All posts tagged: blind

BT left my blind father without a panic button | Broadband

BT left my blind father without a panic button | Broadband

[ad_1] My 101-year-old father was left without a landline and a functioning panic button after BT switched his phone service from analogue to digital without warning us. BT had informed us that the contract was about to finish, and asked me to contact them about renewing. I duly called and was, at no time, advised to contact the panic button provider, or told of the possible need for adaptors to connect analogue phones to the new service. After four hours on the phone to BT when the service failed, I was informed that digital adaptors were required to ensure our phones worked. Four days later, these had still not arrived and BT said it was unable to expedite the delivery. My father, who is registered blind and has only 30% hearing, was without his panic button for five days until the care line team attended and got it working.TB, Birmingham Your father’s predicament shows the human cost of the transfer of analogue telephone lines to an internet-based service. Since September, customers who start, or renew, …

It’s another Guardian Blind date wedding! How a lockdown love story ended in ‘I do’ | Dating

It’s another Guardian Blind date wedding! How a lockdown love story ended in ‘I do’ | Dating

[ad_1] That Saturday morning began chaotically. Naomi Clark had been out running and fallen over, miles from home. She limped back and arrived, flustered and sweaty, just in time to log on to Zoom for her blind date. She was ravenous, but in the rush had run out of time to order the takeaway Vietnamese summer rolls she had planned to eat in front of this stranger. She clicked open the call and there was Deej Phillips, her date, beaming back at her. He held up the meal he was about to tuck into, and guess what? He had gone for the same – summer rolls. “I think we’re soulmates!” Naomi said, laughing. A nervous pause. “Is it too soon to say?” she continued. Deej: “It was quite forward.” This may seem a strange way to go on a date, until you learn that this was April 2020, a time when everything was happening via a screen. Plus, this wasn’t just a regular blind date, but a Guardian Blind date – and every awkward moment …

A Guardian Blind Date happy ending, the boy who fled the nazis, and Philippa Perry’s advice on an alcoholic father – podcast | Life and style

A Guardian Blind Date happy ending, the boy who fled the nazis, and Philippa Perry’s advice on an alcoholic father – podcast | Life and style

[ad_1] The Guardian lockdown love story that ended in ‘I do’; the incredible story of Maxwell Smart, who lost his family in the Holocaust at 10 and avoided detection from the Nazis for two years; and Philippa Perry advises a reader not to invite his alcoholic father to his wedding. How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know [ad_2] Source link

Inadequate bird flu testing is making pandemic experts concerned we’re “flying blind” with H5N1

Inadequate bird flu testing is making pandemic experts concerned we’re “flying blind” with H5N1

[ad_1] After public health officials confirmed H5N1, the virus also known as bird flu, jumped from poultry to cows and recently infected an American, they’ve warned that if the virus strain made its way to pigs, it could be a time to press the panic button. That’s because swine are closer to humans in genetic terms, acting as a prime reservoir for viruses to mutate into something that could turn into a far-reaching pandemic in people. But now, a new study suggests that dairy cows might have the same potential as pigs, which could improve the bird flu’s capability of being more human-to-human transmission.  As reported by Nature, preliminary data shows that the flu virus can jump back and forth between cows and birds thanks to a specific receptor. This specific trait might allow the virus to spread more widely and develop more mutations along the way. If a single cow can be a host to multiple types of influenza over time, it could evolve to more readily infect humans.  “The biggest question is whether …

Life-changing clinical trial yields significant vision improvement for blind patients

Life-changing clinical trial yields significant vision improvement for blind patients

[ad_1] Trial participant Michael Kalberer at a follow-up appointment after receiving the experimental CRISPR-based therapy. (CREDIT: Mass Eye and Ear) In a groundbreaking clinical trial, 79% of participants exhibited significant improvements after receiving an experimental CRISPR-based gene therapy designed to correct a rare genetic form of blindness, detailed in a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. There are currently no FDA-approved treatments for this disorder, which affects approximately 2 to 3 in every 100,000 newborns. The study marks a pivotal moment in medical research, representing the first use of in vivo CRISPR gene editing—modifying genes within the human body. Dr. Mark Pennesi, an ophthalmologist at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) and a lead scientist in the trial, expressed the profound impact of these medical advancements. “There is nothing more rewarding to a physician than hearing a patient describe how their vision has improved after a treatment,” said Pennesi. He shared anecdotes from trial participants, including one who was able to locate their phone and visually confirm their coffee machine’s operation through …

