All posts tagged: Clare

From Valentine’s jewellery treats to Uniqlo’s next Clare Waight Keller drop: your week in chic

From Valentine’s jewellery treats to Uniqlo’s next Clare Waight Keller drop: your week in chic

Mejuri, our favourite Canadian jeweller (and worn by everyone from Sydney Sweeney to Hailey Bieber), is popping up in a delightful cloud-like space at Selfridges until 17 March. The feeling is pleasingly mutual. ‘London is a hub of fashion and culture — one that constantly inspires me,’ says co-founder Noura Sakkijha. We’re very into its diamond-scattered hoops, as well as these two jolly rings from its ‘Puffy Charlotte’ collection, which are exclusive to the pop-up. The perfect self-gifting Valentine’s treat. Source link

Humanists UK’s Clare Elcombe Webber elected chair of UK body for hospital chaplaincy and pastoral support

Humanists UK’s Clare Elcombe Webber elected chair of UK body for hospital chaplaincy and pastoral support

Pictured: Director of Humanist Care for Humanists UK, Clare Elcombe Webber A humanist expert in non-religious pastoral care has been elected chair of an important network supporting chaplaincy and pastoral care in UK hospitals. Clare Elcombe Webber, Director of Humanist Care for Humanists UK, was elected Chair of the Network for Pastoral, Spiritual, and Religious Care in Health, having previously served as its Vice Chair. The Network’s main purpose is to promote evidence-based best practice in healthcare. It sets out to include the voices of minority religions and beliefs, and to promote workforce diversity across the sector. As Director of Humanist Care, Clare oversees two important care programmes for Humanists UK. The first is the Non-Religious Pastoral Support Network (NRPSN), which trains and provides accredited non-religious pastoral carers in institutions like hospitals, prisons, universities and the armed forces. The second is Faith to Faithless, Humanists UK’s dedicated programme providing peer support, social connections, and asylum expertise to people who have left high-control religions. Growth in humanist pastoral care In recent years, non-religious pastoral care has …

Clare Chambers: Here’s how to kick your Christmas cynicism and embrace festive small pleasures

Clare Chambers: Here’s how to kick your Christmas cynicism and embrace festive small pleasures

Stay ahead of the trend in fashion and beyond with our free weekly Lifestyle Edit newsletter Stay ahead of the trend in fashion and beyond with our free weekly Lifestyle Edit newsletter Just to be clear, the Christmas herein discussed is not the Christian festival that falls at the end of advent and celebrates the birth of Jesus, but the secular bank holiday of the same name, taking place on the same day. This latter Christmas, is concerned chiefly with the gathering of clans, feasting, and the exchange of gifts. It tends to be followed by a period of austerity, bloating and regret. Before we consider how to recapture the small pleasures of Christmas, let us consider the small pains, which make the whole experience so exasperating and stressful. At the top of this list are Christmas cards. It’s unfathomable that technology hasn’t seen off this throwback to the Victorian era of the penny post. Surely no one enjoys the chore of writing out “Must make YYYY the year we finally meet up!” and their …

Theatre: Clare Brennan’s five best shows of 2023 | Theatre

Theatre: Clare Brennan’s five best shows of 2023 | Theatre

1. DruidO’CaseyGalway; JulyThe experience of seeing Seán O’Casey’s three great Dublin-based plays, run back-to-back in one sitting (with intervals!), was revelatory. Under Garry Hynes’s direction, O’Casey’s flawed, human, foible-full characters achieve a mythic quality (extraordinary acting from the ensemble). The action, set in some of Dublin’s poorest districts before, after and during the Easter Rising of 1916, speaks of universal sufferings in time of strife. 2. Oliver!Leeds Playhouse; December (runs until 27 January) ‘Hunger and poverty snap at characters’ heels’: Theo Wake in Oliver! Photograph: Alastair Muir James Brining’s buoyant production brings out the tensions that underpin Lionel Bart’s hit 1960s musical, with its powerful sense of the brightness of life contrasted with the crushing realities that canker expectations. Hunger and poverty snap at characters’ heels, even as they joyously dance and sing. Shadow-suffused staging reflects moral uncertainties: where is love when people are struggling just to survive? 3. Beyond Belief: The Life and Mission of John and Pat HumeGuildhall, Derry; April ‘A universal message’: Beyond Belief. Photograph: The Playhouse, Derry-Londonderry This musical play (written …

Body recovered from River Tay in search for missing woman Clare Marshall | UK News

Body recovered from River Tay in search for missing woman Clare Marshall | UK News

A body has been recovered from the River Tay in the search for a missing woman. Although formal identification is yet to take place, the family of Clare Marshall have been informed. A search was launched for Ms Marshall at the beginning of the week, with specialist help from the Police Scotland helicopter. The 64-year-old left the Dundee Road area of Perth in the early hours of Monday and is believed to have walked to Moncreiffe Island. A body was recovered near the island at around 12.50pm on Thursday. Read more from Sky News:Bodycam footage shows police searching for gunman‘Surreal’ for teen to be home after being missing for six years On Friday, a Police Scotland spokesperson said: “Officers have informed her family. “There are no suspicious circumstances surrounding the death.” Source link

Is Keir Starmer misremembering Labour’s 1997 victory? I was there, and we were radical | Clare Short

All seems well. The Tories are a mess and the Labour party is consistently ahead in the polls. The party’s thumping byelection victory in Rutherglen and Hamilton West is a good omen; the party won 56 seats in Scotland in 1997 and now has two. An improvement in Scotland is crucial. But there is also a sense of unease. The prevailing mood in the country is that people want change but are not in love with Labour. People I meet ask me why the party is being so timid in the face of poverty and inequality, with the health service on its knees and the housing crisis worsening. My view on what Keir Starmer is getting wrong is that he and his advisers misread the reasons for the 1997 victory. They seem to believe that New Labour’s watering down of policy, and the five promised on the famous pledge card, produced the win. But this is not how I remember it. The story begins in 1983 with a disastrous defeat for Labour. The party continued …

Watch out food snobs: microwaves are now Britain’s hottest cookery gadget | Clare Finney

“Oh, I don’t have a microwave,” that person who doesn’t have a microwave will tell you, judgment dusting their words like icing sugar atop a microwave mug cake. Inevitably, this will be followed by a light humblebrag like: “Call me old-fashioned, but I’ve just never seen the need.” They bake their cakes in the oven, reheat their leftovers on the hob, and they never have ready meals, which is all they really believe a microwave is good for. No matter that last week’s cooking trends report from Waitrose (no less) has revealed that microwave sales are up 13% at John Lewis compared to last year, and that it is this year’s most popular kitchen gadget among those surveyed; for that person, not owning a microwave is as fundamental to their personal brand as drinking natural wine and riding a fixie. As hot takes on household appliances go, this one intrigues me most. After all, no one gets het up over kettles. I don’t own a toaster for the same reason one might not own a …