All posts tagged: Europes

Populist, nativist, neofascist? A lexicon of Europe’s far right | The far right

Populist, nativist, neofascist? A lexicon of Europe’s far right | The far right

[ad_1] They are known, variously, as far right, national-conservative, radical right, anti-Islam, nativist, and Eurosceptic. Also as extreme right, populist, “alt-right”, neofascist, anti-immigration, nationalist, authoritarian, and assorted combinations of the above. As the dust settles on the results of this month’s European parliamentary elections, it is worth examining what some of the terms routinely used to describe Europe’s wide array of far-right parties mean – and whether they are always the right ones. For this brief lexicon, the Guardian has drawn on the definitions of The PopuList, a groundbreaking project involving more than 100 political scientists from 30-plus countries that classifies Europe’s political parties and their changing ideologies. A campaign rally for Spain’s far-right Vox party leader, Santiago Abascal, on the outskirts of Madrid on 7 June 2024. Photograph: Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images Radical right Based on the work of Cas Mudde, an expert on populism and the far right at the University of Georgia, radical right parties are defined as those that espouse two core ideologies: nativism (seen as the most significant), and authoritarianism. Nativism …

Paris can wait: how we dodged the summer crowds by Interrailing to Europe’s smaller towns | Europe holidays

Paris can wait: how we dodged the summer crowds by Interrailing to Europe’s smaller towns | Europe holidays

[ad_1] We were sitting enjoying a quiet beer at a bar in Ghent when I realised we’d made the right decision. Ghent was humming but not heaving, cheerful but not chaotic. It was the first night of our three-week Interrail trip with our 18- and 16-year-old sons. Now, after a long train journey, the calm ambience of the medieval Belgian city left us feeling relaxed rather than exhausted. An Interrail ticket opens up 33 European countries by rail and many people seize the opportunity to visit capital cities on their bucket list. A typical itinerary takes in big hitters like Paris, Prague, Rome and Madrid. We decided to do things a little differently. Our 22-day continuous Interrail pass meant no extra travel costs and we were determined to make the most of it Our ultimate destination was Budapest, but our route there and back took in smaller, less frenetic towns and cities. We opted for Delft and Utrecht rather than Amsterdam, Baden-Baden in Germany’s Black Forest instead of Berlin, Salzburg over Vienna and Lausanne, not …

Beaten and tortured: the north African children paying a bloody price for Europe’s insatiable appetite for cocaine | Global development

Beaten and tortured: the north African children paying a bloody price for Europe’s insatiable appetite for cocaine | Global development

[ad_1] Image of a boy made out of ‘cocaine’ Illustration: Carl Godfrey/The Guardian Maddalena Chiarenza never quite knows what state the children will be in when they arrive at her door. She has seen terrible injuries. Black eyes, missing teeth. A broken jaw. “They suffer such regular violence,” says Chiarenza, whose Brussels-based NGO, SOS Jeune, cares for unaccompanied Moroccan and Algerian children. A short walk from the NGO’s office near the Eurostar terminal, ragged groups of north African children are a common sight. Some walk through the streets like zombies, after being fed Rivotril, a potent benzodiazepine. Chiarenza says that other than a handful of NGOs such as SOS Jeune, these children have few friends. Nobody wants to take responsibility for their care. Number 332 Some of the children the NGO has cared for have since died; through sickness, murder or suicide; Chiarenza says at least five in the past three years. Another 23 children it has had contact with are in prison, some on drug offences. On the surface, the plight of these unaccompanied …

The AfD’s obsession with the Third Reich is driving a realignment of Europe’s far right | Mariam Lau

The AfD’s obsession with the Third Reich is driving a realignment of Europe’s far right | Mariam Lau

[ad_1] Momentous change is afoot within Europe’s far right. Just as voters across 27 countries prepare to go to the polls in EU elections, a split over the German far right’s allegiance to the Third Reich is driving a realignment. The far-right Identity and Democracy (ID) group in the European parliament last week expelled the entire Alternative for Germany (AfD) faction from its ranks after a furore involving the leading AfD candidate Maximilian Krah. The unprecedented move, initiated by Marine Le Pen, was officially a reaction to remarks Krah made in an interview with an Italian newspaper. Asked if his demand that all Germans take pride in their forbears would include those who were in the SS, the Nazi’s main paramilitary force, Krah said that “not all SS were criminals”. The cordon sanitaire Le Pen called for around the AfD as a result represents a real rift in Europe’s far right camp: between those who affirm, either tacitly or explicitly, a connection to the Third Reich or to fascism, and those who do not; between …

Europe’s regional inequalities fuel anger and despair

Europe’s regional inequalities fuel anger and despair

[ad_1] Angelos Vavlekis, a civil engineer who has started an agricultural project near Katapola, on the island of Amorgos, Greece, walks through the land he farms, on April 4, 2024. LOULOU D’AKI FOR LE MONDE “In Calabria, we’re short of everything, we’re far from everything,” said Teresa Rossi, 58, with a hint of bitterness that reflected her daily hardships. On a rainy April morning, she had trudged through the streets of Cosenza’s deserted city center to get help from the diocese’s Caritas, the Italian Catholic social aid organization. Rossi is one of 240,000 Calabrians who no longer receive the ‘citizens’ income,’ a benefit that Giorgia Meloni’s government abolished in 2023. Having lost her part-time job as a care assistant to the elderly, she can no longer afford to pay her bills, while still providing a home for three of her adult children. They are barely scraping by between unemployment and undeclared day labor, two of the many ills afflicting young Calabrian people. Read more Subscribers only Italy’s Giorgia Meloni chooses International Workers’ Day to cut …

