All posts tagged: edition of The Atlantic Daily

What Nikki Haley is trying to prove

What Nikki Haley is trying to prove

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. Nikki Haley faces terrible odds in her home state of South Carolina and beyond, but she has vowed to keep going. Beyond her own political ambitions, her campaign may be about trying to send a message to the Republican Party. First, here are four new stories from The Atlantic: Existential, Financial, Practical Say what you want about Nikki Haley, but she is sticking with it. She continues to trail significantly behind Donald Trump in the polls, even in her home state of South Carolina, despite raising money from donors at a steady pace. Yet Haley has vowed to stay in the Republican primary at least through early March. Why is she still here? Many have speculated in recent months that Haley is angling for a different higher office, perhaps that of the vice president. She has said that she …

Nine stories to read today

Nine stories to read today

Plus: Many presidents wrote books. Were any of them any good? J.S. Johnston / Library of Congress / Corbis / VCG / Getty February 19, 2024, 11:32 AM ET This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. Spend time with nine great recent stories, selected by our editors. Then explore some presidential history from the Atlantic archives. Your Reading List Illustration by Ben Hickey Polyamory, the Ruling Class’s Latest Fad By Tyler Austin Harper Americans who most reap the benefits of marriage are the same class who get to declare monogamy passé and boring. Read the article. Illustration by Aleia Murawski and Sam Copeland Why Parents Struggle So Much in the World’s Richest Country By Stephanie H. Murray Raising kids shouldn’t be this hard. Read the article. Illustration by James Hosking. Sources: Erica Lansner / Redux; Eric Cox / Reuters; Fine Art Images / Getty; JDC Archives; …

One of TV’s best slow-burn couples

One of TV’s best slow-burn couples

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. Welcome back to The Daily’s Sunday culture edition, in which one Atlantic writer or editor reveals what’s keeping them entertained. Today’s special guest is Karen Ostergren, a deputy copy chief who has worked at The Atlantic for more than a decade. Karen is an avid runner who enjoys listening to other people talk about running—Ali Feller’s podcast is her favorite—and who recently visited an exhibit in New York about the sport’s history. On the other end of her content consumption spectrum, she likes tuning in to Abbott Elementary, escaping into the lush world of fantasy and romance novels, and watching football (and keeping up with the latest Jason Kelce memes). First, here are three Sunday reads from The Atlantic: The Culture Survey: Karen Ostergren My favorite way of wasting time on my phone: When Elon Musk bought Twitter—even before …

Don’t panic about Russian space weapons

Don’t panic about Russian space weapons

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. A brief hubbub erupted in Washington this week over an unspecified “national security threat” that some sources now believe is related to a Russian plan to use nuclear weapons in space. The prospect is cause for concern but not panic. First, here are four new stories from The Atlantic: For All Mankind Yesterday, Representative Mike Turner, the chair of the House Intelligence Committee, issued a cryptic request to President Joe Biden, asking him to declassify information regarding a “serious national security threat.” Turner’s statement angered some of the more extreme members of his own GOP caucus. Representative Andy Ogles claimed that Turner was just trying to whip up some fear about Russia, in part to help passage of a bill authorizing more aid to Ukraine, and he has asked Speaker Mike Johnson to begin an investigation into Turner’s public …

Trump’s contempt for military service

Trump’s contempt for military service

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. The presumptive Republican nominee showed yet again this weekend how little he thinks of America’s men and women in uniform. First, here are four new stories from The Atlantic: A Pattern of Disdain Donald Trump made news over the weekend by saying that he would invite Russian aggression against NATO members. I wrote on Saturday that these statements were far more dangerous than his usual disconnected blustering. But in the midst of this appalling business, Trump also reminded Americans how little he values the service of American military personnel. At a campaign stop in Conway, South Carolina, on Saturday, Trump tried to zing his only remaining GOP primary rival, his own United Nations ambassador (and a former Palmetto State governor) Nikki Haley, by asking why her husband was not on the campaign trail with her. Army Major Michael Haley, …

What was that Super Bowl ad even selling?

What was that Super Bowl ad even selling?

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. Celebrities were all over last night’s Super Bowl ads. Did the stars overpower the brands they were supposed to be selling? First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: Promoting the Promoters Many of last night’s Super Bowl ad breaks seemed to double as promotions for celebrities. An ad that focused on how Christopher Walken talks was immediately followed by an ad about how Arnold Schwarzenegger talks, but the products being hawked (in Walken’s case, BMW, and in Schwarzenegger’s case, State Farm) were almost incidental. And Beyoncé, of course, appeared in an ad for Verizon that was effectively a plug for her upcoming album. The share of big-game commercials featuring celebrities has gone up dramatically over the past decade. Celebrity cameos tend to be a safe bet with viewers, and advertisers seemed especially cautious this year. The Super …