All posts tagged: colleague Faith Hill

The wisdom of the teen

The wisdom of the teen

[ad_1] Their stage of life defies clear categorization. Brian Finke / Gallery Stock March 23, 2024, 9:40 AM ET This is an edition of The Wonder Reader, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a set of stories to spark your curiosity and fill you with delight. Sign up here to get it every Saturday morning. Teens exist in the murky space between youth and maturity—and in decades past, when the teen babysitter was a staple of American life, adults seemed to understand that. They recognized, my colleague Faith Hill writes in a new essay, that the teen babysitter “was grown-up enough to be an extra eye in the home—but childlike enough to go looking for snacks.” Faith reports that, today, the teen babysitter has all but disappeared: Many parents now believe that kids who are 12 or 13, once a standard babysitting age, shouldn’t even be left alone at home. “People seem to worry less about adolescents and more for them, and for their future prospects,” she writes. As Faith traces the decline of …

A Halloween Reading List for Adults

A Halloween Reading List for Adults

[ad_1] Channeling the joy of the most childish holiday Annie Otzen / Getty October 28, 2023, 8 AM ET This is an edition of The Atlantic Daily, a newsletter that guides you through the biggest stories of the day, helps you discover new ideas, and recommends the best in culture. Sign up for it here. “I believe in chasing the ghost of my former lighthearted self,” my colleague Faith Hill wrote last year. And “if there’s one day when I might almost catch up, it’s Halloween: the most ridiculous, inherently childish holiday, and perhaps the one grown-ups need most.” As we get older, experiences of pure, full-body fun and joy become more fleeting. Faith argues that adult Halloween is the perfect opportunity to get in touch with that kind of fun, and the freedom it can yield: “When everyone is wearing a dumb outfit and surrounded by tacky decorations, you all withhold judgment together. You might even remember, just for a second, who you were as a young child: unencumbered by pretensions and insecurities, present …