All posts tagged: Brood

A cicada double brood is coming – it’s less rare than you think

A cicada double brood is coming – it’s less rare than you think

Here they come, once again, with their beady little eyes Georgi Baird/Shutterstock Each spring, cicadas burst forth from their underground burrows by the billions. This happens so regularly that we don’t usually remark on it. But this year, two broods – both having been underground for more than a decade – will emerge simultaneously, blanketing parts of the US with trillions of bugs. They will create a racket, an almighty buzz that stretches from the Atlantic Ocean to the border with Canada. And so will the news stories that herald their arrival. It is being called a historic event unlike anything we have seen since 1803 – but that depends on how you look at it. So, is this rare? Has it really been more than a century since more than one brood of cicadas emerged?Well, no. This happens every once in a while. In the US, there are three broods of cicadas that emerge every 13 years, and 12 broods that emerge every 17 years. Sometimes they align in the same year, as two …

Freddie’s, London: ‘Over salt beef, I brood on the need to review this Jewish deli’ – restaurant review | Sandwiches

Freddie’s, London: ‘Over salt beef, I brood on the need to review this Jewish deli’ – restaurant review | Sandwiches

Freddie’s, Belle Vue, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2AQ (freddiesdeli.co.uk). Breakfast plates £6-£15; starters £8-£13; sandwiches and platters £7-£17.50; desserts £4.50-£8; unlicensed Today, I am rehearsing for my dotage. I am doing this by gripping a properly stacked salt beef sandwich; the sort of multilayered, bulging affair that challenges the structural integrity of the sliced rye bread which is trying and failing to enclose it. The cure on the thick-cut tangle of salt beef is deep and there’s just enough amber fat to lubricate everything. On the side are sweet-sour “bread and butter” pickles, so called because the Illinois cucumber farmers who devised the recipe in the 1920s were able to barter their pickles for household goods, like bread and butter. This is the kind of vital intelligence I will share with younger companions over a salt beef sandwich when I am a certified alte kaker, Yiddish for old fart. Having just told this story, perhaps I am already eligible for certification. If so, then bring it on. The sandwich has been served to me …

When the Double Brood of Cicadas Will Come Out

When the Double Brood of Cicadas Will Come Out

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Parts of the United States are about to experience a rare natural phenomenon with the simultaneous emergence of two enormous adjacent broods of periodical cicadas. More than a trillion of these noisy bugs are set to pop out of the ground starting around April. The two broods – one concentrated in U.S. Midwestern states and the other in the South and Midwest, with a small area of overlap in Illinois – emerge together only once every 221 years.  Here is an explanation of what is expected to occur during this “dual emergence.” Cicadas are relatively large insects – 1-2 inches (2.5-5 cm) long – possessing sturdy bodies, bulging compound eyes and membranous wings. There are many different kinds of cicadas. Using needle-like mouthparts, cicadas feed on plant juices, called xylem, drawn from the roots of deciduous trees and shrubs. They spend much of their life cycle – years on end – underground as nymphs feeding on roots and drinking xylem. After they emerge, adult males “sing” to attract females using special organs called …

Cicadas Are Coming: Here’s What We Know About Brood XIX and Brood XIII

Cicadas Are Coming: Here’s What We Know About Brood XIX and Brood XIII

Ah, the sounds of summer. Splashing waves at the beach, a lawn sprinkler spinning deliriously, the bells of an ice-cream truck … and the constant buzz of cicadas. If you live in certain states, get ready, because they’re coming back in 2024. Cicadas, winged insects with an especially loud song, have a weird life cycle. They grow underground, but we humans mostly pay attention to them when they emerge into our above-ground world.  There are annual cicadas, which emerge from their underground life every year at various times. Then there are periodical cicadas, which emerge only every 13 or 17 years. Those groupings are called broods and are numbered. Because of their trackable schedule, these broods of periodical cicadas tend to steal all the headlines from their annual cicada comrades. This summer, it’s a double-brood year. That’s rare. According to ScienceAlert, the last time it happened was in 1803. One brood on a 13-year-cycle — called Brood XIX — and another on a 17-year cycle — called Brood XIII — are expected to pop out of …