All posts tagged: Farmer

British farmer finds Rolex watch decades after he thought a cow ate it

British farmer finds Rolex watch decades after he thought a cow ate it

[ad_1] James Steele had saved up all the extra money he made from milk deliveries in his early 20s to buy a silver Air-King Rolex around 1950. He’d paid about 100 British pounds for the white-faced watch and proudly wore it, whether sporting dress clothes or riding a tractor on his family’s dairy farm about 150 miles northwest of London. But one day in the 1970s, Steele was bringing in his cows for milking when the Rolex broke off his wrist and fell into a grassy pasture. He searched for it for days but eventually gave up, figuring the watch had ended up in a cow’s stomach. Confident he would never see it again, Steele bought a few replacements over the following decades. Now 95, Steele has been reunited with his long-lost Rolex after a metal-detector enthusiast recently found it on the family’s land in Shropshire, England. “I’d written it off,” Steele said, adding that he recognized the Rolex immediately, even after five decades. “I never thought I’d see it again, but I was over …

Farmer Annie and her prize-winning sheep: Joanne Coates’ best photograph | Art and design

Farmer Annie and her prize-winning sheep: Joanne Coates’ best photograph | Art and design

[ad_1] I moved back home to rural North Yorkshire in 2016, where I met my partner, a farmer. When you spend a lot of time on a farm, you end up helping out. I’m not from a farming background so I joined a Facebook group for women in farming to feel a bit more supported. You can ask about practical things – no question is a stupid one. I was photographing working-class women in agriculture when I started a residency with the Maltings in Berwick for my series Daughters of the Soil. I put out a call in that Facebook group asking if any women there would be up for being involved. Only five responded but there was a snowball effect: each one directed me to someone else. After the residency, I continued the series, and that’s when I got talking to Annie Stones. She was posting a lot in the group and always helping other women. She is the chairwoman of the Young Farmers Club in Reeth. I realised she lived about 15 minutes …

I’m a British farmer. Here’s the scary truth about what’s happening to our crops | Guy Singh-Watson

I’m a British farmer. Here’s the scary truth about what’s happening to our crops | Guy Singh-Watson

[ad_1] Farming has always been a risky business. To the chaos of Brexit and the relentless squeezing of the supermarkets, we can add the rapidly escalating threats associated with climate change. In most industries, at the point where risk is judged to outweigh the potential commercial reward, both capital and people tend to make a swift exit, following economist Adam Smith’s “invisible hand” of self-interest. The problem with farming is that most farmers are emotionally invested in their work. An exit is seldom considered – perhaps we should be more like the bankers, but they wouldn’t be much good at growing potatoes. Around the world, farming practice evolves in response to past success. Over 30 years, I’ve recorded planting and harvest dates, temperatures and yields, using data to guide my decisions, just like generations of farmers before me. But over the past decade, as the pace of change in weather patterns has accelerated, the value of that accumulated experience has become increasingly irrelevant. For most farmers, this last year has been about grabbing rare, good …

Farmer confidence at lowest in England and Wales since survey began, NFU says | Food & drink industry

Farmer confidence at lowest in England and Wales since survey began, NFU says | Food & drink industry

[ad_1] Farmers’ confidence has hit its lowest level in at least 14 years, a long-running survey by the biggest farming union in Britain has found, with extreme weather and the post-Brexit phasing-out of EU subsidies blamed for the drop. The National Farmers’ Union warned there had been a “collapse of confidence” and that the outlook was at its lowest since the annual poll of its members in England and Wales began in 2010. Most farms are expecting to reduce food production next year, with arable farming particularly badly hit. Tom Bradshaw, the NFU’s president, pointed to extreme wet weather and the phasing-out of EU basic payment scheme (BPS) subsidies as key reasons for the downturn. “Our concern today is that if members don’t have confidence, then we as a country can’t deliver food security,” said Bradshaw. The annual survey of almost 800 farmers asks respondents to rate the prospects of their business, with the four responses all given weighted scores – very negative (-1), negative (-0.5), positive (0.5) and very positive (1). These are added …

US Airstrike Targeting Al-Qaida Leader in Syria Killed a Farmer, American Military Says

US Airstrike Targeting Al-Qaida Leader in Syria Killed a Farmer, American Military Says

[ad_1] WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. airstrike in Syria in May 2023 that was targeting an al-Qaida leader killed an innocent civilian instead, U.S. Central Command said Thursday, confirming early reports from residents and family members shortly after the attack. U.S. Central Command said an investigation into the May 3 strike concluded that U.S. forces misidentified the intended al-Qaida target “and that a civilian, Mr. Lufti Hasan Masto, was struck and killed.” Shortly after the drone strike, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, an opposition war monitor, said it had hit a chicken farm near the town of Harem, killing one person. And just days later, relatives and neighbors told The Associated Press that the person killed was a farmer who raised sheep, chickens and cattle and had no involvement with armed groups. Masto’s brother, Mohamed Masto, said reports that his brother, 60, was involved with al-Qaida were “absolute lies” and his killing was “an injustice and an aggression.” Instead, Masto was simply tending his sheep when the strike hit. Central Command said the investigation …

