All posts tagged: financial mismanagement

Nottingham council leader hits back at Sunak for ‘wasting public money’

Nottingham council leader hits back at Sunak for ‘wasting public money’

[ad_1] The leader of Nottingham City Council has hit back after the Prime Minister suggested the authority has “let down” its residents through financial mismanagement. Councillor David Mellen said that the Government was “in a league of its own” when it came to “wasting public money, mismanagement and poor decision-making”, and said Rishi Sunak had “yet to put himself before the public” in a general election. His comments came after Mr Sunak said on Thursday that the city council, which is Labour-led, had “let down its residents” after issuing a section 114 notice in November last year, meaning it cannot deliver a balanced budget. Speaking at a youth centre in Mansfield, Mr Sunak said the council had made a “series of poor decisions”, including the failed Robin Hood Energy scheme, which he claimed illustrated how Labour would manage the economy if they came to power. Responding to Mr Sunak’s comments, Mr Mellen said: “The people of Nottingham put their faith in the Labour-run council by electing 51 Labour councillors out of 55 in last year’s …

The Spiky, Unsentimental Visions of Diana Athill

The Spiky, Unsentimental Visions of Diana Athill

[ad_1] One of American fiction’s core preoccupations, these days, seems to be the question of what causes unhappiness. Many of our major writers are earnest anatomists of discontent and its social, psychological, and existential causes. This kind of fiction can be very powerful. Reading about loneliness when you’re lonely can provide both diagnosis and solace; encountering a character trapped by student debt or patriarchal expectation can inspire a sense of camaraderie in a reader facing similar frustrations. But more often than not, contemporary novelists handle their subject matter with immersive seriousness and sincerity—and sincerity, after a while, gets tiring. Misery may love company, but sometimes a miserable person wants cheering up too. If you’re looking to make a little light of sadness, as I have been, the work of Diana Athill might be the perfect place to turn. The legendary writer and editor is one of a loose cadre of 20th-century English and Irish women authors gaining resurgent attention for their brilliantly drawn characters and sharply witty prose; others in this camp include Penelope Fitzgerald, …