All posts tagged: Conor Friedersdorf

The long odds of this year’s Super Bowl location

The long odds of this year’s Super Bowl location

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. For years, the NFL balked at even a whiff of gambling—and kept Las Vegas at a distance as a result. But as the league has become more open to gambling, it has also embraced the city synonymous with it. First, here are four new stories from The Atlantic: In the Shadow of the Strip People are betting on just about anything these days. But something few would have bet on even a decade ago? That the Super Bowl would be held in Las Vegas. The NFL’s decision to hold the game in the city is an about-face for a league that, for decades, shunned even the faintest association with gambling. The league, and especially its influential longtime commissioner Pete Rozelle, was fixated on the risks of compromising the league’s integrity and reputation. “No one does, or could, dispute the …

Readers share the state of their local journalism

Readers share the state of their local journalism

“It is painful to watch as our once-proud newspaper has become a shell nearly devoid of meaningful content,” one reader says. Homer Sykes / Alamy January 31, 2024, 6:05 PM ET Welcome to Up for Debate. Each week, Conor Friedersdorf rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week, I asked readers, “What is the state of local journalism where you live, and how does it affect your community?” Replies have been edited for length and clarity. Ralph, who didn’t say where he lived, shared a concern that I heard from readers all over the country: It is painful to watch as our once-proud newspaper has become a shell nearly devoid of meaningful content. I keep hoping the local-news business will hit bottom and begin a long, slow climb back, but I don’t see any sign of that yet. I wonder when people will begin to feel a need for local news and be willing to pay for …

Why the media shouldn’t write Nikki Haley off

Why the media shouldn’t write Nikki Haley off

Welcome to Up for Debate. Each week, Conor Friedersdorf rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Layoffs of 115 newsroom staffers at The Los Angeles Times are the latest blow to the ailing news industry. What is the state of local journalism where you live, and how does it affect your community? Send your responses to [email protected] or simply reply to this email. Conversations of Note In New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation Republican primary, Donald Trump, the former president, beat Nikki Haley, the former South Carolina governor and ambassador to the United Nations. Now many in the press are presuming a Trump vs. Biden rematch. But I’ll proceed writing as though Haley could win, though it may strike some as unsavvy—because she could win, much as an underdog team could come back from a bad first quarter. In sports, play-by-play commentators often have strong instincts about the likeliest outcome, but no one wants or expects them to focus their real-time …

Readers on the morality of pornography

Readers on the morality of pornography

“I regard pornography as the fast food of sex: A little bit here and there won’t hurt anyone, but it’s not something to consume regularly,” one reader argues. Illustration by The Atlantic. Source: Millennium Images / Gallery Stock January 23, 2024, 3:14 PM ET Welcome to Up for Debate. Each week, Conor Friedersdorf rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week I asked readers, “Is pornography immoral?” H. regards most pornography as unhealthy, but not immoral: I found my life to be significantly improved after I stopped masturbating to pornography. I am living a healthy, productive life now and am in my first long-term relationship. I regard pornography as the fast food of sex: A little bit here and there won’t hurt anyone, but it’s not something to consume regularly. So while I don’t regard pornography as immoral, do I regard porn as moral? Would I encourage the average person to actively produce or consume it? No. …

Is pornography immoral? – The Atlantic

Is pornography immoral? – The Atlantic

Plus: Malaise among Americans Millennium Images / Gallery Stock January 19, 2024, 12:19 PM ET Welcome to Up for Debate. Each week, Conor Friedersdorf rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Is pornography immoral? Last week, I wrote an article arguing that the University of Wisconsin should not have fired Joe Gow, the longtime chancellor of its La Crosse campus, for making pornography with his wife. I took no position on the morality of pornography. Rather, I pointed out that Americans are divided about porn––a 2023 Gallup poll found that 58 percent of Americans believe it is wrong, while 39 percent believe that it is morally acceptable––and argued that diverse societies are better off agreeing that one is judged at work only for what one does at work than constantly arguing about which off-the-clock behaviors are bad enough to justify termination. Today, I want to solicit your viewpoints on pornography itself, specifically legal porn (given the near consensus …

Readers share their most misunderstood views

Readers share their most misunderstood views

Voting age, atheism, abortion, language education, and more Illustration by The Atlantic. Source: Coneyl Jay / Getty January 17, 2024, 3:41 PM ET Welcome to Up for Debate. Each week, Conor Friedersdorf rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week, I asked readers, “What is a belief or position you hold that you feel to be misunderstood or misrepresented by many people who disagree with you?” Replies have been edited for length and clarity. R. writes: I believe in fiscal responsibility and that the government has a responsibility to do its work at the lowest possible cost. Many who disagree with me believe that I therefore do not believe in a need to offer support to those who are physically, mentally, or financially needy. M. believes that no person should be allowed to serve in elected office if they are over 80, and that just as citizens age into voting at 18, they should age out of …

What conversations about DEI are missing

What conversations about DEI are missing

Welcome to Up for Debate. Each week, Conor Friedersdorf rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Question of the Week What is a belief or position you hold that you feel to be misunderstood or misrepresented by many people who disagree with you? Send your responses to [email protected] or simply reply to this email. Conversations of Note As America’s media outlets and social-media users discuss ongoing controversies about diversity, equity, and inclusion, or DEI, there is significant potential for people to talk past one another. DEI is so variable in what it means, or could mean, that misunderstandings abound. Should one support DEI or those attacking it? To my mind, the question is flawed. I could honestly answer that I am enthusiastically pro-diversity. I could also honestly answer that I am a critic of many left-identitarian DEI initiatives. But if I gave either answer, many people would draw erroneous conclusions about my beliefs. More specificity would better inform. …

What Trump and Haley’s Civil War gaffes reveal

What Trump and Haley’s Civil War gaffes reveal

This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. When the Civil War is in the news, it’s almost never a good sign about the health of the republic. First, here are three new stories from The Atlantic: An Entirely Different Election As the Supreme Court prepares to take up questions of Donald Trump’s eligibility to run for president, reporters are poring over transcripts of congressional debate about the post–Civil War Fourteenth Amendment, which bars insurrectionists, including former Confederates, from holding office. Meanwhile, Trump and Nikki Haley are engaging in a less historically literate debate about the conflict. At a December 27 event in New Hampshire, Haley conspicuously omitted slavery from an answer about the causes of the Civil War, focusing instead on “the freedoms of what people could and couldn’t do.” She later said that this was because she felt it was obvious, adding that as a …

Readers’ toughest questions for university presidents

Readers’ toughest questions for university presidents

Contending with higher education in America Adam Glanzman / The New York Times / Redux January 10, 2024, 3:29 PM ET Welcome to Up for Debate. Each week, Conor Friedersdorf rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here. Last week, I asked: If you could question leaders of academic institutions like a member of Congress, forcing them to contend with any aspect of higher education, what would you ask them? Replies have been edited for length and clarity. Kay kept it short: Given your massive endowments, why do you continue to serve such a limited number of students? David posed three pointed questions: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. told the nation, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” Do you believe that people derive any part of their inherent self-worth, positively …