All posts tagged: arthouse

‘I Saw the TV Glow’ review: Queer horror has a new arthouse masterpiece

‘I Saw the TV Glow’ review: Queer horror has a new arthouse masterpiece

The mysterious allure of stumbling upon some unknown oddity on late-night cable is recreated (and repurposed, to devastating effect) in Jane Schoenbrun’s wildly abstract, masterfully accomplished I Saw the TV Glow. The A24 production is a remarkable follow-up and spiritual companion to Schoenbrun’s Sundance emo-horror breakout We’re All Going to the World’s Fair, a hazy, low-budget indie from 2022 told through late-night vlogs and video chats. The latter was their narrative feature debut, and it captured an online obsession with urban myth that the writer/director used as a vessel for a tale of physical discomfort and social unbelonging. It created, through its subtext and aesthetic approach, a mood comprising the constant, oppressive white noise of gender dysphoria. I Saw the TV Glow picks up that baton and charges headfirst through the screen. It captures the creeping nostalgia of ’90s children’s and young adult television, as seen through the eyes of two deeply isolated teenagers on arduous, dreamlike journeys of self-discovery. Along the way, the worlds of memory and fiction blur beyond recognition, as the boundary …

The 50 best arthouse films of all time, ranked! From The Red Shoes and Gummo to Moonlight and 8 1/2

The 50 best arthouse films of all time, ranked! From The Red Shoes and Gummo to Moonlight and 8 1/2

It’s not the ‘art’ of a film that makes it ‘arthouse’. That quality can be found as readily in many other, less feted genres, as any passionate champion of zombie-horror gore or Dwayne Johnson’s acting will tell you. The difference is that arthouse is art, and knows it. These are films which proudly aim beyond mere money-making for multinational media conglomerates. They push at the boundaries of the form, explore its edges and insist that film-going isn’t just for entertainment, it should be an experience, too.   Is ‘arthouse’ a genre, then? Like the western or the rom-com? If so, it’s one that often overlaps with others. Many of these films could also be categorised as ‘independent’ or ‘slow cinema’ or ‘experimental’ – and for a brief period in the 1970s, ‘arthouse’ was also a serviceable euphemism for European porn flicks.  Elsewhere, English-language Hollywood product still dominates, but here it is the foreign-language film which comes out on top. Because foreigners are always arty, aren’t they? Especially the French, who have no direct translation for ‘arthouse’, …