All posts tagged: cognitive behavioral therapy

YC-backed Pelago, a virtual clinic for addiction treatment, raises M Series C

YC-backed Pelago, a virtual clinic for addiction treatment, raises $58M Series C

Pelago Health,  Y Combinator-backed telehealth company that uses cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help treat people with tobacco, alcohol and opioid addictions, said Thursday it had raised a $58 million Series C round.  The recent funding, which brings its total raised to $151 million since being founded in 2017, comes two and a half years after Pelago, formerly known as Quit Genius, closed a Series B of $64 million amid the COVID pandemic.  Yusuf Sherwani, co-founder and CEO of Pelago, told TechCrunch that the company plans to use the proceeds bring on more users, advance its clinical research efforts, and develop further products. Most recently, the company expanded its offer its virtual therapy sessions to services for adolescents across its footprint. The virtual clinic’s medication-assisted treatment for substance use disorders is available across 50 states for adults and teens. It treats across all acuity levels along with co-occurring mental health conditions. Since its Series B, Pelago has experienced an impressive 11x revenue surge and claims to have 100% client retention. The company did not provide the …

Take a Vacation From Therapy

Take a Vacation From Therapy

About four years ago, a new patient came to see me for a psychiatric consultation because he felt stuck. He’d been in therapy for 15 years, despite the fact that the depression and anxiety that first drove him to seek help had long ago faded. Instead of working on problems related to his symptoms, he and his therapist chatted about his vacations, house renovations, and office gripes. His therapist had become, in effect, an expensive and especially supportive friend. And yet, when I asked if he was considering quitting treatment, he grew hesitant, even anxious. “It’s just baked into my life,” he told me. Among those who can afford it, regular psychotherapy is often viewed as a lifelong project, like working out or going to the dentist. Studies suggest that most therapy clients can measure their treatments in months instead of years, but a solid chunk of current and former patients expect therapy to last indefinitely. Therapists and clients alike, along with celebrities and media outlets, have endorsed the idea of going to therapy for …

Five Ways to Make Sure You Get More Sleep

Five Ways to Make Sure You Get More Sleep

Want to stay current with Arthur’s writing? Sign up to get an email every time a new column comes out. Weary with toil, I haste me to my bed,The dear repose for limbs with travel tired … These, the opening lines of Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 27,” accurately describe how I start out many a night. Unfortunately, my hope for rest all too often follows the bard’s next line: “But then begins a journey in my head.” The paean to sleep turns into a lament as I toss and turn. I am not alone. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Most days or every day” in 2020, nearly 15 percent of American adults had trouble falling asleep in the previous month. The result is that Americans report feeling sleepy an average of three days a week, either because they don’t sleep well enough or because they simply don’t get enough sleep. Some have trouble sleeping because they, like me, experience the journey in their head. Others could sleep fine, but don’t; one of humans’ …

What Is Shadow Work, and Why Is It All Over TikTok?

What Is Shadow Work, and Why Is It All Over TikTok?

This past Sunday, Keila Shaheen woke up to find that, once again, she was the best-selling author across all of Amazon. To get there, she’d outsold every other book on the platform—including Walter Isaacson’s buzzy biography of Elon Musk and the Fox News host Mark Levin’s screed The Democrat Party Hates America. She’d even beat out Oprah. At just 24, she is a bona fide publishing juggernaut. And yet few outside of TikTok have even bothered to notice. That’s probably in part because her best-selling book isn’t actually a book at all in the traditional sense. It’s a self-published mental-health guide called The Shadow Work Journal, and its success has been fueled by a steady drumbeat of videos posted on TikTok. Inspired by the writings of the psychoanalyst Carl Jung, it offers readers prompts and activities for interrogating the unconscious, repressed part of themselves. By getting to know our “shadow,” the Jungian theory goes, we can better understand ourselves and our behavior. One exercise invites readers to stare at themselves in a mirror for five …

It’s the Best Time in History to Have a Migraine

It’s the Best Time in History to Have a Migraine

Here is a straightforward, clinical description of a migraine: intense throbbing headache, nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and noise, lasting for hours or days. And here is a fuller, more honest picture: an intense, throbbing sense of annoyance as the pain around my eye blooms. Wondering what the trigger was this time. Popping my beloved Excedrin—a combination of acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine—and hoping it has a chance to percolate in my system before I start vomiting. There’s the drawing of the curtains, the curling up in bed, the dash to the toilet to puke my guts out. I am not a religious person, but during my worst migraines, I have whimpered at the universe, my hands jammed into the side of my skull, and begged it for relief. That probably sounds melodramatic, but listen: Migraines are miserable. They’re miserable for about 40 million Americans, most of them women, though the precise symptoms and their severity vary across sufferers. For about a quarter, myself included, the onset is sometimes preceded by an aura, a short-lived …

The Deadliest Eating Disorder Is Drug-Resistant

The Deadliest Eating Disorder Is Drug-Resistant

Updated at 12:21 p.m. on September 8, 2023 In the 1970s, they tried lithium. Then it was zinc and THC. Anti-anxiety drugs had their turn. So did Prozac and SSRIs and atypical antidepressants. Nothing worked. Patients with anorexia were still unable to bring themselves to eat, still stuck in rigid thought patterns, still chillingly underweight. A few years ago, a group led by Evelyn Attia, the director of the Center for Eating Disorders at New York Presbyterian Hospital and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, tried giving patients an antipsychotic drug called olanzapine, normally used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and known to cause weight gain as a side effect. Those patients in her study who were on olanzapine increased their BMI a bit more than others who were taking a placebo, but the two groups showed no difference in their cognitive and psychological symptoms. This was the only medication trial for treating anorexia that has shown any positive effect at all, Attia told me, and even then, the effects were “very modest.” Despite …