals what’s keeping them entertained. Today’s special guest is Elizabeth Bruenig, a staff writer at The Atlantic who covers politics, culture, and religion. Liz rewatches Manchester by the Sea when she needs a good cry, checks Instagram for baking recipes, and can no longer stomach the aughts-era emo songs she loved as an eyeliner-wearing teen. First, here are three Sunday reads from The Atlantic: The Culture Survey: Elizabeth Bruenig An actor I would watch in anything: Anya Taylor-Joy. I love her choice of projects, and I could look at her mesmerizing face for hours. My favorite blockbuster and favorite art movie: My favorite blockbuster: Casino Royale. Has anyone ever looked as elegant as Eva Green does in that movie? She brings such charisma and old-Hollywood …

A Halloween Reading List for Adults

A Halloween Reading List for Adults

[ad_1] Channeling the joy of the most childish holiday Annie Otzen / Getty October 28, 2023, 8 AM ET This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. “I believe in chasing the ghost of my former lighthearted self,” my colleague Faith Hill wrote last year. And “if there’s one day when I might almost catch up, it’s Halloween: the most ridiculous, inherently childish holiday, and perhaps the one grown-ups need most.” As we get older, experiences of pure, full-body fun and joy become more fleeting. Faith argues that adult Halloween is the perfect opportunity to get in touch with that kind of fun, and the freedom it can yield: “When everyone is wearing a dumb outfit and surrounded by tacky decorations, you all withhold judgment together. You might even remember, just for a second, who you were as a young child: unencumbered by pretensions and insecurities, present …

For Israel, Another New Layer of Trauma

For Israel, Another New Layer of Trauma

[ad_1] The attack on Israelis is a reminder of a long history of Jewish trauma. Kobi Wolf / Bloomberg / Getty October 8, 2023, 4:46 PM ET I will never forget that mild, golden early-October day almost exactly 50 years ago: the jarring sound of the sirens that tore into the otherworldly silence of Yom Kippur, the day of atonement; the ultra-Orthodox men, still wrapped in their snow-white High Holiday robes and fringed prayer shawls, riding on army jeeps that drove them to their volunteer positions in hospitals and military morgues—an inconceivable sight. But the most unsettling memory is of the famous speech that the prime minister, Golda Meir, delivered that evening on Israeli television, her voice trembling, her appearance bewildered. I was only 9, but I will never forget the fear in the eyes of the grown-ups. We were gathered around the clunky, old-fashioned TV set in my grandmother’s house in Jerusalem, and there was the distinct feeling that they were no longer in control of reality, that they themselves were like lost children. …

The Big Lie About Taiwan

The Big Lie About Taiwan

[ad_1] For some 50 years, American policy toward Taiwan has been based on the assertion that people on both sides of the Taiwan Straits believe that they are part of the same country and merely dispute who should run it and precisely how and when the island and the continent should be reunified. It is a falsehood so widely stated and so often repeated that officials sometimes forget that it is simply untrue. Indeed, they—and other members of the foreign-policy establishment—get anxious if you call it a lie. It may have been a necessary lie when the United States recognized the People’s Republic of China, although it is more likely that the United States got snookered by Chinese diplomats in the mid-1970s, when they needed us far more than we needed them. It may even be necessary now, but a lie it remains. Acknowledging this fact is not merely a matter of intellectual hygiene but an imperative if we are to prevent China from attempting to gobble up this island nation of 24 million, thereby …

The Surprisingly Mature Lessons of ‘Bluey’

The Surprisingly Mature Lessons of ‘Bluey’

[ad_1] Last week, I posed a question to my wife that could have been about any number of our friends: “Do you think Bandit and Chilli will have another baby?” She pondered this, then shook her head. “Probably not. They threw their crib out, remember?” Of course. My wife was referencing not a listing she’d seen on Facebook Marketplace but “Bedroom,” an episode from the third season of the Australian children’s show Bluey that she and I have each seen at least a dozen times. Our familiarity with Bluey is richer than with possibly any other show on the air, given that we both watch it over and over again with our 2-year-old daughter. But it wasn’t our shared knowledge that surprised me—it was that we were talking about a pair of cartoon dogs like they were people we knew. When you have a young child, you passively end up watching a lot of children’s television, and my screen-addicted self can’t help but pay some attention to how it delivers gentle life lessons or energetic …

Barbie Understands Mother-Daughter Relationships – The Atlantic

Barbie Understands Mother-Daughter Relationships – The Atlantic

[ad_1] When I was a little girl, I played with Barbie for the most basic reason you can imagine: She was so pretty. The cute outfits, the shiny blond hair, and all the fun she would have going around, looking like that. When I went to see the Barbie movie years later, as a grown woman, I had no doubt that the film was going to tackle the obvious issues related to how Barbie is seen: the impact that her sexualized body, created with the male gaze in mind, had on the generations of girls like me that she enthralled. But I was not prepared for how the movie would illuminate a different subject: the tension between mothers and daughters, and their often-frustrated need to see and feel seen by each other. As a child psychiatrist working in New York City, I deal with mother-daughter issues on a daily basis. I recognized many of my patients in Sasha, the movie’s tween-girl character, who is given the honor of enumerating Barbie’s flaws. Addressing Margot Robbie’s Barbie, …