All posts tagged: assumption

The crime of living: What the kidnapping of Patty Hearst teaches us about assumption and perspective

The crime of living: What the kidnapping of Patty Hearst teaches us about assumption and perspective

Depending on whose story you believe the most, Patty Hearst is either a victim, a bank robber, a kidnapper or a privileged white woman who found herself uniquely positioned to rebel against her family in a fashion so monumental that the recounting of it will outlive everyone involved. Abducted from her apartment in Berkeley, California on February 4, 1974 by members of a small group of revolutionaries calling themselves the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA), Hearst went from being known as the apolitical 19-year old granddaughter of newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst to, in just a few short months, a suspected willing participant in a string of crimes led by her captors; one of whom — Willie Wolfe — she was reportedly in a consensual romantic relationship with.  Fifty years have gone by since Hearst made the switch from Patty to “Tania” — the name she took on while enacting bank heists with the SLA — to Patricia, as she prefers to be called. And there remains a great deal of speculation as to whether or not Stockholm syndrome played a part in …

Why “adulthood” is impossible to define

Why “adulthood” is impossible to define

The markers of “growing up” are constantly evolving. Adam Maida / The Atlantic / Getty January 27, 2024, 8 AM ET This is an edition of The Wonder Reader, a newsletter in which our editors recommend a set of stories to spark your curiosity and fill you with delight. Sign up here to get it every Saturday morning. What does it really mean to “grow up”? As my colleague Julie Beck noted in 2016, markers of adulthood are always evolving, and a set definition is impossible to come by. (When I was a young child, I was convinced that turning 11 would signal adulthood in a significant way—something about the double one felt impossibly mature—but that didn’t really prove to be a helpful framework.) Each possible meaning of “adulthood”—financial independence, living alone, having kids—brings with it an assumption about what should matter, both to an individual and to society. Today’s newsletter explores some of these assumptions, and how the concept of “growing up” has changed. Americans Can’t Decide What It Means to Grow Up By …

Rishi Sunak Has ‘Working Assumption’ Election Will Be In Late 2024

Rishi Sunak Has ‘Working Assumption’ Election Will Be In Late 2024

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak speaks during a visit to the MyPlace Youth Centre, in Mansfield, in the East Midlands (Alamy) 3 min read04 January Rishi Sunak has said it is his “working assumption” that there will be a general election in the second half of this year following speculation that the Prime Minister may choose to call it in the spring. Sunak made the comments suggesting an autumn poll while on a visit in the East Midlands on Thursday.  “In the meantime, I’ve got lots that I want to get on with,” he added.  An election must be called by the end of 2024, and Labour is widely expected to enter government, having held a double-digit lead in the polls for over a year. But opinion has remained divided on whether the vote is likely to be in May, or later in the year, as Sunak has indicated today. Ultimately it is in Sunak’s gift to decide when to go to the public, having repealed the fixed term parliament act. Last week, shadow cabinet minister Emily …

Why the assumption that British voters switch to the Conservatives as they grow older is wrong

Why the assumption that British voters switch to the Conservatives as they grow older is wrong

If a man is not a socialist by the time he is 20, he has no heart. If he is not a conservative by the time he is 40, he has no brain. At first glance, this quote, attributed to Winston Churchill, appears to fit the evidence in Britain. A survey conducted during the 2019 general election reported in our recent book showed that 23% of respondents under the age of 30 voted Conservative and 55% voted Labour. In contrast, 59% of the over 65s voted Conservative and only 13% voted Labour. However, a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between age and voting in Britain over a period of 55 years from 1964 to 2019 shows that growing older does not directly affect support for the Conservatives. At the same time, it does appear to influence Labour voting. As voters get older they are a bit more likely to support Labour but not the Conservatives. The paper which presents these findings is part of a special issue of the journal Electoral Studies, being published in …