All posts tagged: Chinas

China’s Hacker Network: What to Know About the I-Soon Document Leak

China’s Hacker Network: What to Know About the I-Soon Document Leak

Leaked documents posted online last week show how the Chinese government is working with private hackers to obtain sensitive information from foreign governments and companies. The hackers worked for a security firm called I-Soon, part of a network of spies for hire working closely with Beijing. The leak showed how China’s top surveillance agency, the Ministry of Public Security, has increasingly recruited contractors to attack government targets and private companies as part of a cyberespionage campaign in Asia. The leak is likely to stoke fears among leaders in Washington who have warned against such attacks in the United States. What information was revealed? I-Soon targeted telecommunications firms, online gambling companies and local governments throughout Asia. Its hackers were able to get private information including: records from a Vietnamese airline, with the identities of travelers. personal information from accounts on platforms like Telegram and Facebook. access to the private website of traffic police in Vietnam. software that helped run disinformation campaigns and hack accounts on X. The leak also included internal discussions at I-Soon, reflecting a …

Leaked Files Show the Secret World of China’s Hackers for Hire

Leaked Files Show the Secret World of China’s Hackers for Hire

The hackers offered a menu of services, at a variety of prices. A local government in southwest China paid less than $15,000 for access to the private website of traffic police in Vietnam. Software that helped run disinformation campaigns and hack accounts on X cost $100,000. For $278,000 Chinese customers could get a trove of personal information behind social media accounts on platforms like Telegram and Facebook. The offerings, detailed in leaked documents, were a portion of the hacking tools and data caches sold by a Chinese security firm called I-Soon, one of the hundreds of enterprising companies that support China’s aggressive state-sponsored hacking efforts. The work is part of a campaign to break into the websites of foreign governments and telecommunications firms. The materials, which were posted to a public website last week, revealed an eight-year effort to target databases and tap communications in South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, India and elsewhere in Asia. The files also showed a campaign to closely monitor the activities of ethnic minorities in China and online gambling …

China’s Rush to Dominate A.I. Comes With a Twist: It Depends on U.S. Technology

China’s Rush to Dominate A.I. Comes With a Twist: It Depends on U.S. Technology

In November, a year after ChatGPT’s release, a relatively unknown Chinese start-up leaped to the top of a leaderboard that judged the abilities of open-source artificial intelligence systems. The Chinese firm, 01.AI, was only eight months old but had deep-pocketed backers and a $1 billion valuation and was founded by a well-known investor and technologist, Kai-Fu Lee. In interviews, Mr. Lee presented his A.I. system as an alternative to options like Meta’s generative A.I. model, called LLaMA. There was just one twist: Some of the technology in 01.AI’s system came from LLaMA. Mr. Lee’s start-up then built on Meta’s technology, training its system with new data to make it more powerful. The situation is emblematic of a reality that many in China openly admit. Even as the country races to build generative A.I., Chinese companies are relying almost entirely on underlying systems from the United States. China now lags the United States in generative A.I. by at least a year and may be falling further behind, according to more than a dozen tech industry insiders …

Why China’s EV ambitions need virtual power plants

Why China’s EV ambitions need virtual power plants

If you, like me, are unsure how a power plant can be virtual, my colleague June Kim just published an insightful article explaining the technology and how it works. For this week’s newsletter, I took the chance to ask her some more questions about VPPs. It turns out the technology has a particularly good synergy with the EV industry, which is why the Chinese government has started to invest in VPPs.  “VPPs are basically just aggregations of distributed energy resources that can balance electricity on the grid,” June says—resources including electric-vehicle chargers, heat pumps, rooftop solar panels, and home battery packs for power backups. “They’re working in coordination to replace the function of a centralized coal plant or gas plant … but also add a whole host of other functionalities that are beneficial for the grid,” she says. To really make the most of these resources, VPPs introduce another layer: a central smart system that coordinates energy consumption and supply.  This system allows utility companies to handle times of higher energy demand by making adjustments …

China’s C919 jetliner showcased at Singapore Airshow | Aviation

China’s C919 jetliner showcased at Singapore Airshow | Aviation

Biennial air show opens to the public for the first time since the onset of the COVID-pandemic in 2020. China’s C919 jetliner is being showcased at Asia’s biggest airshow, as its Beijing-backed manufacturer seeks buyers for the country’s first homegrown passenger jet. Chinese state-run aerospace firm COMAC has touted the C919 as a challenger to the A320 and the 737 MAX, manufactured, respectively, by long-standing industry leaders Airbus and Boeing. The C919 made its inaugural flight outside China on Sunday at a media event ahead of the Singapore Airshow, which opened to the public for the first time since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. China’s Tibet Airlines said on the sidelines of the show on Tuesday that it had finalised an order for 40 of the narrow-body jets, which are designed to carry up to 192 passengers and travel up to 3,500 miles (5,644km). The C919, which has been flying commercially in China since May, has so far only been authorised to fly in its home country. The biennial air show, which …

Tibet Airlines finalises orders for 40 C919, 10 ARJ21 jets from China’s COMAC at Singapore Airshow

