All posts tagged: Glasgows

‘Yes, this is real’: LA recreates Glasgow’s Willy Wonka disaster – sad Oompa Loompa included | Los Angeles

‘Yes, this is real’: LA recreates Glasgow’s Willy Wonka disaster – sad Oompa Loompa included | Los Angeles

[ad_1] She was the sad Oompa Loompa seen around the world. Inside a bleak warehouse in Glasgow, a supposed celebration of Wonka’s delectable world of chocolate left children crying and parents calling the police. Attendees paid £35 to visit a bleak warehouse with a handful of props and posters; inside, they were treated to two jellybeans each and a few poorly costumed actors. Images of the event went extremely viral, making international news and inspiring a horror film and an hour-long documentary. Two months later, I found myself walking toward another grim-looking warehouse, this time in downtown Los Angeles. I was here for Willy’s Chocolate Experience LA, a tribute to the Glasgow disaster promising live entertainment, a red carpet-style photo op and a rare chance to meet the celebrity Oompa Loompa herself. An early description of the LA event, which had no official links with the Glasgow event, touted “an immersive journey” into a whimsical world featuring the Oompa Loompa, Kirsty Paterson, “maybe” in conversation with the comedian Nathan Fielder. Also included would be performances …

Wet weather but a warm welcome at Glasgow’s Refuweegee – a photo-essay | Charities

Wet weather but a warm welcome at Glasgow’s Refuweegee – a photo-essay | Charities

[ad_1] Refuweegee is a play on the words “refugee” and “weegie”, affectionate slang for a Glaswegian. The charity was founded in December 2015 by Selina Hales, a Glasgow native who wanted to welcome displaced people in the city after seeing news coverage of Syrians escaping war and persecution and crossing into Europe. Glasgow has the largest refugee population in the UK outside London. The scale and reach of charities such as Refuweegee have rapidly grown over the last few years, in part due to the rising numbers of asylum seekers but also because of the generosity and involvement of the local community. The charity has expanded to a network of more than 200 volunteers across Glasgow. Among other services, Refuweegee provides welcome packs to people newly arrived in the city. It has supplied more than 10,000 packs, which include essentials for Glasgow such as umbrellas and gloves as well as Scottish treats such as Irn-Bru and Tunnock’s tea cakes. It also makes up little backpacks for children that include books, games and toys. I wanted …

‘The privatisation of our local park’: calls to save Glasgow’s ‘second Hampden’ for the public | Glasgow

‘The privatisation of our local park’: calls to save Glasgow’s ‘second Hampden’ for the public | Glasgow

[ad_1] In Mount Florida, a south Glasgow neighbourhood, Scotland’s national football stadium, Hampden Park, looms large. But just half a mile north are the relics of another, with terraces and crush barriers surrounding a pitch that was once the heart of a 50,000-seat stadium known as “the second Hampden”. At one time home to local teams Queen’s Park and Third Lanark – as well as hosting Scottish Cup finals in the late 19th century – the pitch is now part of Cathkin Park, a council-maintained public space enjoyed by local families, community football teams and urban wildlife alike. Leased since 2022 by the Jimmy Johnstone Academy, a charity set up in memory of the late Celtic player, it is also the home ground of two youth teams. But a new barrier erected by the academy around the pitch is meeting opposition, with one local man attempting to challenge the city council in court over the legality of the fence, in a case believed to be one of the first of its kind in Scotland. Greg …

Nae Expectations: Andy Arnold on a gallus Dickens, Glasgow’s Tron and ‘catastrophic’ arts cuts | Theatre

[ad_1] Andy Arnold is a director with staying power. Nae Expectations, which has just opened at Glasgow’s Tron theatre, is his swansong production after nearly 16 years with the company. Prior to that, he spent 18 years at the Arches, the multi-arts venue he founded in the catacombs beneath the city’s Central station, creating a seedbed for a generation of theatremakers, artists and DJs. If in neither case did he overstay his welcome, it is because of the quality that defines him: his relentless championing of young artists. He has remained a vital part of Glasgow’s cultural life because of the company he keeps. Take two of the Tron’s biggest hits of recent years. Before it won an Olivier award, Pride and Prejudice* (*sort of) was a breezy summer hit at the 230-seat theatre. Arnold had programmed the irreverent Austen adaptation after effectively handing over the reins to the company led by playwright-actor Isobel McArthur and director Paul Brotherston. The company’s name? Blood of the Young – the clue was in the title. “We wouldn’t …