China’s Xi wades into Europe’s divides, in France, Serbia, Hungary

China’s Xi wades into Europe’s divides, in France, Serbia, Hungary

[ad_1] You’re reading an excerpt from the Today’s WorldView newsletter. Sign up to get the rest free, including news from around the globe and interesting ideas and opinions to know, sent to your inbox on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The showpiece stop in Chinese President Xi Jinping’s three-nation tour of Europe was France. From Paris to the Pyrenees, Xi and French President Emmanuel Macron engaged in a mutual charm offensive. Xi was on his first visit to Europe in half a decade, and eager to show the Chinese public that China is a major respected power on the world stage at a time of geopolitical confrontation abroad and relative economic stagnation at home. Macron, who reiterated before Xi’s trip the importance of France not being a mere “vassal” to the United States, found in the moment a demonstration of his nation’s potential ability to guide Europe’s “strategic autonomy.” [ad_2] Source link

Simplifying public funding for Europe’s battery SMEs

Simplifying public funding for Europe’s battery SMEs

[ad_1] Thore Sekkenes, European Battery Alliance Program Director at EIT InnoEnergy, highlights the importance of EIT InnoEnergy’s One-Stop-Shop for providing guidance to SMEs about efficient access to public funding. In Europe’s energy transition, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are emerging as catalysts for innovation within the battery industry. With their capacity for rapid adaptation, SMEs can drive significant advancements in battery technology. However, despite their potential, accessing funding and navigating Europe’s complex financial landscape must be overcome. Services like EIT InnoEnergy’s One-Stop-Shop to EU finance play a pivotal role in addressing these challenges. This service offers tailored guidance to simplify access to public funding across the battery value chain so that SMEs can reach their full potential in the energy sector. To learn more about the potential of the One-Stop-Shop service, we spoke to Thore Sekkenes, European Battery Alliance Program Director at EIT InnoEnergy. Can you elaborate on the important role of battery SMEs in Europe’s wider energy transition? When it comes to implementing changes, smaller companies tend to be quicker compared to larger ones. …

Ursula von der Leyen is now a household name – and that could be Europe’s salvation | Catherine De Vries and Isabell Hoffmann

Ursula von der Leyen is now a household name – and that could be Europe’s salvation | Catherine De Vries and Isabell Hoffmann

[ad_1] As 400 million EU citizens prepare to cast their votes in June’s European elections, a new poll shows that it is Ursula von der Leyen who has caught voters’ attention like no EU chief before her. Our survey suggests that a large majority of Europeans today are aware that she is the European Commission president, considered to be the most powerful political office in the EU. Previous EU chief executives have been largely unknown to the public. But almost 75% are able to correctly identify von der Leyen’s name and recognise her face. Five years ago, her predecessor, Jean-Claude Juncker, scored only 40% recognition. Pressure for EU reform is becoming urgent. With war raging in Ukraine and Gaza, and the relationship between China and the US cooling, the EU needs deeper defence integration to meet the growing geopolitical challenges. Economic and monetary union might not be sustainable without closer fiscal integration and a stronger single market. New technologies need to be harnessed to generate prosperity for the next generation and the the 27-nation EU …

‘Double punishment’: the racial discrimination in Europe’s rental housing market | Race

‘Double punishment’: the racial discrimination in Europe’s rental housing market | Race

[ad_1] The 40 sq metre apartment had everything that Hamado Dipama was looking for: one bedroom, a bath and a good location in the southern German city of Augsburg. When he called to set up a viewing, however, the landlord kept asking him where he was from. “It was really bizarre,” said Dipama. “I told him that I didn’t know what that had to do with his rental. And he hung up on me.” Dipama, originally from Burkina Faso, swiftly realised he had overlooked a stipulation listed plainly in the 2019 newspaper advert: “Germans only.” It was a window – albeit far more overt than usual – into the kind of discrimination that racialised minorities across Europe have long faced in the housing market. In recent years, as cities across the continent grapple with a shortage of decent, affordable housing, campaigners warn that the housing crisis is having a disproportionate effect on people of colour and other minorities. For these communities, “it’s a dual crisis”, said Magda Boulabiza, of the European Network Against Racism. “Discrimination …

Europe’s election campaigns are under the constant threat of foreign interference

Europe’s election campaigns are under the constant threat of foreign interference

[ad_1] François-Xavier Bellamy, the top candidate for the conservative Les Républicains party in the upcoming European elections, revealed Monday that he had been targeted by an attempted cyberattack launched by a group believed to be linked to the Chinese government. Coming soon after Socialist Party candidate Raphaël Glucksmann’s announcement that he was targeted by what seemed to be a mass disinformation campaign on social media, Bellamy’s declaration is a stark reminder of the threat of foreign interference that continues to plague parties competing in the June elections. Issued on: 07/05/2024 – 17:36 5 min Bellamy announced on Monday that he had filed a complaint after he was targeted by a cyberattack attempt from a group of hackers called APT31, which several countries – including the US and the UK – believe to be linked to the Chinese government. “At a time when Chinese President Xi Jinping is embarking on a state visit to Paris, there’s a feeling that we haven’t taken the measure of what’s at stake today in terms of foreign interference,” Bellamy told …