All posts tagged: Brontë

Anne Brontë: The First Feminist Novelist?

Anne Brontë: The First Feminist Novelist?

[ad_1]   In just two novels, Anne Brontë took on the plight of governesses and married women’s legal rights (or lack thereof), as well as putting forward her own theory of universal salvation, which, at the time, was considered blasphemous and highly controversial. Yet today, her fame has yet to reach the heights of her two older sisters, Charlotte and Emily. Here, we will look into why that is the case – and why it is an unfair reflection on Anne as a writer – by exploring her life, work, and values.   Early Life Detail of Anne Brontë from Branwell Brontë’s 1835 Pillar Portrait. Source: IMDb   Anne Brontë was born on January 17, 1820 in Thornton, West Yorkshire, though in April of that year, the family moved to the parsonage at Haworth. She was the youngest child born to the Reverend Patrick Brontë and Maria Brontë (née Branwell), who had already had four children by the time Anne was born: her eldest sisters Maria (born late 1813 or early 1814), Elizabeth (born 1815), …

‘What do Saudi developers know of Heathcliff?’ Brontë country up in arms over windfarm plan | West Yorkshire

‘What do Saudi developers know of Heathcliff?’ Brontë country up in arms over windfarm plan | West Yorkshire

[ad_1] “Heathcliff! It’s me, Cathy, I’m up by the wind turbines.” It’s not quite what Kate Bush had in mind, and probably not what Emily Brontë imagined when she wandered the bleak West Yorkshire moors and created Wuthering Heights. But if one of Lancashire’s wealthiest men gets his way, vast swathes of moorland in Brontë country could become home to England’s biggest onshore windfarm. Richard Bannister owns Boundary Outlet, a chain of discount shopping centres, as well as nine square miles of boggy moorland between Haworth and Hebden Bridge he uses for grouse shooting. He has joined forces with a Saudi-backed company to develop plans to turn the “wily, windy” moor into the Calderdale windfarm. It would include up to 65 turbines, each rising up to 200 metres (655ft), 40 metres taller than Blackpool Tower. The windfarm could, say its backers, generate enough renewable energy to power 286,491 homes for a year and save 426,246 tonnes of carbon annually. Yet local opposition is building against the project, with particular concerns over the carbon-trapping peat bogs, …