There Is a Massive Blind Spot in Our Knowledge

There Is a Massive Blind Spot in Our Knowledge

[ad_1] Source: Courtesy of Gregg Henriques There is a massive blind spot in our understanding of the world. This is evident in the current state of our knowledge systems, which can be described as being in a state of chaotic, fragmented pluralism. The reason for this is that there is no shared, general system of understanding that allows us to grip the world and our place in it effectively. Those who know the history of religion, philosophy, and science in the West (i.e., Western Europe that spawned the scientific Enlightenment) will be well-acquainted with this fact. This has not always been the case. Indeed, for many hundreds of years the worldview in the West was coherent and essentially singular (which is not to say accurate). The Roman Empire adopted Christianity in 380 AD, and it was the primary belief system in Europe for over a thousand years. Indeed, the emergence of the “Western World” is intimately connected with the idea of “Christendom.” However, the dominant grip that Christianity had on shaping the worldview of the …

Blind date: ‘What did she make of me? Who is this weird Brit?’ | Life and style

Blind date: ‘What did she make of me? Who is this weird Brit?’ | Life and style

[ad_1] Scott on Maria What were you hoping for?Small plates and big chat. First impressions?Phew, she’s really easy to talk to and knows what half the wine on the list is. This should be a very lovely evening. What did you talk about?Fizzy water. Em and en dashes. How orange wine is made. Not being able to do outdoor PE due to prowling wild bears. Most awkward moment?Asking Maria what it like growing up in Toronto. She is from Vancouver! Good table manners?Excellent. I usually hate eating out on a first date but felt very at ease thanks to Maria’s disarming persona. Best thing about Maria?She was warm and made me feel comfortable. She was also wearing great blue eyeliner. Q&A Fancy a blind date? Show Blind date is Saturday’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Saturday magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every …

Blind date: ‘I warned him if he was less than complimentary, my girls would hunt him down’ | Relationships

Blind date: ‘I warned him if he was less than complimentary, my girls would hunt him down’ | Relationships

[ad_1] Trisha on Neil What were you hoping for? Konstantin meets Villanelle. First impressions? Tall, handsome, closet ginger Glaswegian, a tad nervous, but it would have been odd not to be. What did you talk about? Zen and neuroscience. Men’s Sheds and what an awesome organisation it is. Theatre. Music. Our children. DNA and secret siblings. Liverpool v Glasgow (no brainer). Whether or not the waiter had taken a shine to Neil. The perils of silent retreats. Women’s football. Changing careers. People wearing blankets … We talked a lot! Most awkward moment?I couldn’t connect to Uber, so Neil sorted my lift, which meant he had to get the bus home. Good table manners?Yes, despite having to tackle the world’s largest lamb shank. Best thing about Neil?No one thing – great guy, great company. Q&A Fancy a blind date? Show Blind date is Saturday’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of …

The Elephant and the Blind review: Thomas Metzinger hunts for ‘pure consciousness’

The Elephant and the Blind review: Thomas Metzinger hunts for ‘pure consciousness’

[ad_1] The Elephant and the BlindThomas Metzinger (MIT Press) Books about consciousness don’t come any more radical (or with a longer title) than The Elephant and the Blind: The experience of pure consciousness – philosophy, science, and 500+ experiential reports. As you might guess, its author, Thomas Metzinger, has carried out a monumental study of the state of “pure”, or “minimal”, consciousness, experienced during meditation and of which we may all have had glimpses. In his book, Metzinger sends a powerful triple message: we should rethink how to study consciousness scientifically; celebrate the wonder of these experiences of pure consciousness… [ad_2] Source link

Dealing With Our Eating Blind Spots

Dealing With Our Eating Blind Spots

[ad_1] Source: Nanzeeba Ibnat / iStock When it comes to how we eat, including what foods appeal to us, the foods we end up choosing, how we gauge our hunger, and what we think we need to consume at any given time, it can be a struggle to know what our body and brain are telling us. In fact, it is impossible to do so. Much of what is going on in our brains and bodies when we choose what and when to eat is hidden from our conscious awareness. The Pleasure Principle One of the ways that food can confound us is that it brings us pleasure. We cannot just decide one day to start liking broccoli instead of ice cream. Many of the hidden byways involved in food consumption have been spelled out by neuroscientist David J. Linden in his book, The Compass of Pleasure (2011). Studies on humans, rats, and primates have shown that we all share a preference for sugar and fat, and often salt. It doesn’t stop there. Humans will …