Tibet Airlines finalises orders for 40 C919, 10 ARJ21 jets from China’s COMAC at Singapore Airshow

COMAC’s C919 is on its first trip outside Chinese territory in Singapore, and the Chinese planemaker is positioning the jet as a viable alternative to the Airbus A320neo and Boeing 737 MAX single-aisle jet families, as they struggle to meet demand for new planes, and Boeing grapples with a string of crises. The plane is only certified within China and the first of now four C919s began flying with China Eastern Airlines last year. COMAC has received more than 1,000 C919 orders so far, state media reported last September, mostly from Chinese airlines and lessors. Gao Dongyue, an executive at Tibet Airlines, told Reuters that research to develop the C919 high-altitude variant was ongoing but that they could not yet disclose a timeline for the aircraft. “We have a lot of experience in this area,” he said. “And we’re taking into consideration all possible routes that could be suitable for the plane.” Tibet Airlines mainly flies domestically but also has routes to places such as Nepal’s capital Kathmandu. Source link

China’s securities watchdog opens ears for proposals to revive market

China’s securities watchdog opens ears for proposals to revive market

BEIJING/SHANGHAI : China’s securities watchdog said it held a series of seminars on Sunday and Monday with market participants who proposed tighter scrutiny of company listings and trading behaviour as part of efforts to revive market confidence. The meetings were led by the watchdog’s newly-installed chairman Wu Qing and held immediately after the week-long Lunar New Year holiday, reflecting the urgency to stabilize a market that dropped to five-year lows early this month. Participants, including small investors, listed companies, money managers and accounting firms, said regulators should tighten screws on initial public offerings and weed out listed companies that do not qualify. They also proposed a fairer trading mechanism and harsher punishment for law breakers, the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC) said in a statement. The watchdog said it would treat all proposals seriously and implement feasible ones immediately, reiterating its intention to “resolutely maintain market stability and control market risks.” Wu, nicknamed the “broker butcher” after an earlier regulatory stint, was appointed CSRC chairman on February 7. He replaced Yi Huiman, who had failed …

China’s electric carmakers take on Europeans on their own turf

China’s electric carmakers take on Europeans on their own turf

A man polishes an Atto 3 car from Chinese car maker BYD at the International Motor Show (IAA) in Munich, Germany, on Sept. 4, 2023. The car has gained in popularity among Europeans. Christof Stache/AFP via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Christof Stache/AFP via Getty Images A man polishes an Atto 3 car from Chinese car maker BYD at the International Motor Show (IAA) in Munich, Germany, on Sept. 4, 2023. The car has gained in popularity among Europeans. Christof Stache/AFP via Getty Images When Sjoerd Janssen was looking to buy a car in Denmark, he knew it had to be electric. Janssen, like many other Europeans, is concerned about the environment, but he was also drawn to electric vehicles thanks to generous government subsidies for those willing to give up their gas-powered cars. An IT manager, Janssen needed a car to commute every day, while at the same time offering enough space to take the whole family on road trips. He and his family test drove a Tesla. They also looked at a …

‘It’s legalised robbery’: anger grows at China’s struggling shadow banks | Chinese economy

‘It’s legalised robbery’: anger grows at China’s struggling shadow banks | Chinese economy

Wang Jin felt sure that he could invest in Sichuan Trust, an institution that was part of one of what he describes as the “four pillars” of China’s financial system: banks, securities, insurance and trusts. Promised a return on his investment of 8.3%, he handed over 1.6m yuan (£178,000) in 2019. “The trust had a state licence, so we believed in its integrity,” Wang (not his real name) recalls. Unluckily for him, in May 2020, the company said that it would be unable to repay 20bn yuan of investments. Protests ensued, with hundreds of middle-aged investors gathering outside the headquarters in Chengdu to demand their money back. By the end of the year, the local government had taken over the firm, which was reported to have a shortfall of more than 30bn yuan on its books, although the company said the sum was closer to 25bn. Now, Wang is one of more than 8,000 investors who have been given until 5 March to accept a sliding scale repayment plan that would return 80% of capital …

China’s Wang Yi tells Blinken US should lift sanctions on Chinese firms

China’s Wang Yi tells Blinken US should lift sanctions on Chinese firms

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken (L) and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi meet at the 60th Munich Security Conference on Feb. 16, 2024.  Wolfgang Rattay | Afp | Getty Images Washington should lift sanctions on Chinese companies and individuals, and that attempts to de-couple from China would only hurt the United States, China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi told U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken. The United States should lift the sanctions and not harm China’s legitimate development rights, Wang told Blinken on Friday on the sidelines of a Munich security conference, according to a statement from China’s foreign ministry. Washington has imposed sanctions on various Chinese companies that it accuses of working with China’s military despite denials from the firms. U.S. sanctions have also been imposed on individuals and entities over alleged human rights abuses in the Chinese region of Xinjiang. Sino-U.S. relations have shown signs of improvement in recent months as both sides took steps to re-establish channels of communication after ties between the two global superpowers sank to their lowest levels in …