All posts tagged: fx

‘Shōgun’ Season 2: Everything We Know

‘Shōgun’ Season 2: Everything We Know

[ad_1] Spoilers for Shōgun season 1 ahead. Since the electrifying conclusion of FX’s hit limited series Shōgun, questions about a potential second season have lingered—and now intensified—with a new report that star and producer Hiroyuki Sanada has signed on to reprise his role as Lord Yoshii Toranaga. According to Deadline, Sanada has agreed to return to the show, in which his character battles to become a military dictator in 17th-century Japan. But sources tell the publication that “other elements are still being worked out and deals are being finalized” in an effort to extend Shōgun, which was only meant to last a single season. Making such a move would throw a compelling wrench into this year’s Emmys race, with the show potentially competing as a drama rather than a limited series. Vanity Fair has reached out to reps for FX for comment. Adapted from the 1975 James Clavell novel by co-creators Justin Marks and Rachel Kondo, Shōgun has been a runaway hit since its February debut. “Ultimately, the audience gets to decide whether it’s something …

‘Shogun’ Star Hiroyuki Sanada Reveals Finale’s Deeper Message

‘Shogun’ Star Hiroyuki Sanada Reveals Finale’s Deeper Message

[ad_1] [This story contains major spoilers from the season finale of FX’s Shōgun.] It’s easy to picture Japanese actor Hiroyuki Sanada gazing toward the horizon with a beatific sense of satisfaction over everything he has achieved with FX’s smash-hit miniseries Shōgun. His character, Lord Yoshii Toranaga, enjoys several such moments in the show’s 10th and last episode, A Dream of a Dream, as his patient, masterful strategizing finally yields precisely the outcome he desires: absolute power for himself and peace for all of Japan.  Sanada’s moment of career triumph is not dissimilar in its decade-spanning tirelessness (at least, in entertainment industry terms). He began performing nearly 60 years ago as a child in Japan, apprenticing under the legendary actor Sonny Chiba on the way to becoming a major local star, before breaking into Hollywood with roles in projects like The Last Samurai, Lost, The Wolverine, Avengers: Endgame, Bullet Train, John Wick: Chapter 4 and many others. But now, he is the star of what many analysts believe to be Disney‘s most-watched streaming series to date, a show …

Cosmo Jarvis Goes Deep on the ‘Shōgun’ Finale and Blackthorne’s Ending

Cosmo Jarvis Goes Deep on the ‘Shōgun’ Finale and Blackthorne’s Ending

[ad_1] The finale opens with him having these visions of a future filled with regret, looking back. You’re in very elaborate old-age makeup. How were these sequences presented to you? Well, the makeup was astounding. Six hours, seven hours, something like that—it took a very long time. I looked like my grandfather. It’s difficult for me to talk about, because not all of that scene made it into the cut. There were parts of that scene that were not included in the final episode. Some of those omissions nailed down the nature of Blackthorne’s character and motivations, as I’ve previously described—they nailed down the extent of them, but it was a difficult scene to play. It’s so theoretical that the purpose of that is to depict the man as he was, succeeding in the way he initially hoped to succeed, and the ramifications of that on his soul. Was that level of physical transformation new to you? Oh, yes, it was. I mean, they got rid of most of the scene, but to play an …

Inside Mariko’s Jaw-Dropping ‘Shōgun’ Decision: “It’s What She Wants”

Inside Mariko’s Jaw-Dropping ‘Shōgun’ Decision: “It’s What She Wants”

[ad_1] This article contains spoilers about the ninth episode of Shōgun, “Crimson Sky.” When Anna Sawai first read the script for the ninth episode of Shōgun, “Crimson Sky,” she didn’t feel especially emotional. “I already knew the story, so it was more like, ‘Okay, how are we going to shoot this?’” she recalls. “I was just distancing myself and thinking about the technical stuff. That’s how I had to do it, because otherwise I would have to carry those emotions for way too long.” Indeed, for the actor behind Shōgun’s tragic hero, Lady Mariko, everything came to a head only when cameras started rolling. Even more than a year after wrapping the series, the emotions didn’t fall away: “I’d remember how I felt playing certain scenes, and I would just cry.” Mariko dies at the end of “Crimson Sky” in an act of ultimate sacrifice. She puts herself on the front lines in Osaka, as part of her Lord Toranaga’s grand plan to seize power and expose the deception of his rival, Ishido (Takehiro Hira). …

With ‘Shogun,’ Hollywood Icon Hiroyuki Sanada Takes On the Project of a Lifetime

With ‘Shogun,’ Hollywood Icon Hiroyuki Sanada Takes On the Project of a Lifetime

[ad_1] There’s surely no precedent for the career of Hiroyuki Sanada, which spans more than a dozen big-screen blockbusters and TV series including Westworld and Lost—all of which came after more than three decades of work in his native Japan. But this moment still feels seismic. For the first time in his nearly 60 years of acting, the Last Samurai breakout and John Wick: Chapter 4 scene-stealer topped the call sheet of a Hollywood production on FX’s Shōgun, the epic new adaptation of James Clavell’s landmark 1975 novel. (The first two episodes are now streaming on Hulu.) He received his first-ever producer credit on the show, painstakingly poring over every detail of the production’s lavish, nuanced portrait of feudal Japan. And he found himself giving a performance unlike any he’d given before. For fans of Sanada, most familiar for wielding swords opposite and dispensing wisdom to some of the town’s biggest stars, this marks a thrilling step forward. As the actor candidly reveals in our wide-ranging conversation, the roles available to a Japanese actor in …