“Vegetable-forward”: How chef and farmer Emma Hearst makes produce the center of her plate

“Vegetable-forward”: How chef and farmer Emma Hearst makes produce the center of her plate

[ad_1] Emma Hearst has held many titles — James Beard-nominated chef, former restaurateur, farmer, cookbook author, youngest-ever “Icon Chef” competitor, store owner, wife and mother — but to me, she is best known as the former co-owner and chef of Sorella, an New York City restaurant (and subsequent cookbook) that was formative in my culinary “adolescence,” if you will. Hearst, whose vibrant new cookbook “Flavors from the Farm: Vegetable-Forward Food to Share“ is out now, has settled on a 60-acre farmstead upstate. The book follows that sentiment, with produce-focused, elevated dishes that are simple to prepare but bodacious in flavor and color, all made with with the humblest of ingredients. Of course, placing a focus on gardening and produce is beneficial for many reasons, from sustainability and health to animal rights and economic issues. In addition, gardening can also be something of a fun hobby for some — or perhaps even a vested passion, too. Furthermore, many folks are feeling the impact of food inflation, so being able to build a meal from your own garden is …

Farmer arrested as man shot dead and another injured after ‘burglary’ | UK | News

Farmer arrested as man shot dead and another injured after ‘burglary’ | UK | News

[ad_1] A farmer has been arrested on suspicion of murder and attempted murder after a man was shot dead and another seriously injured following a “burglary” in a quiet rural village. Police were called following reports of a break-in at a remote farmhouse in Whaley Bridge in the Peak District, in the early hours of the morning on Wednesday. A man was found with fatal injuries while another man was found seriously wounded on the road near to the property. Officers say both men sustained gun shot wounds. A cordon around Eccles Road was put up by officers from Derbyshire Constabulary. The injured man was taken to hospital where police say he was arrested on suspicion of aggravated burglary. Another man was later arrested on suspicion of the same offence when police stopped a car on the A6 near to Chapel-en-le-frith, in Derbyshire. Two cordons remain in place at two houses in Eccles Road and, police say, will remain in place for some time while investigations continue. Eccles Road is currently closed from the junction …

Farmers like me would go out of business under Welsh Labour | UK | News

Farmers like me would go out of business under Welsh Labour | UK | News

[ad_1] Roughly 3% of England’s agricultural holdings (3,145) and 2% of England’s total farmed area (223,000 hectares) are in Sussex. Will, 42, who grew up on the family farm, works approximately 1,500 acres of them – divided between predominantly arable under a mix of owned, rented and shared farming agreements. He also has a small beef herd. He said: “Food security is one of the most important priorities facing the UK and it is madness for a policy to insist on taking productive land away from this aim.” The farmer now fears for the security of his business if eco schemes are forced through at the expense of his ability to produce crops. READ MORE: ‘Our farm is set to lose £300,000 in first-ever year without harvest’ His criticism chimes with thousands of Welsh farmers who protested outside the Senedd last month, with thousands of wellies placed on the steps of the Parliament building in Cardiff. It also comes after a Welsh government report warned its controversial Sustainable Farming Scheme could see £200million lost from …

The Rise of the Carbon Farmer

The Rise of the Carbon Farmer

[ad_1] Patrick Holden strolls across the field, pausing from time to time to bend and point out a bumblebee, or a white butterfly, or a dung beetle. A wide expanse of blue sky stretches above. Beneath, undulating green hills, sprawling hedgerows, a horizon broken only by the jagged tips of Wales’ Cambrian mountain range. Sun-soaked goodness. “Can you see that bumblebee working the clover?” he asks, voice breathy with exertion. “The bird life, insects, butterflies, small mammals, and bats … the biodiversity of this place is unbelievable.” This is all here, he says, because he’s farming in harmony with nature. The secret to this small oasis, Holden says, is the way he works his land. He is one of a growing number of farmers shaking off conventional methods and harnessing practices to rebuild soil health and fertility—cover crops, minimal tilling, managed grazing, diverse crop rotations. It is a reverse revolution in some ways, taking farming back to what it once was, when yield was not king, industrialization not the norm, and small farms dabbled in …

J Doyne Farmer: The man reinventing economics with chaos theory and complexity science

J Doyne Farmer: The man reinventing economics with chaos theory and complexity science

[ad_1] IN 2006, economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York started to worry about the overheating US housing market. Concerned that the bubble might burst, they used their best model to predict what would happen if house prices dropped by 20 per cent. Not much, was the answer it churned out. Soon after, house prices fell by almost exactly this amount, leading to probably the worst period of global economic decline in a century. Economics is often lambasted for being a pseudoscience, with dense mathematical formulae that belie its subjectivity and a poor track record of making accurate predictions. J. Doyne Farmer thinks we can do better. In his new book, Making Sense of Chaos, he unpicks why standard economic approaches often fail – and presents a radical alternative. Complexity economics, as it is called, treats economies as systems akin to natural ecosystems or Earth’s climate. Giant computer simulations based on these ideas offer a better representation of how billions of people interact within the global economy. Farmer currently holds posts at the …