FX Chief Explains What Triggered the End of Peak TV

FX Chief Explains What Triggered the End of Peak TV

[ad_1] FX CEO John Landgraf, fresh off revealing a 14 percent decline in the volume of scripted originals and saying “adios” to Peak TV, can pinpoint the moment the bubble burst. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, the always insightful 20-year FX executive also maps out a vision of the future as he does his best to forecast what will stop the TV industry’s contraction that prompted the number of U.S.-produced scripted series to decline more in the past year than the decade prior. You mentioned at TCA that the contraction started well before last year’s dual strikes. What do you think the turning point was? Landgraf: The inflection point was when Netflix decided to change their public-facing Wall Street metric from global subscribers and ARPU [average revenue per user] to profit. I think they did that because they were ahead of everyone else and it was to their advantage to choose a metric in which they had the lead. And it not only benefited them, but all the other companies that were further …

John Landgraf Declines to Crown Netflix Winner of the Streaming Wars

John Landgraf Declines to Crown Netflix Winner of the Streaming Wars

[ad_1] FX CEO John Landgraf celebrated his 20th year at the now Disney-owned network Friday at the Television Critics Association’s winter press tour by saying “adios” to Peak TV. The executive, who famously coined the phrase back in 2015 to represent the content boom, announced that U.S. scripted originals tumbled 14 percent year-over-year (from 600 to 512) in 2023 and the industry has now entered its “Peaked TV” era. “I was finally correct,” he quipped after two previously incorrect estimates for when the Peak TV era would officially conclude. He said that last year’s dual Hollywood strikes “undoubtedly played a role,” but the decline in the volume of scripted series was “likely under way” before labor actions by writers and actors brought production to a standstill. Calling the change a “realignment” for the industry, Landgraf seems to have learned from his previous Peak TV predictions and did not offer an estimate of when he thinks the content contraction would level out. “I can forecast that in 2024, we will see more year-on-year declines between this …

Scripted Originals Fall 14 Percent in 2023

Scripted Originals Fall 14 Percent in 2023

[ad_1] The Peak TV era is officially over. FX CEO John Landgraf, the so-called “Mayor of Television” who coined the term “Peak TV” in 2015, released his network’s annual research on the volume of U.S.-produced scripted original series for 2023, and the numbers are in line with what the industry had anticipated. The total number of broadcast, cable and streaming shows (made for adults) clocked in at 516, down a whopping 14 percent from the 600 comedies and dramas produced in 2022. The 14 percent decline is the largest decrease since FX began tallying originals. The 516 shows are the lowest since 493 in 2020 when the pandemic halted productions for months and forced media companies to re-evaluate their financials. The decline in the total volume of originals comes as no surprise as media companies canceled a wave of shows, some as a result of production delays caused by the dual strikes and others because they wouldn’t be ready until much later than previously expected, creating a marketing logjam and limiting the funds networks and …

Elisabeth Moss Turns Super Spy in ‘The Veil’—Part Espionage Thriller, Part ‘Thelma & Louise’

Elisabeth Moss Turns Super Spy in ‘The Veil’—Part Espionage Thriller, Part ‘Thelma & Louise’

[ad_1] The Veil almost didn’t come Moss’s way. Knight started writing after power producer Denise Di Novi (Edward Scissorhands, Little Women) floated a kernel of a premise to him: exploring the friction between intelligence agencies of different nations. Some exhaustive research later, and Knight had a vibrant, witty spy thriller centered on two mysterious women. “I gave Steve maybe a four-line idea, and then he came back to me with all of these relationships—it was wild to me,” Di Novi says. She wanted Moss from the get-go, but everyone involved told her, “Do not waste time, we want to get this going right away, she gets offered everything.” Undeterred, Di Novi reached the actor eventually—and Moss, looking for a project to take on during her Handmaid’s Tale hiatus, said yes swiftly after reading the script. Moss shakes her head over Zoom as she listens to Di Novi recount the difficulty to simply make an offer. “The idea that it may not have come my way because somebody said that I may not want to do …

No Plans for Season 4

No Plans for Season 4

[ad_1] It sounds more like “Bye, I’m Dave,” at least for now. Dave Burd — Lil Dicky, if you prefer — is taking a step back from his FX comedy after three seasons. It’s not a cancellation, those close to the show are quick to point out, but there are no plans for a return of Dave any time soon. “After some back and forth, there are no current plans for a fourth season of Dave right now, as Dave Burd has decided to take an extended break to focus on music and other ventures,” reads a statement from FX, which both aired the series on FXX and Hulu and produced it under the FX Productions shingle. “That does not rule out the possibility of doing something in the future. We love the show and sincerely appreciate the creative excellence Dave, Jeff Schaffer, the cast and crew delivered with every episode. We are excited that our partnership with Dave will continue as he develops future projects for us through his overall production deal with FXP.” It’s …